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Full text of "National year book"

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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01080 6229 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 









http://archive.org/details/nationalyearbook1909sons 



NATIONAL YEAR BOOK 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 



OF THE 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



CONTAINING LIST OF THE GENERAL OFFICERS AND OF 
THE NATIONAL COMMITTEES FOR 1909; OFFICERS 1SS9 TO 
1908; CHARTER, CONSTITUTION, AND BY-LAWS; OFFICERS 
OF STATE SOCIETIES AND LOCAL CHAPTERS; PROCEED- 
INGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS, APRIL 30 AND MAY 1, 
1909; RECORDS OF MEMBERS ENROLLED FROM MAY 1, 1908, 
TO APRIL 30, 1909. 



1892161 



National Year Book 



909 



€ 



i) 



Society of the 



Sons of the American Revolution 



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£<( 




MORRIS B. BEARDSLEY 

PRESIDENT GENERAL 









c i 



COMPILED BY 

A. HOWARD CLARK 
Secretary General and Registrar General 



17 8 3 2 



'RESS OF JUDD & DETWKILER, INC., WASHINGTON, D. C. 









" 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 



OF 'THE 



Sons of the American Revolution. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

Elected at the Twentieth Annual Congress, Baltimore, McL, 
April 30 and May J, \ 909* 

Session at Annapolis, May t, 1909* 



President General: 
Morris B. Beardsrey, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Vice-Presidents General: 
Dr. .Cearkson N. GuyEk, 301 Jackson Building, Denver, Colo. 
Cor. Peter F. Pescud, 818 Gravier St., New Orleans, La. 
Wirrakd Secor, Forest City, Iowa. 

George C. SargENT, S06 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
Major MosEs Veare, 727 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Secretary General and Registrar General: 
A. Howard Crark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer General: 
John II. Burroughs, 15 William St., New York, N. Y. 

Historian General: 
Wai/TICR Kendaee WaTKINS, t 1 10 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

Chaplain General: 
REV. Frank OeivER Harr, D.D., 4 West 76th St., New York, N. Y 

3 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. 



MORRIS BEACH BEARDSLEY. 
President General. 

Morris Beach BeardseEy, son of Samuel G. and Mary (Beach) Beards- 
ley, was born August 13, 1849, at Trumbull, Conn.; was prepared for 
college at Stratford, Conn. ; and graduated from Yale in the Class of 
1870. He studied law at the Columbia Law School, New York, and in 
the office of William K. Secley. On June 25, 1872, he was admitted to 
practice and formed a partnership with Mr. Seeley, under the name of 
Seeley & Beardsley. The partnership was dissolved January I, 1874, 
when he was elected City Clerk of Bridgeport, and held that office until 
he was elected Judge of Probate, January 1, 1877. He was continuously 
re-elected Judge of Probate until 1893, when nc declined a renomiuation, 
and was elected Representative in the General Assembly of Connecticut. 
From 1893 to 1897 ' le practiced law in Bridgeport and then formed a 
law partnership with his son, Samuel F. Beardsley, which continues. 
He married Lucy J. Fayerweathcr, June 5, 1873. He became a member 
of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
1896, and was its Vice-President in 1903-04. 

He was elected Vice-President General at the Congress in Independ- 
ence Hall, Philadelphia, May 3, 1905, and during that year was Chair- 
man of the Educational Committee. On May 2, 1905, Judge Beardsley 
was made chairman of a special committee to secure a charter from the 
United States Congress, a work to which he devoted careful attention, 
resulting in the Act of Incorporation of The National Society of Sons 
of the American Revolution, approved by President Roosevelt, June 9, 
1906. In j 906 he was Chairman of a Committee on Revision of the Con- 
stitution and By-Laws, and at the Denver Congress in June, 1907, sub- 
mitted a new Constitution and By-Laws, in accordance with the terms 
of the National Charter, which were adopted. In 1907 and 1908 In- 
served on the National Executive Committee. 

Judge Beardsley is Governor of the Society of Colonial Wars in the 
State of Connecticut, and a member of other patriotic organizations. 



DR. CLARKSON N. GUYER. 

Vice-President Generae. 

Dr. Ci.arkson NewbEry Guver, elected Vice-President General at the 
Denver Congress, re-elected at the Buffalo Congress in 190S, and at the 
Baltimore Congress, 1909, was born in Albany, New York, on April 1. 
1867, He is a son of Hugh P. Guyer, a prosperous merchant of that 



BIOGRAPHIES 01- GENERAL OFFICERS 



town, and studied dentistry in the office of Dr. E. C. Edmonds, coming 
to Denver in 1S79. 

Returning East he took a course in the College of Dental Surgery at 
Baltimore, and was graduated from that institution. Immediately re- 
entering upon his profession in Denver, he carefully laid the foundations 
which have brought him lucrative practice and distinguished honors. 

He has been President of the Denver Dental Society; three times a 
memher of the State Board of Dental Examiners, for two years its 
Secretary, and is now serving a fourth term as a member of that Board; 
one of the Founders, Trustee, and Professor of Surgery in the Homeo- 
pathic College of Denver; Clinical Instructor in the Western Dental 
College of Kansas City; a Knight Templar and thirty-second degree 
Mason; a public-spirited citizen, who has served upon many important 
committees of the Denver Chamber of Commerce. 

His membership and interest in the Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution is the good wine of his life to be mentioned last. 
With the ancestral blood of the Diekensons, the Patricks, the Palmers, 
the Seymours, and the Campbells of Revolutionary days, of Governor 
john Webster of Colonial times mingling in his veins, he has ever been 
a magnetic, patriotic force in the Colorado Society, of which he was 
President in 1904. 

When it was definitely determined to hold the Eighteenth National 
Congress in Denver, its members with unanimous accord turned to him 
for the needed touch of his genius of organization. It made him chair- 
man of a convention committee, with power to appoint different com- 
mittees. The chairman of these committees he formed into an executive 
committee, over which he presided at luncheon every Saturday, with an 
average attendance of about fifteen. Under his "smile and push" the 
work was followed up so closely that every dollar of the entertainment 
fund was actually in bank before the arrival of a National delegate, and 
with sufficient margin to offer a "Prize Membership Banner" to the 
National Society, to stimulate its membership during the ensuing and 
succeeding years. 

lie has been active in recruiting work in the West, and was instru- 
mental in organizing a new Society in Wyoming, which was chartered 
at the Buffalo Congress, and, as Chairman of the Committee on Organi- 
zation for the North and West, formed the New Mexico Society, 
December 26, 1908, and the Idaho Society, April 8, 1909. 



COE. PETER F. PESCUD. 
Vice-President General. 



PETER Francisco Pescud, President of the Louisiana Society and a 
member of the District of Columbia Society, was elected Vice-President 
General at the Twentieth Annual Congress, May 1, 1909. 

He was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, September 21, 1850, and was 
educated at the Raleigh Academy and at the Universities of North 
Carolina and Virginia. 



6 SUNS OF Tiu; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Upon leaving the university he began his business career as local agent 
at Raleigh for a number of insurance companies, and later became a 
special agent for the entire South for one of the British insurance com- 
panies. For several years he served on the staff of former Governor 
Vance of North Carolina. 

He removed to New Orleans in 1883, and has built up a very exten- 
sive business in fire, marine, and other lines of insurance. 

Air. Pescud is the great-great-grandson of Robert Brooke, third 
Governor of Virginia and Knight of the Golden Horseshoe; great- 
grandson of Peter Francisco, a famous partisan trooper under Morgan 
in the American Revolution, and a grandson of Col. Edward Pescud, 
proprietor and editor of the Petersburg (Va.) Republican during the 
latter part of the seventeenth century and the early part of the eighteenth 
century. His father, Peter F. Pescud, was a prominent wholesale and 
retail druggist of Raleigh, and during the Civil War was medical pur- 
veyor for the State of North Carolina. 

Mr. Pescud is a member of the Board of Trade, Cotton Exchange, 
director of the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Plospital, member of the 
Louisiana and Virginia Historical Societies, Club on Wheels, Boston 
and Pickwick clubs, French Opera, and Carnival organizations. Pie is 
also a director of the National Rice Milling Company, Lafayette Ware- 
house Company, Maginnis Land and Improvement Company, and New 
Orleans and Pacific Railroad Company. 

WILLARD SECOR. 

ViCK-PkKSIDUNT GENI'RAU 

In 1685 Louis XIV published the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 
which caused half a million of the flower of France to flee to foreign 
lands for refuge from Huguenot persecution. 

The ancestors of the subject of this sketch, on the paternal side, 
came to America about the year 1689, as a result of that religious in- 
tolerance. They settled at New Rochellc, N. Y., and so prolific have 
been the succeeding generations that nearly every State in the Union 
has representatives of the liberty-loving and determined pioneers. 

Willard Secor was born at Forest City, Iowa, June 28, 1869. He was" 
educated in the public schools of his native town and at: Cornell College, 
Mount Vernon, Iowa. At the age of twenty he went into a bank at 
Winnebago, Minn., as bookkeeper, and was soon promoted to the 
cashiership. After a few years as cashier, the duties of which were so 
taxing on his strength, he entered the real estate office of his father, 
and is now the Secretary and General Manager of The Secor Com- 
pany — Real Estate, Loans, and Insurance — in his native town. He is 
also connected with two insurance companies in Des Moines, and is 
regarded as an all-round hustler in business and politics; has been a 
member of the town council of Forest City and Secretary of the County 
Republican Committee. 



BIOGRAPHIES 01- GENERAL, OFFICERS J 

He was State Treasurer for four years of the Iowa Society, Sons of 
the American Revolution, and President in 1907. 

He traces his genealogy to Revolutionary sires through four distinct 
lines of ancestry. 

He was elected Treasurer General at the Denver Congress and re- 
elected at the Buffalo Congress. At the Baltimore Congress he was 
elected Vice-President General. 

GEORGE CLARK SARGENT. 

Vice-President General. '*- 

George Ceark Sargent was born in Nevada City, California, on July 
26, i860. His father was the late Aaron A. Sargent, who came to 
California in 1849, and who represented the State of California in the 
House of Representatives and in the United States Senate for twelve 
years, and was afterwards United States Minister to Germany. The 
Sargent family had for generations lived in and near Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, the founder of the family having come from England 
and settled in Amesbury, Massachusetts, in 1640. Mr. Sargent's great- 
great-grandfather, Nathan Poore, was lieutenant in Second Essex 
County Regiment Massachusetts Militia during the Revolutionary War. 

George C. Sargent received his education partly in the common 
schools of Nevada County, and latterly in those of Washington, D. C. 
By reason of trouble with his eyes, which developed at thirteen years 
of age, and could not be corrected until his twenty-sixth year, he was 
not able to take a regular course in college. He was, however, from 
early boyhood greatly interested in mechanical and scientific things, 
which caused him to take a scientific course with Prof. Thomas Price, 
of San Francisco, later at the Mining Academy in Berlin, and finally 
in the University of California. In 1879 and 1880 he studied law. In 
1887 he completed his studies in law, and was admitted to practice by 
the Supreme Court of the State of California, then presided over by the 
late Chief Justice Niles Searls. The same jurist presided over the court 
which admitted Mr. Sargent's father to practice. 

Since his admission to the bar, Mr. Sargent has resided continuously 
at San Francisco and become identified with many of the political re- 
form movements of the city, and with many of its social and fraternal 
organizations. He is a life member of the Society of California Pion- 
eers, and lias successively held office in the California Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution as Junior Vice-President, Senior 
Vice-President, and President. He was elected Vice-President General 
of the National Society at the Baltimore Congress. 

MAJOR MOSES VEALE. 

Vice-President General. 

Moses Veai.e, President of the Philadelphia Chapter, and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, was elected Vice- ['resident General of the National Society at the 



8 SONS 01- THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Baltimore Congress. His grandfather, Delany Sharpe, was apprentice 
on the privateer ''Speedwell" in the Revolutionary War. 

Major Veale was born at Bridgeton, N. ]., November 9, 1832. His 
boyhood was passed in Philadelphia, and that city has been his home 
most of his life. He was educated at the Quaker Seminary, and was an 
instructor there for three years. He came to the bar in 1856 and still 
continues the practice of law. He served throughout the Civil War, 
from May 1, 1861, to June, 1865, first as second lieutenant of Pennsyl- 
vania cavalry, later as captain and major, including long service on the 
staff of General Geary. Fie participated in several of the historic battles 
of the war, was a prisoner, was wounded, and was highly commended 
for his gallantry. 

He is rector's warden of the parish of St. Philip's Episcopal Church, 
and an officer of several church organizations and charitable societies, 
and is a member of the Penn Club and of the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. 

During the last few years he has been actively interested in the mark- 
ing and preservation of the graves of the -signers of the Declaration of 
Tndependence in Pennsylvania and other original States. 

A. HOWARD CLARK. 
Secretary General and Registrar General. 

A. Howard Ceark became a member of the District of Columbia 
Society at its organization, was elected Assistant Registrar May 5, 
1S90, and was 'one of its Secretaries from 1891 to 1893. He was Secre- 
tary General of the National Society in 1892, and has been Registrar 
General since 1893. Since 1904 he has also served as Secretary General. 

He was born in Boston April 13, 1850. His ancestors in the Revolu- 
tion were Enoch Clark, Enoch Hall, Capt. Thomas Jenner Carnes, and 
Major Edward Carnes, of the Massachusetts Militia and Continental 
Army. 

Mr. Clark was educated at Boston and at private schools in New 
York and New Jersey, and at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., 
which gave him the honorary degree of Master of Arts in 1906. 

He engaged in mercantile business in New York city from 1S67 to 
1875; in 1879 was assistant on the United States Fish Commission and 
later expert on the Tenth Census. Since 1881 he has been connected 
with the Smithsonian Institution as Curator of the Division of History 
in the National Museum and as editor of the publications of the Institu- 
tion. In 1883 he served on the Executive Staff of the United States 
Commission at the International Fisheries Exposition in London, and 
was United States Expert Commissioner to the Paris Exposition of 
1889, by appointment of President Cleveland, when he was honored by 
order of President Carnot with the decoration of Officier du Merite 
Agricole. He was a member of the International Geographical Con- 
gress at Paris in 1889. 

He is a member of the Baronial Order of Runnymede (descendants 
of sureties of the Magna Charta), Archivist General of the National 



BIOGRAPHIES 01? Gl£NI£RAI< OFFICERS 



9 



Society of Americans of Royal Descent, member of the Society of 
Mayflower Descendants, the Society of Colonial Wars, and from 1889 
to 1908 was Secretary of the American Historical Association. 

JOHN HARRIS BURROUGHS. 

T R E A S UR I*. R G E N E R A I . 

John Harris Burroughs was born at Trenton, N. J., April 17, 1849, 
son of Charles Burroughs, who served as mayor of Trenton for fifteen 
consecutive years — from 1832 until 1847 — who was also judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas for Mercer County, New Jersey, for sixteen 
years. John Burroughs, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was active in the Revolutionary War from the latter part of 1776 until 
the surrender of Cornwallis at the battle of Yorktown in i/8t. Mr. 
Burroughs is descended from John Burroughs, who settled in New- 
town, Long Island, in 1653, with other English colonists. In the 
capacity of Treasurer, Vice-President, and President, he has served 
the Union League Club, Brooklyn, N. Y., in which city he has resided 
since 1S65. He is Second Vice-President of the Empire State Society, 
S. A. R. Pie has associated with him his son, Harris S. Burroughs, 
dealing in commercial paper and bank stocks in New York city, in 
which business Mr. Burroughs has been engaged since 1874. 

WALTER KENDALL WATKINS. 
Historian General. 

WALTER KENDAEE WaTKINS was born in Boston, August 5, 1855, the 
son of Samuel Augustus Walkins and Jeanette Constantina Bjornberg. 

The Watkins family were in Roxbury, Mass., at an early date, and 
were among those who settled New Roxbury, Conn. (Woodstock), in 
the last part of the seventeenth century. Just previous to the Revolu- 
tion John Watkins, traveling up the Connecticut River, became one of 
the first settlers of Woodstock and Pomfrct, Vt. His son James, the 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, came just after 1800 to Mai- 
den, Mass. His maternal grandfather, Adolph Bjornberg, was a Major 
of Hussars under Napoleon, and participated in the Moscow campaign; 
on his experience he published a work late in life. 

After being educated in the grammar and English High Schools in 
Boston, Mr. Watkins entered into the engraving and publishing trades. 
Becoming interested in antiquarian and genealogical researches, lie 
adopted those pursuits, and has devoted his time exclusively to those 
matters for the past twenty years. 

His particular fields of research have been the British Isles and the 
oldest New England towns. He has published his results in many news- 
papers and magazines, notably the pages of the New England Historical 
and Genealogical Register, to which he has frequently contributed in 
the past quarter of a century. 

A specialty has been his works on the early history of Boston— The 






10 SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Defense of Boston in 1814; Boston in 1800; The Subscribers to the 
First Town House. There is now in press a work on Colonial Taverns 
of Boston. 

Mr. Watkins held for five years the office of Assistant Librarian and 
Curator of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society. He has 
been a charter member of Boston Chapter, S. A. R., of which he was 
also a director; of Old Suffolk Chapter, of which he was Historian, 
and of Maiden Chapter, of which he has been its Secretary since its 
organization. A charter member of the Massachusetts Society of the 
Colonial Wars, he was its first secretary and now holds the office of 
genealogist and deputy secretary. An active member of the local his- 
torical societies, he is also an honorary member of others. 

At the present time he is the head, or Governor, of the Society of the 
Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay, chartered in 1629, 
which is composed of the descendants of the early freemen of the Bay 
colony. 

His professional services are largely devoted to investigations in the 
family history of bygone Bostonians in regard to land titles and ancient 
rights. 

He was elected Historian General at the Buffalo Congress, May 1, 
1908, and reelected at the Baltimore Congress. 

REV. FRANK OLIVER HALL, D. D. 
Chaplain General. 

Frank Oeiver Hale was born in New Haven, Conn., March 19, 
i860. His father's name was Oliver A. Hall and his mother's Clara 
A. (Stanley). He spent his boyhood days in California, but received 
his education for the most part in New England. He fitted for college 
at Wilton Academy and Nichols Latin School in Lewiston, Me. He 
was graduated from Tufts College with the degree of B. D. in 1884. 
His first pastorate was in Fitchburg, Mass., where a new church was 
built under his direction, and the strength of the parish greatly in- 
creased. From Fitchburg he went to Lowell, Mass., to become pastor 
of a large and influential church. Here lie married Vermeille A. Swan, 
and immediately after assumed the pastorate of the Massachusetts 
Avenue Universalist Church in Cambridge, Mass. Here he remained 
for eight years, when he accepted the pastorate of the Church of the 
Divine Paternity, New York city, where he has been since December, 
1902. In 1900 St. Lawrence University bestowed upon him the degree 
of D. D., and in 1905 Tufts College bestowed the degree of S. T. D. 
Dr. Hall is a trustee of St. Lawrence University, President of the 
Tufts College New York Alumni Association, a member of various 
clubs and societies, author of "Common People," and many articles and 
pamphlets. 

Doctor Hall served for several years as Chaplain of the Empire State 
Society, and at the Buffalo Congress was elected Chaplain General of 
the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and was 
reelected at the Baltimore Congress. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



The General Officers and the Following Trustees for State 
Societies, Elected at the Baltimore Congress. 

Alabama : Major William Frye Tebbetts, Mobile. 

Arizona : Isaac T. Stoddard, Phoenix. 

Arkansas: John M. Bracey, Little Rock. 

California: Pelhani W. Ames, care Alden Ames, 44 Brattle St., Boston. 

Colorado: J. H. Houghton, 1133 Lincoln St., Denver. 

Connecticut: Lewis Beers Curtis, Bridgeport. 

Delaware: John Bancroft, Wilmington. 

District of Columbia : Hon. Edward B. Moore, 2332 Columbia Road, 
Washington, D. C. 

Florida: J. H. Cross, Pensacola. 

France : Gen. Horace Porter, 277 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Hawaii: John Effinger, Honolulu. 

Idaho: Col. Marshall W. Wood, U. S. A., Boise. 

Illinois : James H. Gilbert, 108 La Salle St., Chicago. 

Indiana: Charles W. Moores, Lemcke Bldg., Indianapolis. 

Iowa : E. M. Wentworth, State Center. 

Kansas : John M. Meade, Topeka. 

Kentucky : George Hall Wilson, Todd Bldg., Louisville. 

Louisiana: Col. Peter F. Pescud, 818 Gravier St., New Orleans. 

Maine: Hon. Oliver G. Hall, Augusta. 

Maryland: Hon. Henry Stockbridge, 75 Gnnther Bldg., Baltimore. 

Massachusetts: Hon. Edward C. Battis, 81 Washington St., Salem. 

Michigan : Frank D. Taylor, 165 Woodward Ave., Detroit. 

Minnesota: Hon. Jesse A. Gregg, St. Paid. 

Mississippi: (Organized May 10, 1909, President, Judge Gordon Gar- 
land Lyell, Jackson.) 

Missouri: Rev. S. J. Niccolls, 8 Hortensc Place, St. Louis. 

Montana: Charles J. Brackett, Helena. 

Nebraska: Ralph W. Breckenridge, New York Life Bldg., Omaha. 

New Hampshire: Lion. Idenry M. Baker, 141 1 F St., Washington, D. C. 

New Jersey: John Jackson Hubbell, 810 Broad St., Newark. 

New Mexico: Dr. John W. Elder, Albuquerque. 

New York': Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, Peekskill. 

Ohio: Henry R. Baldwin, Youngstown. 

Oklahoma : Amos B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 

Oregon : Gen. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A., 3712 Hamilton St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania: Col. R. W. Guthrie, 43.} Diamond St., Pittsburg. 

Rhode Island: Henry V. A. Joslin, Providence. 

11 



12 SONS OF THIS A MICK I CAN REVOLUTION 

South Dakota: Capt. Theodore G. Carter, St. Peter, Minn. 
Tennessee: John H. De Witt, Nashville. 
Texas : W. F. Beers, Galveston. 
Utah : Chaunccy P. Overneld, Salt Lake City. 
Vermont: lion. Charles II. Darling, Burlington. 
Virginia: Gen. Charles J. Anderson, Richmond. 
Washington: Hon. Cornelius H. Hartford, Seattle. 
Wisconsin: Ellis B. Usher, Milwaukee. 
Wyoming: Hon. Timothy Farrar Burke, Cheyenne. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES, 1909. 
Appointed by the President General June 9, 1909. 



Standing Committees. 

Executive Committee: 

Morris B. Beardslcy,- President General, Chairman, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Henry Stockbridge, 75 Gunther Building, Baltimore, Md. 
Nelson A. McClary, 184 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
Commander J. II. Moore, U. S. N., 1755 P St., Washington, D. C. 
William Allen Marble, 397 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., Lowell, Mass. 
Lewis Beers Curtis, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Committee on Auditing and Finance: 

William A. DeCaindry, Chairman, 914 17th St., Washington, D. C. 

George F. Burgess, New Haven, Conn. 

George C. Sargent, Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Dr. George C. Batcheller, 130 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

James II. Gilbert, 108 La Salle- St., Chicago, 111. 

Committee on Credentials: 

John D. Vandercook, Chairman, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
Henry C. Sherwood, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Edward F. Arthurs, 628 Equitable Building, Baltimore, Md. 
Tennis D. Huntting, 220 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Christopher Rhodes, 290 Benefit St., Providence, R. I. 
Herman W. Fernberger, 1808 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Charles C. Follmer, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



nation ai, committees, i909 13 

Memorial. Committee: 

Major Moses Veale, Chairman, 727 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa 

Edward C. Battis, 81 Washington St., Salem, Mass. 

Arthur B. Bibbins, 2600 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Hon. Isaac W. Brooks, Torrington, Conn. 

Frederick H. Clarke, 24 Webster Place, East Orange, N. J. 

Hon. Edward A. Butler, Rockland, Maine. 

Arthur Preston Sumner, 17 Custom House St., Providence, R. I. 

Gen. Clinton L. Riggs, 903 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

Committee on Organization — North and West: 

Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, Chairman, 301 Jackson Building, Denver, 

Colo. 
Frank Merriam Keezcr, 610 Kittredge Building, Denver, Colo. 
Col. A. S. Hubbard, 2135 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Lieut. Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A., Boise, Idaho. 
Henry B. Patten, Cheyenne, Wyoming. 
George Williams Bates, 32 Buhl Building, Detroit, Mich. 
William T. Dewey, Montpelier, Vermont. 

Committee on Organization — South : 

Major William Frye Tebbetts, Chairman, 32 Concepcion St., 

Mobile, Ala. 
Commander J. H. Moore, U. S. N., 1755 P St., Washington, D. C. 
John H. Cross, Pensacola, Florida. 
R. C. Lipscomb, Spartanburg, S. C. 
Harry H. Trice, Norfolk, Va. 
Prof. Ernest Lagarde, Emmitsburg, Md. 
Hon. John S. Henderson, Salisbury, N. C. 
George H. Wilson, Louisville, Ky. 

Committee on Education: 

Col. Charles Lyman, Chairman, Treasury Dept, Washington, D. C. 

Rt. Rev. Edward G. Weed, Jacksonville, Florida. 

Seymour C. Loomis, New Haven, Conn. 

Thomas S. Brown, Bcrger Building, Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, Westchester County National Bank, 

Pcekskill, N. Y. 
Joseph G. Butler, Jr., Youngstown, Ohio. 
Hon. Edward S. Atwatcr, 78 Broad St., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Col. Peter F. Pescud, 818 Gravier St., New Orleans, La. 
Hon. Henry M. Baker, 141 1 F St., Washington, D. C. 



14 SONS OF Till' AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Special Committees. 

Flag Committee:: 

Gen. Thomas M. Vincent, U. S. A., Chairman, 1221 N St., 

Washington, D. C. 
Col. Arthur II. Price, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Hon. James M. Richardson, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Hon. Richard E. Sloan, Prescott, Arizona. 
Theo. H. Eaton, 2S Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
J. Staunton Moore, Richmond, Va. 
Louis Annin Ames, 220 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Committed on National Parks: 

William V. Cox, Chairman, Second National Bank, Wash., D. C. 

David L. Pierson, East Orange, N. J. 

Walter K. Watkins, n 10 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

Col. Ira II. Evans, Austin, Texas. 

Trueman G. Avery, Buffalo, N. Y. 

William E. English, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Press Committee: 

A. Howard Clark, Chairman, Smithsonian Institution, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Edwin S. Crandon, Evening Transcript, Boston, Mass. 

Dr. J. XV. Elder, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Clarence P. Wynne, 72T Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Horace M. Seaman, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Joseph F. Tuttle, Jr., 58 W. First Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Williams C. Harris, 610 Wayne County Savings Bank Building, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Committee on Pension and Muster Rous: 

Zebina Moses, Chairman, 711 H St., Washington, D. C. 

Major E. B. Tolman, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Col. R. W. Guthrie, 43.1 Diamond St., Pittsburgh, IVuna. 

Waller II ill Crockett, St. Albans, Vt. 

Dr. Francis II. Brown, 28 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Wallace McCamant, Portland, Oregon. 

I Rev. Jos. Brown Turner, Dover, Del. 

Committee on National Anthems: 

Rear Admiral George W. Baird, U. S. N., Chairman, 1515 R. I. 

Ave., Washington, D. C. 
Elmer M. Wcntworth, State Center, Iowa. 
Col. Albert I. Logan, 2839 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
William E. Chandler, The Hargrave, 72d St. W., New York, 

N. Y. 



NATIONAL, COMMITTEES, MjOCj 



'5 



Committee on Information i*or Aliens: 

Commander John IT. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman, 1755 P. St., 

Washington, D. C. 
Col. Charles Lyman, Treasury Department, Washington, D. C. 
A. Howard Clark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Publication Committee: 

Hon. Cornelius A. Pngsley, Peekskill, N. Y. 

Walter K. Watkins, mo Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

A. Howard Clark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Jonathan Trumbull, Norwich, Conn. 

Elbridge Drew Hadley, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Committee on Naval Records: 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman, 1755 P St., 
Washington, D. C. 

Rear Admiral George W. Baird, U. S. N„ 1505 R. I. Ave., 
Washington, D. C. 

Rear Admiral Colby M. Chester, U. S. N, 1736 K St., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Advisory Committee on Local Chapters: 

Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., Chairman, Lowell, Mass. 

Frank B. Steele, 414 White Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Col. Isaac F. Mack, Sandusky, Ohio. 

Nelson A. McClary, 184 La Salic St., Chicago, 111. 

Commander J. II. Moore, U. S. N., 1755 P St., Washington, D. C 

Committee on Jefferson Memorial: 

Morris B. Beardsley, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Henry Stock-bridge, 75 Gunther Building, Baltimore, Md. 
Caleb Clarke Magruder, Jr., 1018 Fourteenth St., Washington, 
D. C. 



PAST PRESIDENTS GENERAL. 

Lucius P. Deming, of Connecticut. 

Elected at Congress held in New York City, April 30, 1889. 
Dr. William Seward Webb, of Vermont. 

Elected at the Congress held in Louisville, April 30, 1S90, and re- 
elected at the Congress in Hartford, April 30, 1891. 
Col. A. S. Hubbard, Past President California Society. 

Entered on roll of Past Presidents General by unanimous vote of the 
Congress held in Louisville, April 30, 1890. 



i6 



SONS OF T1JIC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



General Horace Porter, LL. D., of New York. 

Elected at the Congress held in New York, April 30, 1892, and re- 
elected at the Congresses held in Chicago, June 16, 1893; in Washing- 
ton, April 30, 1894; in Boston, May 1, 1895, and in Richmond, April 30, 
1896. 

Gen. ALBERT M. Winn, Past President California Society. 

Entered on roll of Past Presidents General by vote of the Congress 
held in New York City, April 30, 1892. Died August 26, 1883. 

Hon. Edwin Shepard Barrett, of Massachusetts. 

Elected at the Congress held in Cleveland, April 30, 1897, and re- 
elected at the Congress held in Morristown, April 30, 1898. Died in 
office December 21, 1S98. 

Hon. Franklin Murphy, of New Jersey. 

Succeeded to the office upon the death of Hon. Edwin Shepard Bar- 
rett, in 1898, and elected at the Congress held in Detroit, May 2, 1899. 

Gen. Joseph C. Breckinridge, U. S. A., of Washington, D. C 

Elected at the Congress held in New York City, April 30 and May I, 
1900. 

Hon. Walter Seth Logan, of New York. 

Elected at the Congress held in Pittsburg, Pa., April 30 and May I, 
1901. Died July 19, 1906. 

Hon. Edwin WarfieLD, of Maryland. 

Elected at the Congress held in Washington, D. C, April 30 and May 
i, 1902. 

Gen. Edwin S. GREELEY, of Connecticut. 

Elected at the Congress held in New Haven, Conn., April 30 and May 
1, 1903. 

Hon. James Denton Hancock, of Pennsylvania. 

Elected at the Congress held in St. Louis, Mo., June 15 and 16, 1904. 

Gen. Francis Henry Appi.eton, of Massachusetts. 

Elected at the Congress held in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, May 
3, 1905. 

Hon. Cornelius Amory PugslEy, of New York. 

Elected at the Congress held in Faneuil Hall, Boston, May I, 1906. 

Nelson A. McCi.ary, of Illinois. 

Elected at the Congress held at Denver, Colorado, June 3 and 4, 1907. 

Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland. 

Elected at the Congress held at Buffalo, N. Y., April 30 and May 1, 
1008. 



GENERAL OFFICERS FROM 1889 to 1908. 









General Officers Elected at New York, April 30, 1889. 

President General Lucius P. Deming 

Vice-President General for Alabama Major G. B. West 

Vice-President General for Arkansas ....Col. S. W. Williams 

Vice-President General for California Col. A. S. Hubbard 

Vice-President General for Connecticut Mat, J. C. Kinney 

Vice-President General for Delaware A. J. Woodman 

Vice-President General for Illinois Bishop C. E. Cheney 

Vice-President General for Indiana William E. English 

Vice-President General for Kentucky Simon B. Buckner 

Vice-President General for Maine C. H. Denison 

Vice-President General for Maryland Rev. John G. Morris, D. D. 

Vice-President General for Massachusetts Edwin S. Barrett 

Vice-President General for Michigan Wm. H. Brearley 

Vice-President General for Minnesota John B. Sanborn 

Vice-President General for Missouri D. R. Francis 

Vice-President General for New Hampshire H. K. Slayton 

Vice-President General for New Jersey Robt. S. Green 

Vice-President General for New York Wm. PI. Arnoux 

Vice-President General for Ohio Rutherford B. Hayes 

Vice-President General for Rhode Island E. B. Andrews 

Vice-President General for South Carolina Wade Hampton 

Vice-President General for Tennessee Dr. D. C. Kelly 

Vice-President General for Vermont W. P. Dillingham 

Vice-President General for Virginia FlTZHUGH LEE 

Vice-President General for West Virginia John J. Jacob 

Vice-President General for Wisconsin Wm. D. Hoard 

Vice-President General for District of Columbia. Admiral D. D. Porter 

Vice-President General for France Edmond DE Lai'ayettE 

Secretary General LlEUT. J. C. CrEsap, U. S. N. 

Assistant Secretary General Ciias. J. King 

Assistant Secretary General Wir.SON J. Gill 

Assistant Secretary General William F. CrEGar 

Treasurer General James Otis 

Registrar General . L. L. TarrELL 

Chaplain General Ri;v. Timothy Dwigiit 

General Oeficers Elected at Louisville, Ky., April 30, 1800. 

President General Dr. Wm. Seward Webb 

Honorary Vice-President General.. .Admiral David D. Porter, U. S. N. 

Honorary Vice-President General Joseph E. Johnston 

2 17 



iS SONS 01' T1I.I3 AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Honorary Vice-President General .Edwin S. Barrett 

Vice-President General Lucius P. Deming 

Vice-President General Gov. Simon B. Buckner 

Vice-President General Wm. H. Arnoux 

Vice-President General Josiaii C. Pumpeley 

Vice-President General Dr. G. Brown Goode 

Secretary General Lieut. James C. Cresap, U. S. N. 

Treasurer General James Otis 

Registrar General Luther L. Tarbeee 

Historian General Wm. Francis Cregar 

Surgeon General . Wm. Thornton Parker, M. D. 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Hartford, Conn., Aprie 30, 1S91. 

President General Dr. Wm. Seward Webb 

Active Vice-President General Gen. Horace Porter 

Active Vice-President General Jonathan Trumbuel 

Active Vice-President General Gen. Bradley T. Johnson 

Active Vice-President General Judge Albert Edgerton 

Active Vice-President General Col. Champion S. Chase 

Honorary Vice-President General Rear Admiral Worden, U.S.N. 

Honorary Vice-President General Luther L. Tarbell 

Honorary Vice-Presdent General Wm. Wirt Henry 

Secretary General Lieut. James C Cresap, U. S. N. 

Treasurer General . James Otis 

Registrar General Dr. G. Brown -Goode 

Historian General Henry Hall 

Surgeon General Dr. Chas. E. Briggs 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at New York City, April 30, 1892. 

President General Gen. Horace Porter 

Vice-President General Jonathan Trumbull 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C Breckinridge, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General. . Henry M. ShEpard 

Vice-President General Gen. T. S. Peck 

Vice-President General Paul Revere 

Honorary Vice-President General ChauncEy M. DepEW 

Honorary Vice-President General Thos. F. Bayard 

Honorary Vice-President General Gen. Bradley T. Johnson 

Secretary General A. Howard Clark 

Treasurer General Charles Waldo Haskins 

Registrar General Dr. G. Brown Goode 

Historian General Henry Hall 

Surgeon General Dr. AurEEIUS BowEN 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. 















general, .officers from 1 889 to 1908 1 9 

General Officers Elected at Chicago, III., June 16, 1893. 

President General. GEN. Horace Porter 

Vice-President General Cn aunct.y M. DEpEW 

Vice-President General HENRY M. ShEPARD 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General Henry C. Robinson 

Secretary General Frankein Murphy 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

1 1 istorian General Henry Hall 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Ciias. E. Cheney, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Washington, D. C, April 30, 1894. 

President General Gen. I FoRACE Porter 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U.S.A. 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General Col. Wm. Ridgely Griffith 

Vice-President General Edwin S. Barrett 

Vice-President General. John Whitehead 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

1 1 istorian General Henry Hall 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Boston, Mass., May i, 1S95. 

President General , Gen. Horace Porter 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. 

Vice-President General Edwin Shepard Barrett 

Vice-President General John Whitehead 

Vice-President General Cushman K. Davis 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General Henry Hall 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Richmond, Va., April 30, 1896. 

President General Gen. Horace Porter 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. 

Vice-President General Edwin S. Barrett 

Vice-President General John Whitehead 

Vice-President General Col. Wm. Ridgely Griffith 



20 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Vice-President General Wm, Wirt Henry 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy 

Treasurer General ClIAS. W. HASKINS 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General Henry Hall 

Chaplain General R.T. Rev. Chas. E. CiiENEv, D. 1). 

General Officers Elected at Cleveland, Ohio, April 30, 1897. 

President General Edwin Shepard Barrett 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. 

Vice-President General John Whitehead 

Vice-President General James M. Richardson 

Vice-President General Cart. Sa m uel EbERLY Gross 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C Breckinridge, U. S. A, 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General PIenry Hall 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Morristown, N. J., April 30, 1898. 

President General Edwin Shepard Barrett 

Vice-President' General Franklin Murphy 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U.S.A. 

Vice-President General Cor,. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General James M. Richardson 

Vice-President General John Whitehead 

Secretary General Capt. Samuel Eberly Gross 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General . .Edwd. M. GallaudET, LP. D. 

Chaplain General Rev. Rueus W. Clark, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Detroit, Mich., May 2, 1899. 

President General Franklin Murphy 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. 

Vice- President Genera! Jon n Whitehead 

Vice-President General Tuos. W. Palmf.u 

Vice-President General Jonathan Trumbull 

Vice-President General James H. Anderson 

Secretary General Cart. Samuel ErErly Gross 

Treasurer General Charles Waldo 1 Easkins 

Registrar General A.I Ioward Clark 

Historian General Edwd. M. Gali.audET, EL. H. 

Chaplain General , Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D. 



I 









. -GENERAL OFFICERS FROM 1889 TO IQoS 21 

General Officers Elected at New York City, May i, 1900. 

President General Gen. J. C. BrRckinridge, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General Coe. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. 

Vice-President General James H. Giliu-rt 

Vice-President General Gen. Francis PI. Appleton 

V r ice-President General Gen. Edwin S. GrEELEy 

Vice-President General Howard De Haven Ross 

Secretary General . Xapt. Samuel EdEREY Gross 

Treasurer General Cornelius Amory Pugsley 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General Gen. Theodore S. Peck 

Chaplain General Rev. EthelbErt D. Warfield, D. D. 

Generae Officers Erected at Pittsburg, Penna., May i, 1901. 

President General WaeTER Seth Logan 

Vice-President General James Denton Hancock 

Vice-President General Thomas Pitts 

Vice-President General Horace Davis 

Vice-President General John Whitehead 

Vice-President General George A. Pearre 

Secretary General Capt. Samuel EbErly Gross 

Treasurer General Cornelius Amory Pugsley 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General George Williams Bates 

Chaplain General Rev. EtheldErt D. Wariteld, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at Washington, D. C, May i, 1902. 

President General Edwin Warfield 

Vice-President General Cornelius A. Pugsley 

Vice-President General Capt. Samuel EbErly Gross 

Vice-President General Noble D. Earner 

Vice-President General Howard De Haven Ross 

Vice-President General Col. Albert J. Logan 

Secretary General Charles Waldo Haskins 

Treasurer General Nathan WarrEN 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General George Williams Bates 

Chaplain General Rev. RuFUS W. Clark, D. D. 

Generae Officers Elected at New Haven, Conn., May i, 1903. 

President General Gen. Edwin S. GrEELEy 

Vice-President General . . . .- Major Jra H. Evans 

Vice-President General Dr. John W. BaynE 

Vice-President General Daniel M. Lord 

Vice-President General John J. Hubbell 



22 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Vice-President General Arthur VV. Dennis 

Secretary General Edward Payson Cone 

Treasurer General Nathan Warren 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Historian General George Williams Bates 

Chaplain General Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D. 

General Officers Elected at St. Louis, Mo., June 16, 1904. 

President General Hon. James Denton Hancock 

Vice-President General Gen. George Howell Shields 

Vice-President General John Paul Earnest 

Vice-President General Col. A. D. Cutler 

Vice-President General Edward Payson Cone 

Vice-President General Charles Kingsbury Miller 

Secretary General and Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Treasurer General Isaac W. BirdseyE 

Historian General George Williams Bates 

Chaplain General Rev. J. W. Atwood, D. D. 

General Officers Elected in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, 
May 3, 1905. 

President General Gen. Francis Henry Appleton 

Vice-President General Hon. Morris B. Beardsley 

Vice-President General Col. John C. Lewis 

Vice-President General Prof. Benjamin Blake Minor 

Vice-President General Hon. Henry Stockbridge 

Vice-President General Nelson A. McClary 

Secretary General and Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Treasurer General Isaac W. Birdseye 

Historian General Prof. W1W.IAM K. Wickes 

Chaplain General Rev. J. W. Atwood, D. D. 

General Officers Elected in Faneuil Hall, Boston, May 1, 1006. 

President General Hon. Cornelius A. PugslEy 

Vice-President General Moses GREELEY Parker, M. D. 

Vice-President General Hon. 1 Ienry Stockdkidge 

Vice-President General J Ion. Edward Anson Butucr 

Vice-President General Hon. Lunsford L. Lewis 

Vice-President General Andrew W. Bray 

Secretary General and Registrar General .A. Howard Clark 

Treasurer General Isaac W. Birdseye 

Historian General Prof. William K. Wickes 

Chaplain General Rev. J. W. Atwood, D. D. 



GENERAL OFFICERS FROM. 1 889 TO 1908 



23 



GENERAL Officers Elected at Denver, Colorado, June 4, 1907. 

President General Nelson A. McClary 

Vice-President General Trueman G. Avery 

Vice-President General William Hamilton Bayly 

Vice-President General Pelham W. Ames 

Vice-President General Gen. J. W. Whiting 

Vice-President General Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer 

Secretary General and Registrar General A. Howard Clark 

Treasurer General Willard Secor 

Historian General William Frederick Slocum, LL> D. 

Chaplain General Rev. J. Herman Randall 

General Officers Elected at Buffalo, N. Y., May i, 1908. 



President General Henry StockbridgE' 

Vice-President General George Williams Bates 

Vice-President General William James Van Patten 

Vice-President General John R. Webster 

Vice-President General Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer 

Vice-President General George Rowland Howe 

Secretary General and Registrar General A. PIoward Clark 

Treasurer General Willard Secor 

Historian General Walter Kendall Watkins 

Chaplain General Rev. Frank Oliver Hall, D. D. 



NATIONAL CHARTER. 



[Public— No. 214.] 

H. R. 15332. 
FIFTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; 

At the First Session, 

Begun and held at the City of Washington on Monday, the fourth day 
of December, one thousand nine hundred and five. 



AN ACT 



To Incorporate the National Society oe the Sons of the American 

Revolution. 



Be it enacted by the Semite and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That Francis Henry 
Appleton, of Massachusetts; Lucius P. Deming, of Connecticut; William 
Seward Webb, of Vermont; Horace Porter, of New York; Joseph C. 
Breckinridge, of Washington, District of Columbia; Franklin Murphy, 
of New Jersey; Walter S. Logan, of New York; Edwin Warfield, of 
Maryland; Edwin S. Greeley, of Connecticut: James D. Hancock, of 
Pennsylvania; Morris P. Beardsley, of Connecticut; John C. Lewis, of 
Kentucky; Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland; Nelson A. M.cClary, of 
Illinois; A. Howard Clark, of Washington, District of Columbia; Isaac 
W. Birdseye. of Connecticut; William K. Wickes, of New York; J. W. 
Atwood, of Ohio: J. W. Whiting, of Alabama; Ricardo E. Miner, of 
Arizona; Joseph M. Hill, of Arkansas; Alexander G. Eells. of Cali- 
fornia; Clarkson N. Guyer, of Colorado; Jonathan Trumbull, of Con- 
necticut; Thomas F. Bayard, of Delaware; William IT. Bayly, of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia; William S. Keyser, of Florida; Charles 

2J 



NATIONAL CIIAUTJCU 



25 









M. Cooke, of Hawaii; Inman H. Fowler, of Indiana; Eugene Secor, of 
Iowa; John I\l. Meade, of Kansas; Peter F. Pescud, of Louisiana; 
Waldo Pettengill, of Maine; James D. Igleh'art, of Maryland; Moses G. 

Parker, of Massachusetts; Rufus W. Clark, of Michigan; James C. 
Ilaynes, of Minnesota; Ashley Cabell, of Missouri; Ogclen A. South- 
mayd, of Montana; Amos Field, of Nebraska; Daniel C. Roberts, of 
New Hampshire; J. Franklin Fort, of New Jersey; William A. Marble, 
of New York; Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio; Henry H. Edwards, of Okla- 
homa; Thomas M. Anderson, of Oregon; William L. Jones, of Penn- 
sylvania; John E. Studley, of Rhode Island; Theodore G. Carter, of 
South Dakota; J. A. Cartwright, of Tennessee; I. M. Standifer, of 
Texas; Fred A. Hale, of Utah; Henry D. Ilolton, of Vermont; Luns- 
ford L. Lewis, of Virginia; Cornelius II. H'anford, of Washington; 
J. Franklin Pierce, of Wisconsin; Trueman G. Avery, of New York; 
William W. J. Warren, of New York; Plenry V. A. Joslin, of Rhode 
Island; John Paul Earnest, of Washington, District of Columbia; A. S. 
Hubbard, of California, and all such other persons as may from time to 
time be associated with them, and their successors, are hereby consti- 
tuted a body corporate and politic, in the city of Washington, in the 
District of Columbia, by the name of the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

Sec. 2. That the purposes and objects of said corporation are de- 
clared to be patriotic, historical, and educational, and shall include those 
intended or designed to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by their 
services or sacrifices during the war of the American Revolution, 
achieved the independence of the American people; to unite and pro- 
mote fellowship among their descendants; to inspire them and the com- 
munity at large with a more profound reverence for the principles of 
the Government founded by our forefathers; to encourage historical 
research in relation to the American Revolution; to acquire and pre- 
serve the records of the individual services of the patriots of the war, 
as well as documents, relics, and landmarks ; to mark the scenes of the 
Revolution by appropriate memorials; to celebrate the anniversaries of 
the prominent events of the war and of the Revolutionary period; to 
foster true patriotism; to maintain and extend the institutions of 
American freedom, and to carry out the purposes expressed in the pre- 
amble to the Constitution of our country and the injunctions of Wash- 
ington in his farewell address to the American people. 

SEC. 3. That said corporation shall have power to receive, purchase, 
hold, sell, and convey real and personal estate, so far only as may be 
necessary or convenient for its lawful purposes, to an amount not ex- 
ceeding at any one time in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars; 
to sue and be sued, complain and defend in any court; to adopt a com- 
mon seal, anil to alter the same at pleasure: to make and adopt a con- 
stitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations for admission, government, 
suspension, and expulsion of its members, and from time to time to 
alter and repeal such constitution, by-laws, rides, and regulations, and 
to adopt others in their places; to provide for the election of its officers 



jO SONS OF Till: AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

and to define their duties; to provide for State Societies or Chapters 
with rules for their conduct, and to regulate and provide for I lie man- 
agement, safe-keeping, and protection of its property and funds; 
Provided always, That such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regula- 
tions be not inconsistent with the laws of the United States or any of 
the States thereof. 

Sec. 4. That the property and affairs of said corporation shall be 
managed by not more than sixty nor less than forty trustees, who shall 
be elected annually at such time as shall be fixed in the by-laws, and at 
least one trustee shall be elected annually from a list of nominees to be 
made by each of the State Societies and submitted to this Society at 
least thirty days before the annual meeting, in accordance with general 
provisions regulating such nominations as may be adopted by this 
Society. 

Sec. 5. That the first meeting of this corporation shall be held on a 
call issued by any fifteen of the above-named corporators by a written 
notice signed by them, stating the time and place of meeting, addressed 
to each of the corporators personally named herein and deposited in 
the post-office at least five days before the day of meeting. 

Sec. 6. That this charter shall take effect upon its being accepted by a 
majority vote of the corporators named herein who shall be present at 
said meeting, or at any other meeting specially called for that purpose; 
and notice of such acceptance shall be given by said corporation by 
causing a certificate to that effect signed by its President and Secretary 
to be filed in the office of the Secretary of State. 

Sec 7. That Congress reserves the right to alter, amend, or repeal 
this act. 

J. G. Cannon, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Chas. W. Fairbanks, 
Vice-President of the United States 

and President of the Senate.. 

Approved, June 9, 1906. 

Theodore Roosevelt. 



CONSTITUTION 



OF 



The National Society of the Sons oi the 
American Revolution. 

(Adopted at the Denver Congress, June 3, 190J.) 



Article I.— Name. 

The name of this organization shall be "The National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution." 

Article II. — Purposes and Objects. 

The purposes and objects of this Society are declared to be patriotic, 
historical, and educational, and shall include those intended or designed 
to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by their services or sacrilices 
during the war of the American Revolution, achieved the independence 
of the American people ; to unite and promote fellowship among their 
descendants; to inspire them and the community at large with a more 
profound reverence for the principles of the Government founded by our 
forefathers; to encourage historical research in relation to the American 
Revolution; to acquire and preserve the records of the individual 
services of the patriots of the war, as well as documents, relics, and 
landmarks; to mark the scenes of the Revolution by appropriate memo- 
rials; to celebrate the anniversaries of the prominent events of the war 
and of the Revolutionary period; to foster true patriotism; to maintain 
and extend the institutions of American freedom, and to carry out the 
purposes expressed in the preamble of the Constitution of our country 
and the injunctions of Washington in his farewell address to the 
American people. 

Article III. — Membership. 

Slction 1. Any man shall be eligible to membership in the Society 
who, being of the age of twenty-one years or over, and a citizen of good 
repute in the community, is the lineal descendant of an ancestor who 
was at all times unfailing in his loyalty to, and rendered active service 
in, the cause of American Independence, either as an officer, soldier, 
seaman, marine, militiaman or minute man, in the armed forces of the 



28 



SUNS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Continental Congress., or of any one of the several Colonics or Suites. 
or as a signer of the Declaration oi Independence; or as a member of .. 

Committee of Safety or Correspondence ; or as a member of any Con- 
tinental, Provincial, or Colonial Congress or Legislature; or as a 
recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts of 
resistance to the authority of Great Britain. 

Suction 2. Applications for membership shall be made to any State 
Society, in duplicate, upon blank forms prescribed by the Board of 
Trustees, and shall in each case set forth the name, occupation and 
residence of the applicant, line of descent, and the name, residence and 
services of his ancestor or ancestors in the Revolution, from whom he- 
derives eligibility. 

The applicant shall make oath that the statements of his application 
are true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

Upon the approval of an application by the State Society, to which it 
is made, one copy shall be transmitted to the Registrar General of the 
National Society, who shall examine further the eligibility of the appli- 
cant. If satisfied that the member is not eligible, he shall return the 
application for correction. 

Until the State Society shall satisfy the Registrar General of the 
eligibility of such applicant, his name shall not be placed on the roll of 
membership. 

Suction 3. The official designation of the members of The National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution shall be "Com- 
patriots." 

Article IV. — National and State Societies. 

Section i. The National Society shall embrace all the members of the 
State Societies of the Sons of the American Revolution now existing or 
which may hereafter be established under this Constitution. 

Section 2. Whenever in any State or Territory in which a State 
Society does not exist, or in which a State Society has become inactive, 
or failed for two years to pay its annual dues to the National Society, 
fifteen or more persons duly qualified for membership in this Society may 
associate themselves as a State Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, and organize in accordance with this Constitution, they may 
be admitted by the Board of Trustees to the National Society as 

"The Society of the Sons of the American Revolution." and shall 

thereafter have exclusive local jurisdiction in the State or Territory or 
in the District in which they are organized, subject to the provisions of 
this Constitution, but this provision shall not be construed so as to 
exclude the admission of candidates residing in other States. 

Section 3. Each State Society shall judge of the qualifications of its 
members and of those proposed for membership, subject to the provis- 
ions of this Constitution, and shall regulate all matters pertaining to its 
own affairs. It shall have authority to establish local chapters within its 
own jurisdiction, and to endow the chapters with such power as it may 



NATIONAL CONSTITUTION 



29 



deem proper, not inconsistent with the charter of the National Society or 
with this Constitution. It shall have authority, after due notice and 
impartial trial, to expel any member who, by conduct unbecoming a 
gentleman, shall render himself unworthy to remain a member of -the 
Society. 

SECTION 4. Each State Society shall submit to the Annual Congress of 
the National Society a report, setting forth by name the additions, 
transfers and deaths, and any other changes in the membership and the 
progress of the State Society during the preceding year, and making 
such suggestions as it shall deem proper for the promotion of the 
objects of the National Society. 

Section 5. Whenever a member in good standing in his Society shall 
change his residence from the jurisdiction of the State Society of which 
he is a member to that of another, he shall lie entitled, if he so elects, 
to a certificate of honorable demission from his own State Society, 
in order that he may be transferred to the State Society to whose juris- 
diction he shall have changed his residence; provided, that his member- 
ship shall continue in the former until he shall have been elected a mem- 
ber of the latter. 

Each State Society shall, however, retain full control of the admis- 
sion of members by transfer. 

Section 6. Whenever the word "State'' occurs in this Constitution, it 
shall be held to include within its meaning the District of Columbia and 
the Territories of the United States. 

Section 7. A Society may be formed in any foreign country by fifteen 
or more persons who are eligible to membership under this Constitution, 
which shall bear the same relation to the National organization as the 
State Society, subject to the provisions of this Constitution. 



Article V.— Officers and Trustees. 

Section i. The General Officers of the National Society shall be a 
President General, five Vice-Presidents General, the order of seniority 
among whom shall be determined by lot at the time of their election, 
a Secretary General, Treasurer General, Registrar General, Historian 
General, and Chaplain General, who shall be elected by ballot by a vote 
of a majority of the members present and entitled to vote at the 
annual meeting of the Congress of the National Society, and shall hold 
office for one year and until their successors shall be elected. 

Section 2. The General Officers provided for in section 1, together 
with one member from each State Society, shall constitute the Board of 
Trustees of the National Society. Such Trustee from each of the 
several State Societies shall be elected annually at the Congress of the 
National Society, upon the nomination, or from a list of nominees, to be 
made by each of the State Societies and submitted to the National Society 
by the filing thereof with the Secretary of the National Society at least 
thirty days before the meeting of the Annual Congress of the National 
Society. And in the event that any one or more of the State Societies 



30 



SONS OK THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



shall omit or neglect to make such nomination or submit said list of 
nominees, by the time herein required, then the President of the State 
Society so in default, shall, virtute officii, be chosen as and become the 
representative of his State Society upon said Board. 

Section 3. The Board of Trustees shall have charge of, and be 
charged with the care and custody of all property belonging to the 
National Society, and to that end shall be vested with the powers con- 
ferred by section 3 of the Act of Incorporation of the National Society: 
Provided, hoivever, That it shall not have the power to sell, convey, or 
in anywise encumber any real estate belonging to the Society without 
the assent of three-fourths of the members of said Board. The Board 
of Trustees shall also have authority to adopt and promulgate the 
By-Laws of the National Society, to prescribe the duties of the General 
Officers, to provide the seal, to designate and make regulations for the 
issue of the insignia, and to transact the general business of the National 
Society during the intervals between the sessions of the Congress. 

Meetings of the Board of Trustees may be held at the call of the 
President General, or in case of his absence or inability, at the call of the 
Senior Vice-President General, certified by the Secretary General. 
Meetings shall be called at the request of seven members. At such 
meetings seven shall constitute a quorum. 

Section 4. An executive committee of seven, consisting of the Presi- 
dent General as chairman, and six members to be nominated by him and 
approved by the Board of Trustees, shall, in the interim between the 
meetings of the Board, transact such business as may be delegated to it 
by a Congress of the Society or the Board of Trustees. 



Article VI.— Dues. 

Each State Society shall pay annually to the Treasurer General, to 
defray the expenses of the National Society, fifty cents for each active 
member thereof, unless intermitted by the National Congress. 

All such dues shall be paid on or before the first day of April in each 
year for the ensuing year, in order to secure representation in the 
Congress of the National Society. 



Article VII. — Meetings and Elections. 

Section 1. The Annual Congress of the National Society for the 
election of the General Officers and for the transaction of business shall 
be held on the thirtieth day of April or on the first day of May in each 
year. The place of such meeting shall be designated by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the Congress may be called by the 
President General, and shall be called by him when directed so to (\o by 
the Board of Trustees, or whenever requested in writing so to do by at 
least live State Societies, on giving thirty days' notice, specifying the 
time and place of such meeting and the business to be transacted. 



N ATI N A I« v: N ST IT U T I O N 



3* 



Section' 3. The following shall be members of all such annual or 
■special meetings of the Congress, and shall be entitled to vote therein : 

(1) All the General Officers and the ex-Presidents General of the 
National Society. 

(2) The members of the Board of Trustees and the President or 
Senior Vice-President of each State Society. 

(3) One delegate at large from each State Society. 

(4) One delegate from every fifty members of the Society within a 
State and for a fraction of twenty-five or over. 

Section 4. After the adjournment of the Eighteenth Annual Congress 
of this Society, State Societies shall be represented at meetings of the 
National Society only by members of their own State Society, either 
duly elected, or who in the absence of regularly elected delegates, may 
be chosen by the regularly elected attending delegates of such State 
Society from the members of such State Society who may be present 
at any meeting of the National Society. 






Article VIII. — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be altered or amended at any meeting of the 
Congress of the National Society, provided that sixty days' notice of 
the proposed alterations or amendments, which shall first have been 
recommended by a State Society, or by a prior Congress, or by the 
Board of Trustees, or by the Executive Committee of the National 
Society, shall be sent by the Secretary General to the President of each 
State Society. 

A vote of two-thirds of those present shall be necessary to their 
adoption. 

Article IX. 



This Constitution shall take effect upon its adoption. 



BY-LAWS 



OF 



The National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

(Adopted at the Dower Congress, June 3, 190/.) 



Article I. — Election of Officers. 

All nominations of General Officers shall be made from the floor, and 
the election shall he by ballot. A majority shall elect. The nomina- 
tions may he acted upon directly or may be referred to a committee to 
examine and report. 

Article II.— Officers. 

The duties of the General Officers shall he such as usually appertain 
to their offices, and they shall have such other duties as are hereinafter 
imposed or shall be delegated to them by an annual Congress or by the 
Board of Trustees. 

They shall report at the annual meeting, and at such other limes as 
they may be required to do so by the Board of Trustees. 

Article III. — President General. 

Section i. The President General, in addition to his general duties, 
shall be ex officio chairman of the Board of Trustees, and of the Execu- 
tive Committee, and a member of every other Committee. 

Section 2. At each annual meeting he shall appoint the following 
standing committees : 

Committee on Auditing and Finance, 

Committee on Credentials, 

Memorial Committee, 

Committee on Organization, 

Committee on Education. 
The duties of the above committees shall be such as usually pertain to 
committees of like character, and such as may be defined by the Board 
of Trustees. 

Article IV. — Vice- Presidents General. 

Section i. In the absence of the President General, the Senior Vice- 
President General present shall preside at the Annual Meeting. 



32 



NATIONAL BY-LAWS 



33 



SECTION 2. In the prolonged absence or inability to act of the Presi- 
dent General, the executive authority shall be vested in the Vice-Presi- 
dents General in order of precedence. 

Article; V. — Secretary General. 

The Secretary General, in addition to his general duties, shall have 
charge of the seal, and give due notice of all meetings of the National 
Society or Board of Trustees. Tie shall give due notice to all General 
Officers and State Societies of all votes, orders and proceedings affecting 
or appertaining to their duties. He shall distribute all pamphlets, cir- 
culars, rosettes and supplies, as directed by the P>oard of Trustees. 

Article VI. — Treasurer General. 

Section i. The Treasurer General shall collect and receive the funds 
and securities of the National Society, lie shall deposit the same to the 
credit of the "Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and 
shall draw them thence for the use of the National Society, as directed 
by it or by the Board of Trustees, upon the order of the President 
General, countersigned by the Secretary General. His accounts shall be 
audited by a committee to be appointed at the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. He shall give bond for the safe custody and application of 
the funds, the cost of such bond to be borne by the National Society. 






Article VII.— Registrar General. 

The Registrar General shall keep a register of the names and dates of 
the election, resignation or death of all members of the several State 
Societies, and shall have the care and custody of all duplicate applica- 
tions for membership. He shall issue upon the requisition of the Secre- 
tary or Registrar of the several State Societies certificates of member- 
ship and insignia to every member entitled thereto, through such Secre- 
tary or Registrar. 

Article VIII.— -Historian General. 

The Historian General shall have the custody of all the historical and 
biographical collections of which the National Society may become pos- 
sessed and shall catalogue and arrange the same, and shall place the 
same in a fireproof repository for preservation. 

Article IX.— Chaplain General. 

The Chaplain General shall be a regularly ordained minister, and shall 
open and close all general meetings of the National Society with the 
services usual and proper on such occasions. 



34 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Article X.— State Societies. 

Every State Society shall — 

(i) Notify the Secretary General of the election and appointment of 
all officers, nominees for Board of Trustees and delegates. 

(2) Pay to the Treasurer General on the first day of March or 
within thirty days thereafter, the sum of fifty cents for each active mem- 
ber thereof. 

(3) Transmit to the Registrar General duplicate applications of all 
accepted members, and notify him of the resignation or death of all 
members thereof. 

Article XI. — Board or Trustees. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall prepare and carry out plans 
for promoting the objects and growth of the Society; shall generally 
superintend its interests, and shall execute such other duties as shall be 
committed to it at any meeting of the National Society. It shall have 
charge of the printing of the Diploma and the manufacturing of the 
Insignia, and shall determine the price at which the same shall be issued. 

Section 2. It shall have the authority to admit or reorganize as a 
State Society any association of fifteen or more persons duly qualified 
for membership in the Society. 

Section 3. It shall have power to fill any vacancy occurring among the 
General Officers, and an officer so elected shall act until the following 
annual election and until his successor shall be elected. 

Section 4. It shall have authority to make, alter and amend the 
By-Laws as hereinafter provided. 

Section 5. The President General may call meetings of the Board of 
Trustees at any time he may deem necessary, and shall call such meet- 
ings upon the written request of any five members thereof, provided that 
of any meeting, other than such as may be called during the session or 
immediately upon the adjournment of an annual or special Congress of 
the National Society, not less than five days' notice of the time and 
place of such meeting shall be given. 

Article XII. — Executive Committee. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee may be called at any time by 
the President General, and such meeting shall be called upon the written 
request of three members thereof. It shall lie the duty of the Executive 
Committee to exercise the powers, and perform the duties committed to 
it by any annual or special Congress or by the Board of Trustees; to 
control and supervise all arrangements for the holding of the annual or 
any special Congress, and the social and other functions connected there- 
with ; it shall upon the request of the proper committee of the National 
Society or of the Board of Trustees, assist, in the organization of new 
State Societies, and increasing the membership of weak State Societies, 
and for these purposes may incur its necessary expenses, limited to such 



; :< -■ f 









NATIONAL BY-LAWS 



35 



amounts as may be in the Treasury unappropriated, and not required for 
the current expenses of the National Society during the year. 

Attica XIII.-S.al. 1892-161 

The seal of the Society shall be two and three-eighths of an inch in 
diameter, charged with the figure of a minute man, grasping a musket 
in his right hand, and surrounded by a constellation of thirteen stars, 
who shall be depicted in the habit of a husbandman of the period of the 
American Revolution, and as in the act of deserting the plough for the 
service of his country; the whole encircled by a band three-eighths of 
an inch wide, within which shall appear the legend, "National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, organized April 30, 1889." 

Article XIV. — Certificates. 

All members of this Society, wherever admitted, shall be entitled to 
a certificate of membership duly attested by the President General, 
Secretary General and Registrar General, countersigned by the Presi- 
dent, Secretary, and Registrar of the State Society to which such mem- 
ber shall have been admitted. 



Article XV. — Insignia. 

The insignia of the Society shall comprise (1) a cross surmounted by 
an eagle in gold, (2) a rosette. 

Section i. The cross shall be of silver, with four arms, covered with 
white enamel and eight gold points, same size as a Chevalier's Cross of 
the Legion of Honor of France, with a gold medallion in the center 
bearing on the obverse a bust of Washington in profile, and on the 
reverse the figure of a minute man, surrounded by a ribbon enameled 
blue, with the motto "Libertas et Patria" on the obverse, and the legend 
"Sons of the American Revolution" on the reverse, both in letters of 
gold. The cross shall be surmounted by an eagle in gold and the whole 
decoration suspended from a ring of gold by a ribbon of deep blue, with 
white and buff edges, and may be worn by any member of the Society on 
ceremonial occasions only, and shall be carried on the left breast, or at 
the collar if an officer or Past President General of the National Society, 
or the President, active or past, of a State Society. 

Section 2. The rosette shall be seven-sixteenths of an inch in diam- 
eter, of usual pattern, displaying the colors of the Society, blue, white 
and buff, and may be worn by all members at discretion in the upper 
left-hand buttonhole of the coat. 

Article XVL— -Indebtedness. 

No debts shall be contracted on behalf of the National Society. 
Every obligation for the payment of money, except checks drawn 
against deposits, executed in the name or on behalf of the National 
Society shall be null and void. 



36 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Article XVII, — Order of Business of the Annual Congress. 

1. Calling the Congress to order by the President General. 

2. Opening prayer by the Chaplain General. 

3. Appointment of a Committee on Credentials. 

4. Remarks by the President General on condition and needs of the 
Society. 

5. Report of Committee on Credentials. 

6. Reading of minutes of the last Congress. 

7. Report of Board of Trustees. 

8. Reports of General Officers. 

9. Reports of standing committees. 

10. Reports of special committees. 

11. Reports of State Societies. 

12. Old and unfinished business. 

13. New business, including election of officers and Trustees. 

14. Adjournment. 

15. Provided, That for-a special purpose the Congress may, by a vote 
of two-thirds of those present and voting, suspend the above order of 
business. 

Article XVIII. — Amendments. 
These By-Laws may be altered or amended by a vote of three-fourths 
of the members present at any meeting of the Board of Trustees, notice 
thereof having been given at a previous meeting. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 















ALABAMA SOCIETY. 

30 Members. 
Organized June 27, 1903. Admitted into National Society, November 
18, 1903. 

Officers elected May 10, 1909. 

President, Wm. Frye Tebbetts, 32 Concepcion St Mobile 

Vice-President, Myron Titus Sprague, 107 Rapier St Mobile 

Vice-President, Charles H. Shawhan, 104 Dauphin St Mobile 

Vice-President, Robert Leroy Douglass, 54 St. Francis St Mobile 

Secretary-Treasurer, Alfred Edgar White Mobile 

Registrar, Dr. Wm. H. Oates, 59 No. Concepcion St Mobile 



ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

46 Members. 
Organized June 13, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Isaac T. Stoddard Phoenix 

Vice-President, Dr. Francis E. Shine. Bisbee 

Secretary, Clay F. Leonard Phoenix 

Treasurer, Lloyd B. Christy Phoenix 

Registrar, Carl T. Hayden Phoenix 

Historian, Geo. W. P. Hunt Globe 

Chaplain, Rev. J. W. Atwood Phoenix 



ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 

27 Members. 
Organized April 29, 1889. Annual meeting February 22. 



Officers elected February 22, 1909. 



President, Frank W. Rawles Little Rock 

Vice-President, R. W. Balch Little Rock 

Secretary-Registrar, Fay Hempstead Little Rock 

Treasurer, Philander Keep Roots Little Rock 



37 



38 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

398 Members. 

Instituted October 22, 1875, as Sons of Revolutionary Sires. Constitu- 
tion adopted August 7, 1S76. Name changed to Sons of the American 
Revolution March 22, 1890. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected April 19, 1909. 

President, R. M. Sims, Crocker Building San Francisco 

Senior Vice-President, T. A. Perkins, Mills Building. .. .San Francisco 

Junior Vice-President, O. D. Baldwin, 1000 Green St San Francisco 

Secretary, Dr. J. Mora Moss, 930 Green St San Francisco 

Registrar, Col. A. S. Hubbard, 2135 Sutter St San Francisco 

Treasurer, Edwin Bonnell, 101 Montgomery St San Francisco 

Marshal, Edward M. Adams, 2777 Pine St San Francisco 

Chapter Officers. 



LOS ANGEEES CHAPTER. 



President, Gen. J. G. Chandler, 120 South Grand Ave.; Vice-President, 
Dr. Norman Bridge, Temple Auditorium; Secretary and Treasurer, 
H. R. Warren, 545 Douglas Building. 



COLORADO SOCIETY. 

245 Members. 

Organized July 4, 1896. Annual meeting April 19, to commemorate 
the Battles of Lexington and Concord. 

Officers elected April 19, 1909. 

President, Rev. J. H. Houghton, 1133 Lincoln St Denver 

Vice-President, Lucius II. Rouse Colorado Springs 

Vice-President, George E. Home „ Greeley 

Vice-President, Clarkson N. Guyer Denver 

Vice-President, Charles K. McHarg Pueblo 

Vice-President, Charles PI. Wells Denver 

Secretary and Registrar, E. W. Milligan, 134G Clayton St Denver 

Treasurer, W. D. Wynkoop, Colorado Telephone Co Denver 

Plistorian, George L. Cannon, Jr., 1914 Pennsylvania Ave Denver 

Chaplain, Rev. R. B. Peery, 2209 California St Denver 

Chairman Board of Managers, Howard T. Vaille, Colo. Tele. Co. 

Denver 



! 

lb 



. 



STATE SOCIETIES 



Chapter Officers. 



39 



colorado springs chapter. organized april, 30, iqoc). 

32 Members. 

President, Henry Trowbridge, Mining Exchange Building; Vice- 
Presidents, W. W. Arnold, M. D., First National Bank Building, Frank 
H. Pettingell, Mining Exchange Building; Secretary, Martin Slaughter, 
23J j North Tejon St.; Treasurer, T. II. Gowdy, Gowdy-Simmons Print- 
ing Co.; Historian, Lucius H. Rouse, Mining Exchange Building; 
Chaplain, Rev. William S. Nichols, 705 North Nevada Ave. 

GREEEEY CHAPTER. ORGANIZED JUNE 6, I90S. 

22 Members. 

President, Harper Leiper; Vice-President, Col. C. A. White; Secre- 
tary, George E. Home; Treasurer, C. E. Littell; Historian, Col. C. A. 
White; Chaplain, Rev. W. A. Philips; Chairman of Board, John T. 
Jacobs. 

denver chapter. organized february 22, i909. 

191 Members. 

President, Chas. H. Wells, Denver Dry Goods Co. ; Vice-President, 
V. C. Stoddard, 712 Continental Building; Secretary, W. W. Kirby, 
Colburn Building, 15th and Colfax; Registrar, E. W. Milligan, 1346 
Clayton St.; Treasurer, W. D. Wynkoop, Colorado Telephone Co.; His- 
torian, Geo. L. Cannon, 1914 Penn. Ave. ; Chaplain, Rev. R. B. Peery, 
2209 California St.; Chairman Board of Managers, Frank M. Keezer, 
610 Kittredge Building. 



CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

1,059 Members. 

Organized April 2, 1SS9. Annual meeting May 10, to commemorate 
the capture of Fort Ticonderoga by a Connecticut expedition. 

Officers elected May 9, 1909. 

President, Lewis B. Curtis Bridgeport 

Vice-President, Rufns E. Holmes Winsted 

Secretary, Charles G. Stone, P. O. Box 847 .Hartford 

Treasurer, 1 lenry C. Sherwood Bridgeport 

Registrar, 1 lobart L. Hotchkiss New Haven 

Plistorian, Gen. Edward E. Bradley New Haven 

Chaplain, Rev. John De Pen Bridgeport 

Necrologist, Captain 1 ferny R. Jones New Hartford. 



40 



SONS 01? THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Chapter Officers. 

GENERAL DAVID HUMPHREYS BRANCH, NO. I, NEW HAVEN. 

President, Seymour C. Loomis ; Vice-President, William S. Wells; 
Secretary and Treasurer, William D. Scranton ; Historian, C. E. P. 
Sanford; Chaplain, Rt. Rev. E. S. Lines. 

CAPTAIN JOHN COUCH BRANCH, NO. 2, MERIDEN. 

President, H. Wales Lines; Viee : President, Walter Hubbard; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, Geo. M. Curtis; Historian, Judge J. P. Piatt; 
Chaplain, Rev. W. S. Perkins. 

GENERAL SILLIMAN BRANCH, NO. 3, BRIDGEPORT. 

Organized 1893. 

President, Rev. E. Livingston Wells; Vice-President, Rev. John De 

Peti; Secretary, Frederick A. Doolittle; Registrar, William A. Barnes; 

Treasurer, George C. Peet ; Historian, Dr. N. E. Wordin; Chaplain, 
Louis B. Silliman. 

ISRAEL PUTNAM BRANCH, NO. 4, NORWICH. 

Secretary, Henry F. Parker. 

NORWALK BRANCH, NO. 5. 

Secretary, Charles A. Ouintard. 

NATHAN HALE BRANCH, NO. 6, NEW LONDON. 

President, P. Leroy Plarwood ; Secretary, Carl J. Viets; Treasurer, 
Alfred Coit. 






DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

76 Members. 

Organized January 29, 1889. Annual meeting December 7, to com- 
memorate the ratification of the Federal Constitution by Delaware. 

Officers elected December 7, 1908. 

President, John Bancroft, Rockford, Park Drive Wilmington 

Vice-President, James PI. Hughes Dover 

Vice-President, George W. Marshall, M. D Milford 

Vice-President, Thomas F. Bayard, 115 Dupont Bldg Wilmington 

Secretary-Treasurer, David B. Ferris, 603 West 8th St .Wilmington 

Registrar-Historian, Lawrence B. Jones, 507 Broome St Wilmington 

Chaplain, Rev. Joseph Brown Turner Dover 



STATIC SOCIETIES 



41 






DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

(Washington, D. C.) 

534 Members. 
Organized April 19, 1S90. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Hon. Edward 13. Moore, 2332 Columbia Rd Washington 

Vice-President, Col. William B. Thompson, 1415 F St ..Washington 

Vice-President, Hon. James T. Du Bois, Dept. of State. .. .Washington 

Vice-President, William A. De Caindry, 914 17th St Washington 

Secretary, Chester M. Clark, Smithsonian Institution Washington 

Treasurer, Philip F. Larner, o[8 F St. N. W Washington 

Registrar, Albert D. Spangler, 72 S St. N. W Washington 

Assistant Registrar, Philip B, Goode, U. S. Patent Office. . .Washington 

Historian, Prof. Selden M. Fly, 50 S St. N. W Washington 

Librarian, Paul Brockett, Smithsonian Institution Washington 

Chaplain, Rev. Thomas S. Childs, D. D Chevy Chase, Md. 



FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

29 Members. 

Organized March 14, 1896. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate the birthday of Washington. 

Officers elected March 8, 1909. 

President, John II. Cross Pensacola 

Vice-President, T. V. Kessler Pensacola 

Secretary, R. E. Lee Cresap Pensacola 

Treasurer-Registrar, A. C. Blount, Jr Pensacola 

Chaplain, Rev. Percival H. Whaley Pensacola 



SOCIETY IN FRANCE. 

15 Members. 

Organized in Paris, France, September 16, 1897. Annual meeting 
Lexington Day, April 19. 

Officers. 

President, General Horace Porter, 277 Madison Ave New York 

Vice-President, Gaston de Sahune de la Fayette Paris 

Secretary (Vacancy) Paris 

Treasurer, J. D. Stickney Paris 

Registrar, Col. Charles Chaille-Long Paris 



42 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

89 Members. 

Organized June 17, 1S96. Annual meeting June 17, to commemorate 
the Battle of Bunker Hill. 

Officers elected June 17, 1908. 

President, George Robert Carter, 472 North Judd St Honolulu 

Vice-President, Dr. Charles Bryant Cooper, 1141 Alaska St. .. .Honolulu 

Secretary, Lyle Alexander Dickey, 35 South King St Honolulu 

Treasurer, Robert James Pratt, Box 414 Honolulu 

Registrar, Sidney Miller Ballou, Judiciary Building Honolulu 



l\ 



IDAHO SOCIETY. 

20 Members. 

Organized April 8, 1909. 

Officers. 

President, M. W. Wood, Lieut.-Col. U. S. A. (retired) Boise 

Vice-President, N. F. Kimball Weiser 

Vice-President, Dr. J. C. Davies Boise 

Secretary-Treasurer, F. S. Appclman, 1605 Washington St Boise 

Registrar, F. S. Harding Boise 

Historian-Chaplain, Rev. W. S. Hawkes Caldwell 

Chairman Board of Managers, R. W. Stubblefield Boise 



ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

544 Members. 

Organized January 14, 1890. Annual meeting December 3, to com- 
memorate the admission of Illinois into the Union. 



Officers elected December 3, 1908. 

President, John Shepherd, 159 La Salle St Chicago' 

First Vice-President, Porter B. Fitzgerald, 612 Rector Bldg Chicago 

Second Vice-President, Samuel E. Bliss, Metro. Tr. & Saw Bk. .Chicago 

Secretary, John D. Vandcrcook, Room 407, 108 La Salic St Chicago 

Treasurer, James H. Gilbert, 108 La Salle St Chicago 

Registrar-Historian, Fred F. Loomis Chicago 

Chaplain, Charles Herbert Young, 6451 Woodlawn Ave Chicago 

Sergcant-at-Arms, Llewellyn R. Atkins Chicago 






STATE SOCIETIES 43 

Chapter Officers. 

SPRINGFIELD CHAPTER, NO. I. ORGANIZED FEBRUARY I, 1897. 

President, Charles F. Mills; Secretary, Isaac R. Diller; Treasurer, 
Geo. M. Brinkerhoff. 

GEORGE ROGERS CLARK CHAPTER, NO. 2, BEOOMINGTON. ORGANIZED MARCH 

13, 1897. 

President, Charles L. Capen ; Vice-President, S. A. Thayer. 

EVANSTON CHAPTER, NO. 3. ORGANIZED APRIL 26, 1S97. 

President, Geo. M. Sargent; Secretary, Charles Pielson Spining. 

ROCK ISLAND CHAPTER, NO. 5. ORGANIZED APRIL 8, 1 898. 

President, II. C. Connelly; Secretary, Edward H. Gnyer. 

MONMOUTH CHAPTER, NO. 6. ORGANIZED DECEMBER 2J , IQ02. 

President, Victor H. Webb. 

OAK PARK CHAPTER, NO. 7. ORGANIZED JUNE, I903. 

President, Charles D. Richards; Vice-Presidents, George Butters,. 
Henry W. Austin; Secretary, George R. Hemingway; Historian, Dr. 
R. F. Johonnot; Treasurer, John D. Vandercook; Director, George D. 
Webb. 



INDIANA SOCIETY. 

161 Members. 

Organized January 15, 1890. Annual meeting February 25, to com- 
memorate the capture of Fort Sackville, Vincenncs, Ind., by Gen. George 
Rogers Clark. 

Officers elected February 25, 1909. 

President, William J. Brown, Indianapolis Stove Co Indianapolis 

First Vice-President, George O. Dix Indianapolis 

Second Vice-President, Frank Felter Huntington 

Third Vice-President, James Ellis Somes Terre Haute 

Secretary, Dr. Benjamin A. Richardson, 

208 Newton Claypool Building, Indianapolis 

Treasurer, Major Alexander Downing. Indianapolis 

Registrar, Rev. Geo. Paull T. Sargent, 2121 Talbott Ave. .. .Indianapolis 
Chaplain, Rev. Christopher Sargent Indianapolis 



44 SONS 01" THE; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Chapter Officers. 

ANTHONY WAYNE CHAPTER, NO. I, FORT WAYNE. 

President, James H. Haberly; Vice-President, George Tallman Ladd; 
Secretary, Horace G. Granger; Treasurer, Charles A. Fitch. 

HUNTINGTON CHAPTER. 

President, Charles McGrew; Vice-President, Frank Felter; Registrar, 
E. B. Heiney; Secretary, Morton Tuttle; Treasurer, Noble W. Scott. 

JOHN MORTON CHAPTER, TERRE HAUTE. 

President, James E. Somes; Vice-President, George Oscar Dix; 
Secretary, Charles T. Jewell; Treasurer, Horace C. Tune; Registrar and 
Historian, James B. Harris. 



IOWA SOCIETY. 

252 Members. 
Organized September 5, 1893. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected April 19, 1909. 

President, George Colvin Kennedy Waterloo 

First Vice-Prcndent, Hon. David Charles Mott Marengo 

Second Vice-President, Elmer Marston Wentworth State Center 

Treasurer, Leo Eugene Stevens Ottumwa 

Secretary, Capt. Elbridge Drew Hadley Des Moines 

Registrar-Historian, James Blaine Mason Des Moines 

Chaplain, Dr. David R. Dungan Des Moines 

Chapter Officers. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, CHARITON. 

President, Col. Warren Scott Dungan; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Elijah H. Lewis; Chaplain, Dr. David Roberts Dungan. 

PEN FRANKLIN CHAPTER, DES MOINLS. 

President, Elbridge Drew Hadley; Vice-President, Gershom Hyde 
Hill ; Secretary and Treasurer, Alson Secor. 

BUNKLR HILL CHAPTER, WATERLOO. 

President, Henry Whittemore Grout; First Vice-President, William 
Cummins Logan; Second Vice-President, Roger Leavitt; Secretary and 
Treasurer, George Colvin Kennedy; Historian, Dr. Lafayette Wallace 
Case. 









! 



STATIC SOCIETIES 45 

LEXINGTON CHAPTER, KEOKUK. 

President, Henry Boyclen Blood; Vice-President, Eugene Silas Baker; 
Secretary and Treasurer, David Brown Hamill. 

OTTUMWA CHAPTER, OTTUMWA. 

President, Hon. Joseph Henry Merrill; Vice-President, Frank Ben- 
jamin Clark; Secretary and Treasurer, George Francis Trotter. 

WASHINGTON CHAPTER, AMES. 

President, Herman Knapp; Vice-President, Edgar Williams Stanton; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Hamilton; Historian, Anson Marston. 

WOODBURY CHATTER, SIOUX CITY. 

Vice-President, John Church dishing Hoskins ; Secretary-Treasurer, 
George Lyman Baldwin. 



KANSAS SOCIETY. 

84 Members. 

Organized March 31, 1892. Annual meeting the third Wednesday in 
January. 

Officers elected January, 1909. 

President, John M. Meade Topeka 

Vice-President, Col. T. W. Harrison Topeka 

Secretary-Historian, Daniel W. Nell is Topeka 

Treasurer, David W. Norton Topeka 

Registrar, Joseph Lewis Eldridge Topeka 



KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 



70 Members. 



Organized April 8, 1889. Annual meeting October 19, to commemorate 

the surrender of Cornwallis. 

Officers elected October 19, 1908. 

President, George Hall Wilson, Todd Building Louisville 

Vice-President, Robert Rodes Burnam Richmond 

Secretary, William C. Sessions, Paul Jones Building Louisville 

Registrar, Benjamin La Bree, 543 E. Fourth St Newport 

Treasurer, George 'fwyman Wood, 430 W. Main St Louisville 

Historian, Charlton B. Rogers, Jr., Equitable Building Louisville 

Chaplain, Very Rev. Charles Ewell Craik, 

Christ Church Cathedral, Louisville 



46 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

83 Members. 
Organized May 16, JS93. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected December 12, 1908. 

President, Peter F. Pcscud, 818 Gravier St New Orleans 

First Vice-President, John Day New Orleans 

Second Vice-President, Edward Rightor New Orleans 

Third Vice-President, Charles Stewart Matthews Raceland 

State Secretary, Thomas Dabncy Dimitry, 

1224 St. Charles St., New Orleans 
Financial Secretary, Robert Turnbull Burwell, 

81S Gravier St., New Orleans 

Treasurer, Col. Charles A. Larendon, 815 Union St New Orleans 

Registrar, Louis D. Lagarde, Kennen Building New Orleans 

Historian, Henry Rightor, S18 Gravier St New Orleans 

Chaplain, John Talbot Sawyer, D. D Crowley 



MAINE SOCIETY. 

3S7 Members. 

Organized March 14, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Judge Oliver G. Hall Augusta 

Senior Vice-President, Henry R. Taylor Machias 

Vice-Presidents for Counties: Androscoggin, Edward P. Ricker, South 

Poland; Aroostook, Hon. Willis Blake Hall, Caribou; Cumberland, 

Hon. M. P. Frank, Portland; Franklin, Everett B. Morton, Farm- 

ington ; Hancock, Dr. Benjamin L. Noyes, Stonington ; Kennebec, 

Silas Adams, Waterville; Knox, Eugene M. Stubbs, Rockland; 

Lincoln, Eugene Prescott Webber, Westport; Oxford, Charles L. 

Hathaway, Norway; Penobscot, Henry N. Fairbanks, Bangor; 

Piscataquis, Hon. John F. Snrague, Monson ; Sagadahoc, William B. 

Kendall, Bowdoinham; Somerset, Charles F. Jones, Skowhegan; 

Waldo, Ralph H. Emery, Belfast; Washington, Paul D. Sargent, 

Machias; York, Lieut. Oliver P. Remick, Kittery. 

Secretary, Rev. Joseph Battcll Shepherd Portland 

Treasurer, Philip F. Turner Portland 

Registrar, Albert R. Stubbs Portland 

Librarian, Nathan Goold Portland 

Chaplain, Rev. Wm. G. Mann Cumberland Mills 

■ 



STATU SOCIICTIKS 



17 



MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

231 Members. 

Organized April 20, 1889. Annual meeting October 19, to commemor- 
ate the burning of the brig "Peggy Stuart" at Annapolis, October 19, 
1774. 

Officers elected October 21, 1908. 

President, George R. Gaither, 11 1 N. Charles St Baltimore 

First Vice-President, George W. Hyde, 225 E. Baltimore St.. .Baltimore 
Second Vice-President, Admiral Yates Stirling, 

209 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore 

Third Vice-President, James E. Hancock, 4 S. Ploward St Baltimore 

Fourth Vice-President, Thos. Murray Maynaidier, 

P. O. Ave. and Water St., Baltimore 

Fifth Vice-President, Gen. Clinton L. Riggs Baltimore 

Secretary, Dr. Jas. D. Iglehart, 211 W. Lanvale St Baltimore 

Treasurer, Ira II. Houghton, 12 E. Lexington St Baltimore 

Registrar, Edward F. Arthurs, 628 Equitable Bldg Baltimore 

Historian, Prof. Arthur B. Bibbins Baltimore 

Chaplain, Rev. George W. Dame Baltimore 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 
1,635 Members. 

Organized April 19, 1889. Annual meeting April 19, to commemorate 
Battles of Lexington and Concord. 

Officers elected April 19, 1909. 

President, Judge Edward Clarence B.attis, 8r Washington St Salem 

Vice-President, John Henry Manning (Died June 2, 1909) .... Pittsfield 

Vice-President, Luke Stearns Stowe Springfield 

Vice-President, Alfonso Scott Harris Brookline 

Secretary-Registrar, Herbert W. Kimball, 17 Mill; St Boston 

Treasurer, Charles Montravillc Green, M. D Boston 

Historian, Bng.-Gen, Philip Reade, U. S. A. (retired) Lowell 

Chaplain, Rev. Lewis Wilder Hicks. . Wcllesley 

Chapter Officers. 

OLD SALEM CHAPTER, SAI.EM. CHARTERED OCTOIIKR 3 1. T895. 

President, Frank A. Gardner, M. D. ; Vice-President. John Robinson; 
Second Vice-President, David Pingrcc ; Secretary, Samuel C. Lord; 
Treasurer, Edward C. Haiti's; Registrar, Andrew Nichols. 



48 SONS 01- THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

BOSTON CHAPTER. CHARTERED OCTOBER 31, 1S95. 

President, John S. Barrows; Vice-President, Frederic G. Bauer; 
Secretary, Edward J. Cox; Treasurer, George W. Austin; Historian, 
J. Albert Holmes. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, SPRINGFIELD. CHARTERED OCTOBER 31, 1S95. 

President, James H. Ripley; Vice-President, Henry A. Field; Secre- 
tary, Henry A. Booth; Treasurer, Henry D. Marsh; Registrar, Frank 
G. Tobcy; Historian, William F. Emerson; Chaplain, Rev. Newton M. 
Hall. 

OLD MIDDLESEX CHAPTER, LOWELL. CHARTERED JANUARY I/, 1896. 

President, Charles H. Conant ; Vice-President, Horace S. Bacon; 
Secretary, Francis N. Chase; Treasurer, Russell Fox; Registrar, Arthur 
D. Colby; Historian, George W. Putnam; Chaplain, Rev. Allan C. 
Ferrin. 

OI,D i'SSl T X CHAPTER, EYNN. CHARTERED FEBRUARY 7, 1896. 

President, Nathan M. Hawkes ; First Vice-President, Horace H. 
Atherton, Jr.; Second Vice-President, Henry F. Tapley; Secretary and 
Registrar, Luther Atwood; Treasurer, Webster Bruce; Historian, 
Charles H. Bangs, M. D. 

OLD COLONY CHAPTER, WHITMAN. CHARTERED APRIL 17, 1896. 

President, Isaac N. Nutter; Vice-President, Horatio F. Copeland, 
M. D.; Secretary, Charles E, Lovell, M. D. ; Treasurer, Randall W. 
Cook; Plistorian, Rev. Leonard B. Hatch. 

OLD SUl'l'OLK CHAPTER, CHELSEA. CHARTERED FEBRUARY 3, 1897. 

President, Channing Howard; Vice-President, Fred A. Pitcher; Sec- 
retary," Thomas U. Follansbee; Treasurer, Elmer H. Snow; Plistorian, 
Fred W. Snow. 

WORCLSTLR CHAPTER, WORCESTER. CHARTERED APRIL 2, 1S97. 

President, Alfred S. Roe; Vice-Presidents, George M. Rice, John C. 
Berry, M. D., Charles F. Mann; Secretary, Edward T. Mann; Treasu- 
rer, Winthrop Hammond; Historian, Charles O. Bachelor. 

NEWTOWNE CHAPTER, NEWTON. CHARTERED MAY 7, 1897. 

President, Frederic M. Mitchell; Vice-President, Harry B. Walker; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Frank E. Sawyer; Registrar, Samuel G. Web- 
ber, M. D. ; Historian, Edward J. Cox. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY CHAPTER, PITTSElLLD. CHARTERED JUNE 4, 1S97. 

President, Edward T. Slocum ; Vice-Presidents, James PI. Punderson, 
Roscoc C. Taft, Edward H. Brewer; Secretary and Registrar, Joseph E. 
Peirson; Treasurer, William C. Stevenson; Historian, James F. A. 
Adams, M. D. ; Chaplain, Rev. J. E. C. Sawyer. 



STATU SOCIETIES 



49 



I 



ROBERT TREAT PAINE CHAPTER, TAUNTON. CHARTERED SEPTEMBER 3, 1 897. 

President, Clarence F. Boydcn ; First Vice-President, F. Arthur Wal- 
ker; Second Vice-President, Everett S. Horton; Secretary, William M. 
Dean; Treasurer, Edward M. Hamlen; Registrar, James E. Seaver; 
Historian, Joshua E. Crane; Chaplain, Rev. George II. Johnson. 

MAI.DEN CHAPTER. CHARTERED APRIE 6, IQOO. 

President, Frank E. Woodward; First Vice-President, William H. 
Winship; Second Vice-President, Spencer T. Williams; Secretary, Wal- 
ter K. Watkins; Treasurer, Charles L. Parker; Historian, Charles D. 
Jones, M. D. 

CAMBRIDGE CHAPTER. CHARTERED MARCH 7, IQ02. 

President, John Amee ; Vice-President, Watson G. Cutter; Secretary, 
Shcpard Plowland ; Treasurer, Albert F. Amee; Plistorian, Edward B. 
Hutchinson. 

SETII POMEROY CHAPTER, NORTHAMPTON. CHARTERED OCTOBER 13, IOO5. 

President, Edwin Bruce Story; Vice-President, Frank N. Look; Sec- 
retary, Robert W. Lyman; Treasurer, George IT. Sergeant; Plistorian, 
William P. Cutter; Chaplain, Rev. Henry G. Smith, D. D. 

R0XBURY CHAPTER, BOSTON. CHARTERED APRIE 13, 1006. 

President, William L. Chadbournc; Vice-President, Charles E. Wig- 
gin; Secretary, William W. Bartlet; Treasurer, Arthur L. Foster; 
Historian, Plenry C. Whitcomb. 






MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

378 Members. 
Organized January 18, 1S90. Annual meeting April 15. 

Officers elected April 16, 1909. 

President, Frank D. Taylor, 165 Woodward Ave Detroit 

Vice-President, Albert M. Henry, 1202 Penobscot Bldg Detroit 

Secretary, Williams C. Harris, 610 Wayne Co. Sav. Bank Bldg., Detroit 

Treasurer, Enoch Smith, 145 Griswokl St Detroit 

Historian, Clarence M. Burton, 20 Home Bank Bldg Detroit 

Registrar, Raymond E. Van Syckle, 1022 Ford Bldg Detroit 

Chaplain, Rev. Lee S. McCollester, D. D., 655 John R. St Detroit 

Chapter Officers. 

WESTERN MICHIGAN CHAPTER, GRAND RAPIDS. 

President, William Judson; Vice-President, II. C. Angell ; Secretary, 
C. C. Follmer, 813 Mich. Trust Co. Bldg. 

4 



50 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

365 Members. 

Organized December 26, 1889. Annual meeting December 26, to com- 
memorate the anniversary of the Battle of Trenton. 

Officers elected December 26, 1908. 

President, Hon. Jesse A. Gregg St. Paul 

Vice-President, Ellis J. Westlake Minneapolis 

Vice-President, James P. Gribben St. Paul 

Secretary, Charles IT. Bronson, 48 East Fourth St . . .St. Paul 

Assistant Secretary, Ernest A. Countryman St. Paul 

Treasurer, Edward S. Stringer, 306 Nat. Ger. Am. Bank Bldg...St. Paul 

Registrar, Charles Stces St. Paul 

Historian, Rev. Edward C. Mitchell St. Paul 

Chaplain, Rev. M. D. Edwards, 1 ). D St. Paul 



MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 

18 Members. 

Organized May 10, 1909. 

President, Judge Gordon Garland Lyell. Jackson 

Vice-President, Hon. W. D. Anderson Tupelo 

Vice-President, McGehee Porter Aberdeen 

Vice-President, Col. Chalmers M. Williamson Jackson 

Secretary-Registrar, Win. H. Pullen, Mechanics' Bank Bldg Jackson 

Treasurer, Phillip Stevens Merrill Jackson 



MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

T04 Members. 

Organized April 23, 1SS0. Annual meeting March 4, to commemorate 
taking effect of the Constitution of the United States. Annual dinner 
April 19, to commemorate battles of Concord and Lexington. 

Officers elected March 4, 1909. 

President, Rev. S. J. Niccolls, 8 llortense Place St. Louis 

First Vice-President, las. E. With row, Court House St. Louis 

Second Vice-President, Isaac M. Mason, Commercial Bldg St. .Louis 

Third Vice-President, W. B. I lomer, 421 Olive St St. Louis 



Fourth Vice-President, John L. Robards 

Secretary, Robert E. Adrcon, 1932 N. Broadway, 



. . .1 Lanmbal 
. . . St. Louis 



i 

■.■•. 



STATIC SOCIETIES 51 

Treasurer, I. Shreve Carter, 516 Laclede Bldg St. Louis 

Registrar, Linn Paine, Mcrmod-Jaccard Bldg St. Louis 

Historian, Jno. M. Fulton, Security Bldg St. Louis 

Chaplain, Rev. W. W. Boyd, 300 N. Fourth St St. Louis 

Chapter Officers. 

KANSAS CITY CHAPTER. 

36 Members. 

President, George P. Gross; Vice-President, Wm. H. Williams; Sec- 
retary, F. C. Spalding; Treasurer, W. H. IT. Tainter; Historian, James 
M. Greenwood; Registrar, John H. Crttm, 

ST. LOUIS CHAPTER. 

j6 Members. 
(Officers same as State Society.) 



MONTANA SOCIETY. 

41 Members. 
Organized June 5, 1894. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Charles Joseph Brackett Helena 

Vice-President, William Allen Chessman 1 Ielena 

Secretary, Leslie Sulgrove Helena 

Treasurer, Orin T. Walker Helena 

Registrar, William Rush Burroughs Helena 

Historian, Oliver Turnbull Crane Helena 

Librarian, Henry C. Arnold Helena 

Chaplain, Henry Nichols Blake Helena 



NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 
113 Members. 

Organized April 26, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Ralph W. Breckenridge, Suite 711 N. Y. Life Bldg... Omaha 

Senior Vice-President, Paul W. Kuhns Omaha 

Junior Vice-President, Edward R. Gurney Omaha 

Secretary, James Richardson, 902 Jackson St Omaha 

Treasurer, John F. Flack, City Savings Bank Omaha 

Registrar, Freeman C. Bullock, P. O. Box 738 Omaha 

Historian, Pressly J. Barr Omaha 



52 SONS OF TIUv AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

309 Members. 
Organized April 24, 1889. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected May 14, 1908. 

President, Henry M. Baker Bow Mills 

Vice-President, Oliver E. Branch Manchester 

Vice-President, Franklin W. McKinley Manchester 

Vice-President, Henry H. Metcalf . Concord 

Secretary and Treasurer, Howard F. Hill, 69 S. Main St Concord 

Historian, Plenry H. Metcalf Concord 

Registrar, William P. Fiske Concord 

Chaplain, Rev. Lucius Waterman, D. D Hanover 

Chapter Officers. 

KEENE CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Hon. James S. Taft; Vice-President, Rev. Alfred H. 
Wheeler; Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Gale Shedd; Historian, 
Rev. Josiah E. Seward, D. D. 



NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

396 Members. 

Organized March 7, 1889. Annual meeting usually January 3 (Battle 
of Princeton) or at such other time as the Society at any annual meeting 
J may designate. 

Officers elected January 3, 1909. 

President, Hon. Edward S. Atwater, yS Broad St Elizabeth 

First Vice-President, Thomas W. Williams, 

78 North Arlington Ave., East Orange 
Second Vice-President, Gen. James F. Rusling, 224 E. State St., Trenton 

Secretary, Col. J. R. Mullikin, 312 Belleville Ave Newark 

Treasurer, Capt. Oscar H. Condit East Orange 

Registrar, John Jackson Hubbell, 810 Broad St Newark 

Historian, Prof. William C. Armstrong New Brunswick 

Chaplain, Rev. John Hobart Egbert Irvington 

Chapter Officers. 

EUZABETHTOWN CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Hon. George T. Parrot; Vice-President, Charles Sy mines 
Kiggins ; Secretary, Frank C. Ogden ; Treasurer, Moses M. Crane; 
Historian, Miller C. Earl; Chaplain, Rev. William Force Whitaker. 



STAT J; SOCIETIES 



ORANGE CHAPTER, NO. 2. 



53 



President, John Lenord Merrill; Vice-President, Frederick H. Clarke; 
Treasurer, Francis Gilbert; Secretary, Philip Osborne; Historian, .David 
I,, Pierson. 

The Orange Chapter also includes residents of Montclair, Glen Ridge, 
and Bloomfield. 



NEW MEXICO SOCIETY. 

22 Members. 

Organized December 26, 1908. 

Officers elected December 26, 1908. 

President, Dr. John W. Elder Albuquerque 

Vice-President, Harold Hurd Roswell 

Vice-President, A. M. Edwards Farmington 

Vice-President, Pitt Ross Albuquerque 

Secretary, George M. Campfield Albuquerque 

Registrar, Frank W. Clancy Albuquerque 

I listorian, George S. Klock . .Albuquerque 

Treasurer, O. A. Matson Albuquerque 

Chaplain, C. C. Bateman, U. S. A Fort Bayard 



NEW YORK. 
THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

1,328 Members. 

Organized February 11, 1890. Annual meeting March 17. 

Officers elected April 20, 1909. 

President, Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley Peekskill 

First Vice-President, Richard T. Davies, 143 Liberty St New York 

Second Vice-President, John H. Burroughs, 1416 Pacific St. . .Brooklyn 

Third Vice-President, Henry M. Clarke Elmira 

Secretary, Louis Annin Ames, 220 Broadway New York 

Treasurer, James De La Montanyc, 220 Broadway New York 

Registrar, Teunis D. Huntting, 220 Broadway .New York 

Historian, Josiah C. Pumpelly, 542 West 112th St New York 

Chaplain, Rev. Chas. L. Goodell, D. D., 136 West 130th St... New York 

Chapter Officers, 1909. 

ADIRONDACK CIIAPTl'.R, FORT EDWARD. 

President, Vacant; Secretary, Archibald S. Derby. 

DINGIIAMTON CHAPTER, BINGHAMTON. 
President, Gen. E. Franc Jones; Secretary, A. J. McClary. 



54 



SONS 01- Till'; AMERICAN KKYOIAJ'f ION 



BUPFAEO CHAPTER, BUl"I-At,0 

President, Trtieman C7. Avery; Secretary, Frank B. Steele. 

FORT-JOHNSTOWN CHAPTER, JOHNSTOWN. 

President, H'arwood Dudley; Secretary, Vacant. 

CANSEVOOUT-WIRPETT CHAPTER, ROME. 

President, Chas. C. Hopkins ; Secretary, G. Lennemann Prescott. 

HUNTINGTON CHAPTER, HUNTINGTON 

President, Douglass Conklin; Secretary, E. Stanley Jarvis. 

MOHAWK VAI,I,EY CHAPTER, HERKIMER 

President, Hon. Abram B. Steele; Secretary, F. W. Cristman. 

NEWBURGH CHAPTER, NEWBURGIT. 

President, Dr. Wra. V. Randall; Secretary, Nelson B. Lent. 

NEWTOWN-BATTI.E CHAPTER, ELMIRA. 

President, Harry N. Hoffman; Secretary, E. K. Tidd. 

THE PAINTED POST CHAPTER, CORNING. 

President, Arthur A. Houghton; Secretary, John L. Chatfield. 

ROCHESTER CHAPTER, ROCHESTER 

President, Vacant ; Secretary, Vacant. 

SARATOGA CHAPTER, SARATOGA SPRINGS. 

President, Thomas R. Kneil ; Secretary, Dr. Earl H. King. 

SYRACUSE CHAPTER, SYRACUSE. 

President, Newell B. Woodworth; Secretary, Chas. C. Cook. 

YONKERS CHAPTER, Y0NKERS 

President, Hampton D. Ewing; Secretary, Vacant. 






OHIO SOCIETY. 

471 Members. 

Organized April 11-22, 1889. Annual meeting April 19, to commemor- 
ate the Battle of Lexington. 

Permanent headquarters of the Society at Columbus under constitu- 
tional provision. 



h 



STATlv SOCIltTllJS 55 

Officers elected April 19, 1909. 

President, William II. Marlatt, Society for Savings Bldg Cleveland 

Vice-President, Dr. William F. Peirce Gambier 

Secretary, Hugh Huntington, 20 E. Broad St Columbus 

Registrar, Col. William L. Curry Columbus 

Treasurer, Stimpson G. Harvey Toledo 

Historian, William A. Taylor Columbus 

Chaplain, Rev. Henry Jerome Simpson. Xenia 

Chapter Officers. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CHAPTER, COLUMBUS. 

President, Dr. James U. Barnhill; Vice-President, Col. W. S. Potter; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Hugh Huntington; Registrar, Major Mac. L,ce 
Wilson; Historian, Dr. Williard B. Carpenter. 

WESTERN RESERVE SOCIETY, CLEVELAND. 

President, Col. Isaac F. Mack, Sandusky; Vice-Presidents, James M. 
Richardson, Cleveland, A. T. Brewer, Cleveland, Edward P. Otis, Ak- 
ron, A. G. Reynolds, Painesville; Secretary, Hubert B. Fuller, 528 Wil- 
liamson Bldg., Cleveland; Treasurer, Win. J. Norton, 321 Garfield Bldg., 
Cleveland; Registrar, F. W. Treadway, Cleveland; Historian, Oliver 
K. Brooks, Cleveland; Chaplain, Rev. Frederick B. Avery, Cleveland. 

ANTHONY WAYNE CHAPTER, TOLEDO 

President, Geo. E. Pomeroy; Vice-President, Wm. S. Walbridge; 
Second Vice-President, Frederick J. Flagg; Secretary, Erskine H. Pot- 
ter; Treasurer, Stimpson G. Harvey; Registrar, Wm. H. Moor; His- 
torian, Dr. Wm. A. Dickey; Chaplain, Rev. R. D. Hollington. 

NATHAN HALE CHAPTER, Y0UNGST0WN 

President, Joseph G. Butler, Jr.; First Vice-President, Bales M. 
Campbell; Second Vice-President, John S. Lett; Secretary, Chas. A. 
Ensign; Treasurer, John J. Brant; Registrar and Historian, Henry R. 
Baldwin. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, NEWARK 

President, Robert Mason Davidson; Vice-President, Edward Kibler; 
Secretary, Frederick H. King; Treasurer, Channing M. Thompson; 
Registrar, Charles Hempstead. 

SIMON KENTON CHAPTER, KENTON. 

1-resident, Judge Artcmas B. Johnson; First Vice-President, Dr. Jesse 
Snodgrass; Second Vice-President, Dr. David P. Philips; Secretary, 
Hugh E. Pearce; Treasurer, Hugh L. Runkle; Registrar, Austin L. 
McKitrick; Historian, George E. Crane; Chaplain, Abishai Woodward. 



sc 



SONS OI f TITIC AMIyKICAN RlCVOkUTION 



CINCINNATI CHAPTER. 

President, Edward P. Whallon; First Vice-President, Carroll Brook- 
field; Second Vice-President, John Uri Lloyd; Secretary and Treasurer, 
John D. Follett. 

NATHANAEE GREENE CHAPTER, XENIA 

President, Charles C. Shearer; Vice-President, James E. Galloway; 
Corresponding Secretary, William A. Galloway; Recording Secretary, 
Finley D. Torrence; Registrar, David M. Stewart; Historian, Clark M. 
Galloway. 






OKLAHOMA SOCIETY. 

30 Members. 

Organized February 22, 1905. Admitted into the National Society 
May 18, 1905. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Col. Arthur H. Price Oklahoma City 

Vice-President, Charles Henry Parker Enid 

Secretary, Dr. L. Haynes Buxton Oklahoma City 

Treasurer, Frederick Brasted Oklahoma City 

Registrar, Robert P. Carpenter Oklahoma City 

Historian, Joseph B. Thoburn Oklahoma City 

Chaplain, Carter Plelm Jones, D. D Oklahoma City 



OREGON SOCIETY. 

85 Members. 

Organized June 6, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to commemor- 
ate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Wallace McCamant, Concord Building Portland 

Vice-President, Tyler Woodward, 1st and Yamhill »Sts Portland 

Secretary, B. A. Thaxter, .143 Eleventh St Portland 

Treasurer, A. A. T.indsley, Sherlock Building Portland 

Registrar, W. II. Chapin, Chamber (if Commerce Bldg Portland 



PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

536 Members. 
Organized November 23, 1893. Annual meeting February 22. 



STATJ-; socii?/ni$s 57 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Rev. W. A. Stanton, 6340 Marchand St Pittsburg 

Vice-President, Major Moses Veale, 7^7 Walnut St Philadelphia 

Vice- President, Col. R. W. Guthrie, 434 Diamond St Pittsburg 

Vice-President, Albert A. Home, 5th Ave. and Penn St. Pittsburg 

Vice-President, William L. Jones, 243 4th Ave Pittsburg 

Vice-President, Thomas Stephen Brown, Bergcr Building Pittsburg 

Vice-President, Edward King New Castle 

Vice-President, Samuel D. Ilubley, 327 Pacific Ave Pittsburg 

Secretary, Frank G. Paulson, 515 Wood St Pittsburg 

Registrar, Francis Armstrong, Jr., 407 Oakland Ave Pittsburg 

Treasurer, Ogden Russell, Third National Bank Pittsburg 

Historian, Thomas Stephen Brown, 1110 Berger Building Pittsburg 

Chaplain, Rev. Stephen A. Hunter, 914 5th Ave Pittsburg 

Chapter Officers. 

WAYNE CHAPTER, ERIE. CHARTERED l80Q. 

President, Dr. David N. Dennis; Vice-President, John W. Little; 
Secretary, George Burton; Treasurer, William Spencer; Registrar, 
Douglas Benson ; Historian, Charles S. Clarke. 

NEW CASTLE CHAPTER. 

President, William A. Stritmater; Vice-President, Dr. W. E. Jack- 
son; Secretary, F. R. Woods; Treasurer, IT. A. Wilkinson; Registrar, 
J. S. Du Shane. 

PHILADELPHIA CHAPTER. 

President, Moses Veale, 727 Walnut St.; Vice-President, Dr. John V. 
Allen, 4637 Frankford Ave.; Secretary and Treasurer, Herman W. 
Fernberger, 1808 N. Broad St.; Registrar, Thomas Wynne, 5100 Lan- 
caster Ave.; Historian, Clarence P. Wynne, N. E. Cor. 7th and Walnut 

Streets. 



RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

301 Members. 
Organized February 1, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, William Chace Greene South Kingstown 

Vice-President, Frederic Willard Easton Pawtucket 

Secretary, Christopher Rhodes, 290 Benefit St Providence 

Treasurer, Arthur Preston Sumner, 29 Weybosset St ..Providence 

Registrar, Francis Eliot Bates Oak Lawn 



58 SONS ol- TJ.IJ3 AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Historian, Edwin Aylesworth Burlingamc, 359 Brook St Providence- 
Chaplain, Rev. Samuel Pleber Webb, 21 Adelaide Ave Providence 

Poet, John Prescott Farnsworth, 42 Tobey St Providence 

Chapter Officers, 1909. 

BRISTOL CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Henry M. Gibson; Vice-President, John H. Merrill; Sec- 
retary, Joseph F. Farrally; Treasurer, Frederic F. Gladding; Historian, 
George U. Arnold; Poet, William L. Manchester. 

PROVIDENCE CHAPTER NO. 2. 

President, Robert P. Brown; Vice-President, Frederic W. Haslon; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Arthur P. Sumner; Historian, Wilfred H. 
Munro. 

PAWTUCKET CHAPTER, NO. 3. 

President, Frederic VV. Eastern; Vice-President, Theodore E. Dexter; 
Secretary, Frederic E. Smith, Jr. 

KENT COUNTY CHAPTER, NO. 4, 

President, Howard V. Allen; Vice-President, Thomas W. Chace ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Nathaniel H. Brown; Registrar, William A. 
Browning; Historian, Herbert M. Clarke; Chaplain, Rev. Charles F. 
Roper. 

SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

io Members. 

Organized April 24, 1S99. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers. 

President and Registrar, Capt. Theodore G. Carter St. Peter 

Vice-President, Fred 1 1 . Rugg Rapid City 

Secretary and Treasurer, A. D. Wilson Deadwood 

Chaplain, Rev. E. E. Clough, D. D Deadwood 



TENNESSEE SOCIETY. 
96 Members. 

Organized December 2, 1889. Annual meeting October 7, to com- 
memorate Battle of Kings Mountain. 



Officers elected April, 1909. 

President, L. R. Eastman Nashville 

Vice-President, John W. Faxon Chattanooga 



STATE SOCIETIES 59 

Vice- President, A. A. Lipscomb Columbia 

Vice-President, Jos. W. McGall Huntingdon 

Secretary, Roger Eastman Nashville 

Treasurer, W. E. IVIetzger Nashville 

Registrar, Jno. C. Brown Nashville 

Historian, Leland Plume Nashville 



TEXAS SOCIETY. 

86 Members. 
Organized December 8, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected, 1908. 

President, W, F. Beers Galveston 

Senior Vice-President, Gen. J. R. Waites Houston 

Second Vice-President, Duval West .San Antonio 

Secretary, Clay S. Briggs Galveston 

Treasurer, Wilber IT. Young. Austin 

Registrar and Historian, James T. ITuffmaster Galveston 

Chaplain, Rev. E. B. Wright Austin 



UTAH SOCIETY. 
76 Members. 

Organized January 29, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, igog. 

President, Chauncey P. Overfield Salt Lake City 

Vice-President, Robert Welles Fisher. Salt Lake City 

Secretary, Gordon Lines Hutchins Salt Lake City 

Treasurer, Frederic Albert Hale Salt Lake City 

Registrar, William Dalton Ncal Salt Lake City 

Historian, John Walcott Thompson Salt Lake City 

Chaplain, Joseph Kimball Salt Lake City 



VERMONT SOCIETY. 
280 Members. 

Organized April 2, 1S89. Annual meeting second Wednesday in No- 
vember. 



60 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Officers elected November, 1908. 

President, Charles Hial Darling Burlington 

Vice-President, William Tarbox Dewey . . Montpelier 

Secretary, Walter Hill Crockett St. Albans 

Treasurer, Clarence Lucius Smith Burlington 

Registrar, Henry Leonard Stillson Bennington 

Historian, Walter Hill Crockett St. Albans 

Chaplain, Rev. Homer Abial Flint Montpelier 



: 



VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

66 Members. 

Organized July 7, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to commemor- 
ate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Judge Lunsford L. Lewis Richmond 

Vice-President, J. Staunton Moore Richmond 

Vice-President, Arthur B. Clarke Richmond 

Vice-President, Gen. Charles J. Anderson Richmond 

Secretary and Registrar and Historian, 

Dr. Robert A. Brock, 517 W. Marshall St., Richmond 

Treasurer, Earnest W. Moore, 2606 E. Broad St Richmond 

Chaplain, Norton P. Savage Richmond 

Chapter Officers. 

TIDEWATER CHAPTER, NO. I, NORFOLK. 

President, Tench F. Tilghman ; Secretary, Frederick Aunspaugh; 
Treasurer, Dr. L. T. Royster; Registrar, Harry H. Trice. 



WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 

203 Members. 
Organized June 17, 1895. Annual meeting Fcbriiarv 22. 

i ■ 

Officers elected February 22, 1909. 

President, Hon. Cornelius H. Hanford Seattle 

First Vice-President, Overton G. Ellis Tacoma 

Second Vice-President, Charles T. Doolittle .Spokane 

Third Vice-President, Leander T. Turner Seattle 

vSecretary, Augustus Armstrong, 620 New York Bldg Seattle 



I 



STAT£ SOCIETIES 6l 

Treasurer, Augustus V. Bell, 643 New York Bldg Seattle 

Registrar, Robert C. Saunders, Suite 27 Scheuerman Blk Seattle 

Historian, Ovid A. Byers Seattle 

Chaplain, Edward Lincoln Smith, D. D .Seattle 

Chapter Officers. 

SEATTLE CHAPTER, 20. MEM HERS. 

President, Everett Smith; Vice-President, Hugh A. Garland; Secre- 
tary, H. R. Thompson; Treasurer, F. H. Crowell; Historian, W. E. 
Starr; Chaplain, Rev. Edward Lincoln Smith. 

TACOMA CHAPTER, 20 MEMBERS. 

President, E. B. Judson; Vice-President, R. G. Walker; Secretary, 
Benjamin L,, Harvey; Treasurer, F. L. Davis; Registrar, 11. G. Row- 
land. 

SPOKANE CHAPTER, 2"] MEMBERS, 

President, L. L. Rand; Vice-President, Charles M. Deland; Secretary 
and Treasurer, Thomas H. Brewer; Registrar, J. Melvin Thomas. 



WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

176 Members. 

Organized February 25, 1890. Annual meeting changed from May 29 
to May 24, to commemorate the evacuation of Wisconsin Territory by 
British troops, May 24, 1815. 

Officers elected May 2g, icjog. 

President, Gardner Perry Stickney Milwaukee 

First Vice-President, Kossuth Kent Kennan Milwaukee 

Second Vice-President, Henry Martyn Ogden Milwaukee 

Secretary, Russell Watson Fish Milwaukee 

Treasurer, William Stark Smith Milwaukee 

Registrar, William Ward Wight Milwaukee 

Historian, Rolland Lewis Porter Mukwonago 

Chaplain, Rt. Rev. Gershom Mott Williams Marquette, Mich. 



WYOMING SOCIETY. 
28 Members. 

Organized March 28, 1908. Admitted into the National Society 
April 30, 1908. 






62 sons oi- the; American revolution 

Officers elected May, igog. 

President, William Edwards Chaplin Cheyenne 

Vice-President, Henry Benjamin Patten Cheyenne 

Secretary, William A. Riner Cheyenne 

Treasurer, Arthur H. Doane .Cheyenne 

Registrar, Floyd Farrington Bur chard Cheyenne 

Historian, William Levi Whipple Cheyenne 

Chaplain, Leander Corning Hills Cheyenne 









PROCEEDINGS 



OF Til 15 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS 
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

HELD AT BALTIMORE AND ANNAPOLIS, MD., 
April 30 and May i, 1909. 



t>3 



COMMITTEES OF THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL 
CONGRESS. 

Special Committee Appointed by the National Executive Committee. 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman, District of Columbia 

Society. 
George R. Gaither, President of the Maryland State Society. 
General Clinton L,. Riggs, Vice-President of the Maryland State Society. 



Committees of the Maryland Society 
Executive com m ittee. 



Henry Stockbridge, Chairman. 
Edward F. Arthurs, Secretary. 



Courtland B. Springer. 
Dan'l Annan. 

committee on invited guests. 



committee on hotels and rail- Geo. W. Hyde, Chairman. 



roads. 

Thos. M. Maynadier, Chairman. 
James S. Norn's. 
Tli os. M. Ward. 
John C. Orem. 

committee on registration and 
information. 

Edward F. Arthurs, Chairman. 
J. Krebs Rusk. 
Walter D. Young. 
Aubrey Pear re, Jr. 
Irvin G. Herman. 

CO M M I XT E E N E X QURS ION. 

Jas. E. Hancock, Chairman. 
Fred'k M. Supplee. 
Elmer C. Perkins. 
Jas. W. Clayton. 

committee on banquet. 

Alfred D. Bernard, Chairman. 
Jas. D. Iglehart, 
A. Cookman L,each. 



Jas. E. Hancock. 
Admiral Yates Stirling. 
Hon. Geo. A. Pearre. 
Alfred D. Bernard. 

COMMITTEE ON BADGES. 

Dr. Jas. D. Iglehart, Chairman. 
Dr. Nicholas L. Dashiell. . 
E. S. Stiles. 

COMMITTEE ON PRESS AND 
PUBLICITY. 

Jra H. Houghton, Chairman. 
Robinson C. Waiters. 
Frank R. Kent. 
Thos. G. Potts. 
Wm. C. Page. 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

Gen. Clinton L. Riggs, Chairman. 
Hon. Edwin Warfield. 
Jas. S. Norris. 
Aubrey Pearre, Jr. 
And chairmen of the various com- 
mittees. 



64 




AT THEBALTIMORE CONGRESS 

I OF THE STATE HOUSE. ANNAPOLIS 




DELEGATES AND GUESTS AT 
PHOTOGRAPH ON THE STEPS OF 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NINETEENTH ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

HELD at Baltimore; and Annapolis, Md., April 30 and May i, 1909. 



Morning Session, Baltimore, April 30, 1909. 

The Congress was called to order by Hon. Henry Stockbridge, Presi- 
dent General, at 10.05 a. m. The invocation was delivered by His 
Eminence, James Cardinal Gibbons. 

Cardinal Gibbons : We pray Thee, Oh God of might, wisdom, and 
justice, through Whom authority is rightly administered, laws are 
enacted and judgment decreed, assist with Thy Holy Spirit of counsel 
and fortitude the President of these United States, that his administra- 
tion may be conducted in righteousness and be eminently useful to Thy 
people over whom he presides, by encouraging due respect for virtue and 
religion, by a faithful execution of the laws in justice and mercy, and 
by restraining vice and immorality. We thank Thee, Oh Lord, that 
our lives have been cast in pleasant places; that we were born and 
reared in a country where we have the privilege of enjoying liberty 
without license and legitimate authority without despotism, and where 
our Government holds over us the right of authority without interfering 
with the sacred and God-given rights of conscience. We thank Thee, 
Oh Lord, for the success which followed the efforts of the Fathers of 
the American Revolution in purchasing for us an independent country, 
and we earnestly pray that their sons assembled here this morning may 
emulate the patriotism oi their fathers and that, by their civic virtues, 
they may contribute to the greater glory of our country, to preserve it 
intact and to develop and consolidate this Republic which has been left 
to them by their illustrious fathers as a most precious heirloom. And 
we earnestly hope that those assembled here will always cultivate the 
arts of peace and good will and fraternity among their brethren through- 
out the land, and that they may be made conscious of that glorious truth 
that peace hath her blessings and victories not less renowned than war. 

(With audience.) Our Father who art in Heaven! 1 fallowed be Thy 
name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in 
Heaven; give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses 
5 65 






66 SONS 01* Tliy AMERICAN LtDVOlyUTlON 

• 
as we forgive those that trespass against us. And lead ns not into 
temptation, but deliver us from evil, for Thine is the kingdom and the 
power and the glory forever. Amen! 

The President General: The next order of business as prescribed 
by the by-laws is the appointment of the Committee on Credentials. 
This is one of the standing committees and to facilitate the work of 
this Congress I will name the following gentlemen as constituting the 
Committee on Credentials that they may begin their work promptly: 
John D. Vandercook, Chairman; Louis Annin Ames, of New York; 
R. Fuller Shryock, of Maryland; George Curtis Darling, of Rhode 
Island; George F. Burgess, of Connecticut; Charles W. Moores, of 
Indiana, and Henry P. Baldwin, of Ohio. That committee will be pre- 
paring their report between now and a little later stage of the proceed- 
ings. As the next order of business I will ask the Congress to rise and 
unite in the strains of the Star Spangled Banner. 

The President Generae: Compatriots, I hardly need say to you how 
glad we of the Maryland Society are to welcome you upon the shores of 
the Chesapeake. Whether we shall be able to fulfill all of the promises 
which President Gaither, of the Maryland Society, made last year I do 
not know. We will do our best; but I take great pleasure in intro- 
ducing to you at this stage of the proceedings the Mayor of the city, 
Hon. J. Barry Mahool, who can extend to you the feelings of this city 
upon having you here from the viewpoint of an eminent citizen, rather 
than a compatriot in our Society, although we mean to have him in some 
time. 

ADDRESS BY MAYOR MAHOOL. 

Mr. Mahooi, : Mr. Stockbridge, His Eminence Cardinal Gibbons, 
ladies and gentlemen, Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution: 
(Applause.) I am indeed glad to be here today as a citizen of. no 
mean city to extend to you the welcome of its citizens upon this occas- 
ion. I am not familiar with the promises that Mr. Gaither made to you 
as to what you might expect when you came to Baltimore, but, knowing 
Mr. Gaither as T do, having him as one of my friends, I know from my 
knowledge of him that he told you that you would find a hospitable 
welcome. I do not know what he said about the weather. I have no 
doubt but he told you at that time you would be sure to meet under 
smiling skies. I cannot vouch for that, although I have every reason to 
hope that you may indeed be regaled by beautiful and delightful weather. 
But whether that is so or not, my friends, the hospitality of the people 
of Baltimore is a hospitality that shines even when the clouds are low- 
ering. (Applause.) Although we cannot promise you that, we hope in 
our hearts and minds that the weather will be good. We can tell you, 
my friends, thai our hearts are right; that we will extend to you the 
right hand of fellowship; that we will give you that warm-hearted 
. hospitality for which the South and the great city of Baltimore has well 
been famed. And now, my friends, as you have assembled in this city, 



PROCEEDINGS UF BALTIMORE CONGRESS 6j 

and as you have joined your voices in that beautiful song - , the Star 
Spangled Banner, it is hardly necessary for me to remind you of the 
fact that that song was given birth in this city; that that song which 
will go down the ages as long as men gather upon the earth, was in- 
spired in 1814 upon the broad waters of the Patapsco River that flows 
;u your feet today. And 1 trust before you go away from this city that 
you will bend your steps toward Fort McHenry, where the Stars and 
Stripes still proudly floats. And therefore, my friends, I feel that in 
this matter, and in other matters relating to the wars that have preceded 
us, that Baltimore and Maryland, the great State of which this city is 
the metropolis, have taken no small, no mean, part in sending to the 
front her sons, and have sent to the front her daughters, and have given 
nf the very best of their citizenship that this country might endure for 
all time. (Applause.) And although many years have passed over the 
heads of most of us since the time when this country became free and 
independent, still, my friends, the spirit of 1776 has shot itself like a 
golden needle through all the Nation's history and as long as time goes 
on, as long as men live, that spirit will lie always ready to barken to her 
country's call, to take up arms in time of war for the purpose of protect- 
ing and safeguarding the liberty of the American people. (Applause.) 
Now, friends, as His Eminence has said, peace hath her victories as 
well as war and the spirit that is in our hearts and minds today can do 
as much for the uplift for the conditions that surround us at the present 
time in every State, in every city, as did the spirit that inspired the sons 
of America who, through snow and ice and heat and cold, took up arms 
to protect the liberty of the people in 1776. There always will be, there 
is now, and there ever have been foes without and foes within that are 
ever attempting to undermine our free American institutions. And 
therefore, my friends, I believe that this spirit of patriotism which has 
and always will be kept alive, like the fires that were kept alive' by the 
vestal virgins upon their sacred .altars, that that spirit will always be 
kept alive upon the altars of American institutions. (Applause.) It is 
not my purpose here today to make any extended speech. I simply have 
come to welcome you on behalf of the people of Baltimore. We have a 
history of which we are proud. The State of Maryland has a history of 
which she may well be proud. She has taken her part in every war that 
has ever taken place in the United States. Her sons and her daughters 
will always be ready to respond to that call and to respond to the call of 
the entire citizenship, whether it be in war or whether it be in any other 
crisis that comes to this great country of ours. And, as Mayor of the 
city, I trust that you may have a most enjoyable time among us; that 
you may go away as thousands of others,— -and I say this with the 
assurance that you will do it, — that you will go away feeling that Balti- 
more City has extended to you a most hospitable and cordial welcome, 
and, as Mayor of the city and on behalf of her citizens, T bid you God- 
speed in the work I hat yon have undertaken, thai you may go forward 
and inspire the hearts of the men, women, and children of our land with 
this patriotic zeal that this country may endure for .all time. (/Applause.) 



68 SONS 01- TliLC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

ANNUM, ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT GENERAL 
STOCKBRIDGE. 

Compatriots : At this time it is the duty of your President General 
to present to you a statement of the condition and needs of the Society. 
To a very large extent this will be covered in the reports which will be 
made by the general officers and from the several committees. To avoid 
needless repetition, therefore, only such matters will now be dealt with 
as have suggested themselves as of the greatest importance. 

The main work of my predecessor, President General McClary, was, 
as you will recall, directed to building up the Society in numerical 
strength, and his term unfortunately closed before the full effect of his 
work manifested itself. The year now closing has enjoyed the fruits of 
his labors, and the number of new members enrolled has been in excess 
of that recorded for many years. Two new State Societies have been 
organized, one in Idaho, the other in New Mexico, largely through the 
efficient work of Dr. Guyer; a charter has been issued for a Society in 
Mississippi, and a large amount of preliminary work done in two other 
of the Southern States. Notwithstanding all of this activity the net 
increase of the Society has been small. Several independent factors 
have cooperated to this result. First, the losses by death have been 
exceptionally large; second, a more thorough revision of the list of 
members has been made by a number of the State Societies than for a 
long time, with the consequent dropping from the roll of an unusually 
large number of men; and third, what I regard as an inherent weakness 
in our plan of organization. 

The depletion of our roll by the dropping of inactive, non-contributing 
members, while showing an apparent diminution of strength, is in 
reality the reverse. An hundred earnest, active members are worth more 
than three times that number of nominal but inactive members, and the 
elimination which has been going on, will, it is believed, result in giving 
us a more active, aggressive body of men for the patriotic work of the 
Society. 

The factor in this matter referred to as an inherent weakness in our 
plan of organization, is the question of local Chapters and the relation 
between them and the State Society. While the subject is not a new 
one, the entire lack of a general system and the ill results which flow 
from such a condition are becoming more and more manifest. Friction 
has been occasioned in two States upon this matter during the past 
year, and while in each instance the difficulty has to a greater or less 
degree been obviated, the cause of it still exists and dissension arising 
therefrom may break forth at any time. At the last Congress this sub- 
ject was briefly considered and referred to a special committee, and that 
Committee has worked zealously during the year, and will make certain 
recommendations to this Congress. The Committee has not as yet been 
able to formulate a plan which it deems feasible to put into universal 
operation on account of the varying practices which have grown up in 
different States and become firmlv rooted. 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS C9 

It will be manifest that the essential requisite for substantial growth 
of our Society lies in making' the Chapter the unit of organization, 
where the members come in frequent personal touch with one another; 
that a member of a State Society residing from one hundred to six 
hundred miles distant from the location of the State Society will have 
but a weak and uncertain interest in the organization, and not un- 
naturally comes to feel that his annual membership dues are entirely for 
the benefit of others, bringing him no adequate return. 

It is undoubtedly true at the present time that our State Societies are 
indisposed to relinquish a method of Chapter relation to State Societies 
with which they are familiar, but it is urgently recommended that a 
definite, uniform plan be prepared to be observed in those States where 
no Chapters have as yet been formed. If this be done and it shall then 
demonstrate in operation that it has the result of increasing materially 
the interest of the individual member, and the growth and strength of 
the States adopting it, as compared with those in which a different 
method is pursued, it will become to the interest of the remaining 
States to accept substantially, if not in its entirety, a method which has 
demonstrated its practical value. 

It is therefore recommended that this Congress authorize the con- 
tinuance of a Committee upon this subject, and that such Committee be 
empowered to formulate a plan with reference thereto, which, when it 
shall have received the approval of the Executive Committee, may be 
made applicable to all States in which as yet no distinct Chapter organi- 
zations have been effected. 

During the past year in pursuance of the action taken at the last 
Congress the Ofi-iciai, Buuxi'in of the Society has been mailed, free, 
to each member of the Society. That this step was a wise one has 
abundantly been shown by the large number of appreciative expressions 
from members who have through this medium been really brought in 
touch for the first time with the work which the Society is endeavoring 
to carry on. It is confidently believed that this policy has been the 
means of preserving to us many members, and attracting some new 
ones. I most strongly urge that this distribution of the Bulletin be 
continued, and that the officers of State Societies and Chapters be en- 
couraged to make full reports through this medium of their activities. 
Such reports can and ought to be made more full and attractive than at 
present. 

Reference has already been made to the ravages of death in our 
Society, and four of these are deserving of special mention. These are 
the deaths of Daniel Coit Gilman, of the Connecticut Society; Rear 
Admiral Charles M. Thomas, of the Navy; James M. Edwards, who 
was one of the very few and rapidly diminishing members of actual 
sons, and, most serious of all, the Reverend Rufus W. Clark, of the 
Michigan Society, a former Chaplain General of the National Society 
and, at the time of his death, the Chairman of the Committee on Edu- 
cation of the National Society. 

The passing away in large numbers of our members leads by a sort 



70 



S')NS Ob" Till-; AMERICAN KlCVOI,UTION 



of sequence to another matter. Even with our present membership of 
nearly 12,000, it will occur to most that there are a large number of 
sons of our present members who are eligible and who arc not enrolled 
upon our membership. These should be with us. No American of 
twenty-one is too young to take a stand for patriotism, or to be known 
as taking such stand. The bringing in of these young men alone would 
make a large addition to our membership. With a view to stimulating 
this, just after the close of the last Congress one of our most zealous 
members offered the insignia of our Society, to be awarded to that State 
Society which should add during the year the largest percentage of 
sons of existing members. That insignia will be awarded at the present 
Congress. It seems opportune in this connection to recommend to each 
State Society that it devote special attention during the ensuing year 
to drawing in those sons of our present membership not as yet borne 
upon our rolls. 

In this connection it is but just that acknowledgment should be made 
of the valuable assistance rendered to this Society, in the matter of 
increasing our membership, by the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution. This has been specially noteworthy in Mississippi and Alabama, 
and an expression of grateful recognition of the service has been sent 
to several ladies in these two States. 

It has also been a most agreeable fact that our relations with kindred 
societies have continued both pleasant and cordial and with none more 
so than the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the indications 
all are of the increase.' in the friendly relations and growing reciprocal 
courtesies and an interchange ^>i good offices between these two Socie- 
ties, 

The work' of the Committee on Education encountered the misfortune 
of the loss of its earnest and efficient chairman, as elsewhere men- 
tioned, lie was succeeded by the senior member of the committee, 
Colonel Lyman, of the District of Columbia Society, who will present 
the report of that committee, fn conjunction with the educational work 
of the Society the Executive Committee caused a number of school 
medals to be struck from the die prepared in 1895, bronze being the 
metal selected. It was thus possible to furnish these to State Societies 
desiring to make use of them at an exceedingly moderate price, and 
the demand [or them has !"ul!>' equalled the expectations of the Com- 
mittee, thus showing in the most satisfactory manner the work which 
is being done by our State Societies in stimulating an interest in our 
country's history among the children of the schools. 

The Committee on Alien Education and Information has not been 
idle. Though at first disappointed in the extent of the demand for the 
first leaflet issued, it has been gratifying to note that the requests for it 
continue to come in steadily. The second leallct, dealing with naturali- 
zation, has been approved by the Executive Committee, followed by the 
approval of the State Department and the Department of Commerce 
and Labor, and its adoption by the latter as a regular publication of 
the Bureau- of Immigration. An edition in English has been printed 



PROCEEDINGS 01* LIAI/HMORE CONGRESS 



n 



and distributed, and the translation of it into foreign languages is now 
in progress. While relations with the Department continue cordial, it 
will result from a recent ruling that the expense of continuing this work 
will be somewhat larger during the coming year than it has been in 
the past. 

The several State Societies have maintained as a rule their accus- 
tomed activities, and these will be shown in the reports from the 
States. The most important of the new monuments dedicated during 
the year was that erected in Fort Green, Brooklyn, to the prison-ship 
martyrs, which was unveiled on November ij, 1908, and in which the 
members of the Empire State Society bore a prominent part. 

Acting under instruction from the Executive Committee to take such 
steps as were practicable to secure greater respect for the national 
anthem, shortly after the adjournment of the last Congress your ['resi- 
dent General opened communication with the American Federation of 
Musicians, and at the annual convention of that body in May a resolu- 
tion was adopted requesting leaders of bands and orchestras connected 
with the Federation to omit the Star Spangled Banner, or strains taken 
from it, from all medleys played by bands and orchestras under their 
direction. The cordiality of the action is deserving of special mention, 
and the action is the more remarkable from the fact that it was passed 
after an adverse report from the committee to which it had been re- 
ferred. In return tin- Federation requests that this Society will use its 
influence to secure the restoration to the anthem as printed of the 
generally omitted third verse. 

Early in the year the attention of the Executive Committee was di- 
rected to the fact that the Society possessed but meager information 
as to the work which had been performed by the several State Societies, 
so that it was an impossibility to give anything approaching accurate 
information as to what had been accomplished in the various States by 
the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in those States, 
or even a just estimate of what bad been accomplished by the Society 
as a whole. A series of questions, designed to elicit full information 
from each State Society, was prepared by former President General 
McClary and approved by the Executive Committee. These were sent 
to each State Society in the fall and the replies which were received 
were referred to the Historian General for compilation and arrange- 
ment, and something of what they contained will doubtless be heard in 
the report which he will .present. 

In that connection I desire 1o call attention to the fact that the duties 
of I he Historian General, as prescribed in the By-Laws, are general in 
terms and vague in character, with the inevitable result that the. reports 
of that officer have been most diverse. L would therefore recommend 
the adoption of a resolution to the effect that the Historian of each 
Slate Society be directed annually, not later than the first day of March, 
to forward to the Historian General a succinct but complete statement 
of the activities and accomplishments of such Slate Society during the 
preceding twelve months, in order that so much of the same as shall 



72 SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

be of general interest and deserving: of preservation may be reported 
by the Historian General to thc f Congress of that year. 

In closing this meager summary of the year, I desire to plaee on 
reeord the very efficient work of the various members of the Executive 
Committee. The gentlemen composing that committee have at personal 
sacrifice been diligent, not merely in attendance upon the meetings of 
the Committee, but in giving their time and strength to serve this 
Society, and whatever of the work of the year commends itself to you 
as good, the credit belongs to them. 

It was with many misgivings that one year ago I undertook the 
responsibilities attaching to the position with which you honored me, 
and I am today more deeply impressed with my own shortcomings than 
any member of this Congress can be; but I wish at this time to make 
public acknowledgment of the prompt, uniform, and effective aid and 
encouragement which has at all times been accorded me by each of the 
several committees and by a large number of the individual members 
of the Society. 

Vice-President General Bates : In connection with the report of 
the President General, I desire to submit a resolution on the occasion 
of the death of Dr. Clark, and with your permission I will read it. 



Tribute to the Memory oe Rev. Rums W. Clark, D. D. 

Rufus Wheelwright Clark, M. A., D. D., departed this life on the 
tenth day of January, 1909, at Columbus, Ohio. He was born at Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, May 28, 1844. In 1865 he graduated from 
Williams College, and from the General Theological Seminary in New 
York in 1868. His first charge was at St. John's Church, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. In 1871 he became rector of Trinity Church of 
Columbus, Ohio, and in 1877 he came to Detroit, and from that date 
until 1905, for a period of twenty-eight years, he was in charge of the 
pastorate of St. Paul's Church of that city. 

Doctor Clark stands as a representative of a noble and upright life. 
He spent thirty-six years of service in the ministry; had been recently 
Secretary of the Board of Missions of the Episcopal Church of New 
York, with his field of labor lying between Pittsburg on the cast and 
Denver on the west. His services as a public-spirited citizen were 
equally marked. He was a member of the Michigan Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution since November 17, 1803. His Revo- 
lutionary ancestor was Abraham Wheelwright, whose services in the 
Revolution were recorded in a manuscript account in his own hand- 
writing, long possessed by Doctor Clark. He was President of the 
Michigan Society and identified with all its varied activities. The 
historical section was his own creation. He was a commanding figure 
in the Congress of the National Society. He was Chaplain General for 
four years, and Chairman of the Committee on Education since 1906. 

Such activity in the welfare of the National Society cannot be too 
highly estimated. His death is a loss to the cause of patriotism, and 
is deeply mourned by this Congress, lie will be missed in its councils. 
The sweetness of his disposition, his kind and gentle character, and 
mild but persuasive manner will be a delightful remembrance, and his 
influence was indeed a benediction. 

This tribute is made as expressive of the high appreciation held by 
this Congress of the life, character, and services rendered by our late 



PROCEEDINGS 01? BALTIMORE; CONGRESS 73 

compatriot to the cause of patriotic advancement and for the welfare of 
the National Society. 

It is resolved, That the National Society extend to the family of our 
deceased friend and associate our deep sympathy in their great loss. 

// is further resolved, That this testimonial be placed on the records 
of the Society, and that a copy of the same be forwarded by the Secre- 
tary General to the family of our late compatriot. 

I move that the resolution be adopted. 
Seconded and carried. 

The President General: The next order of business is the report 
of the Credentials Committee, and I will ask Mr. Vandercook, the 
chairman of that committee, to present such report. 

Moved (by Mr. Dewey) that the full reading of the report of the 
Credentials Committee be dispensed with, and that the chairman of the 
Committee give only the total list of the delegates from each State, the 
total report to be printed in the proceedings of the Congress. 

Motion amended (by Mr. M00RU), that the report go into detail only 
by giving the number from each State Society. 

Amendment accepted by Mr. Dewey, seconded and carried. 

Report read at this point by Mr. Vandercook, as above suggested. 

The President General: Without objection the report is to be re- 
ceived and the committee continued. The Chair hears no objection and 
the report is accepted. 

The final report of the Credentials Committee showed that 201 quali- 
fied members of the Congress were in attendance, including 10 general 
officers, 4 ex-Presidents General, and 187 delegates from 24 State Socie- 
ties — the largest Congress in the history of the Society — as follows : 

MEMBERS OF TWENTIETH ANNUAL CONGRESS. 

General Officers. 

President General, Hon. Henry Stockbridge, 75 Gunther Building, 
Baltimore, Md. ; Vice-Presidents General, George Williams Bates, 32 
Buhl Building, Detroit, Mich., John R. Webster, Omaha, Neb., Dr. 
Clarkson N. Guyer, 301 Jackson Building, Denver, Colo., George Row- 
land Howe, Park and Mulberry Sts., Newark, N. J.; Secretary and 
Registrar General, A. Howard Clark, Washington, D. C. ; Assistant 
Secretary General (during Baltimore Congress), Chester M. Clark, 
Washington, D. C. ; Treasurer General, Willard Secor, Forest City, 
Iowa; Historian General, Walter Kendall Watkins, 1110 Tremont 
Building, Boston, M!ass. ; Chaplain General, Rev. Frank Oliver Hall, 
4 West 76th St.-, New York, N. Y. ; ex-Presidents General, Hon. Edwin 
Warficld, Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md., Gen. Edwin S. Greeley, 
New Plaven, Conn., Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, Peckskill, N. Y., Nel- 
son A. McClary, 184 Ea Salle St., Chicago, 111. 



74 



vSONS 1)1- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



California. 

Pelham W. Ames, Trustee, care Alden Ames, 44 Brattle St., Boston, 
Mass.; J. H. S. Bartholomew, Occidental, Sonoma County, Cal. ; 
William M. Bunker, Chamber of Commerce, San Francisco; Seabury 
C. Mastick, 2 Rector St., New York, N. Y. 

Colorado. 

Dr. Fred N. Guyer, 179 Clinton Ave., Albany, N. Y. ; Wardner Wil- 
liams, 1600 Steele St., Denver, Colo. 



Connecticut. 

Lewis B. Curtis, Trustee and President, Bridgeport ; Rufus K.Holmes, 
Winsted; Morris B. Beardsley, Bridgeport; Charles G. Stone, Hart- 
ford; Wilson II. Lee, New Haven; Seymour C. Loomis, New Haven; 
Henry C. Sherwood, Bridgeport; George W. Jackman, Bridgeport; 
Samuel A. Burns, Bridgeport; Dr. George G. F. Williams, Hartford; 
Clarence II. Wickham, Hartford; J. Coolidge Hills, Hartford; Leverett 
Belknap, Hartford; Merritt Heminway, Watertown; William E. Chand- 
ler, The Hargrave, 7-2*1 St. West, New York, N. Y. ; Fred A. Dooliltle, 
New Haven; George F. Burgess, New Haven; Gen. George H. Ford, 
New Haven; Tracy B. Warren, Bridgeport; George Farlee, 11 Wall 
St., New York, N. Y. ; Charles E. Burton, New Haven; Harry H. 
Heminway, Watertown; Orlando Ii. Brothwell, Bridgeport; W. T. 
Woodruff, Thomaston ; Bernard C. Steiner, 1038 N. Eutaw St., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Delaware. 

John Bancroft, Trustee, Rockford, Park Drive, Wilmington ; William 
Beadenkoff, 1400 Pennsylvania Ave., Wilmington. 

District or' Columbia. 

Hon. Edward B. .Moore, President, 2332 Columbia Road, Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; William L. Marsh, U. S. Pension Office; John E. Fenwick, 
1729 New York Ave.; Philip F. Earner, 918 F St.; William A. De 
Caindry, 914 17th St.; William II. Pearce, 1737 S St.; Commander 
J. H. Moore, U. S. N., 1755 P St.; C. C. Magruder, Jr., 1018 14th St.; 
Albert J. Gore, 1746 P St.; Dr. Ira W. Dennison, 1312 L St.; Col. 
Charles Lyman, Treasury Department; Henry W. Samson, 2423 Penn- 
sylvania Ave.; Paul Brockett, Smithsonian Institution; Dr. Williams 
Donnally, roi8 14th St. 

Illinois. 

Horace E. Horton, Trustee, 10206 Longwood Ave., Chicago; James 
H. Gilbert, 108 La Salle St., Chicago; Samuel F. Bliss, 2626 Lake Ave., 
Chicago; Charles Kingsbury Miller, 544 N. State St., Chicago; Francis 
J. dishing, 1016 Chamber of Commerce, Chicago; Hiram L. Holden, 
Easton, Md.; John D. Vandercook, 108 La Salle St.. Chicago. 






.; 



L'ROClClCmNGS ()!■ I'.AI.TJ MOKK CONCRlCSS 



75 



Iowa. 

Elmer M. Wentworth, State Center; Morris W. Blair, Mediapolis ; 
Capt. F. II. Lincoln, U. S. A., Fort Howard, Baltimore, Aid.; George A. 
Blake, Charles City. 

Louisiana. 
Prof. Ernest Lagarde, Emmitsburg, Md. 



Maine. 

Hon. Waldo Pcttengill, Trustee, Rumford Falls; Hon. Oliver C. Hall,, 
President, Augusta; Hon. Edward A. Butler, Rockland; Philip F. Tur- 
ner, Portland; A. R. Stubbs, Portland; Roswell F. Doten, Portland; 
W. K. Sanderson, Portland; Oliver L. Hall, Bangor; W. W. Crosby, 
2850 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

Maryland. 

George R. Gaither, President, in N. Charles St., Baltimore; Rear- 
Admiral Yates Stirling, 209 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore; George W. 
Hyde, 225 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore; George W. McCreary, 1826 W. 
Lafayette Ave., Baltimore; W. P. C. Cockey, New City Hotel, Fred- 
erick; Prof. A. B. Bibbins, 2600 Maryland Ave., Baltimore; Gen. Clin- 
ton L. Riggs, 903 N. Charles St., Baltimore ; James E. Hancock, 4 S. 
Howard St., Baltimore; Dr. James D. Iglehart, 211 W. Lanvale St., 
Baltimore. 

Massachusetts. 

Edward C. Battis, Trustee and President, 81 Washington St., Salem; 
Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, Lowell; F. Julien Silsby, 50 Congress St., 
Boston; Jonathan E. llayward, Quincy Ave., East Braintree; Dr. 
Waldo E. Boardman, 419 Boylston St., Boston; Henry P. Kittredge, 
Quincy; Henry P. Oakman, 1 Oakman St., Neponset; Jerome C. Hosnier 
166 Devonshire St., Boston; Charles A. Harvey, 104 Kingston St., 
Boston; David Floyd, Winthrop; Nathaniel F. Hunt, Braintree; Maj. 
Horace P. Williams, P. O. Box 3613, Boston; William C. Briggs, 67 
Milk St., Boston; Dr. Francis 11. Brown, 28 State St., Boston; Herbert 
W. Kimball, 17 Milk St., Boston; Albert II. Stearns, 59 Beaumont St., 
Dorchester; Webster Bruce, 80 Baker St., Lynn; Albert F. Amec, P. O. 
Box H, Cambridge; Frank Rmnrill, 580 Warren St., Roxbury; David 
Pingree, South Hamilton; John G. Moseley, 230 State St., Boston. 

Michigan. 

Albert M. Henry, 1201 Penobscot Building, Detroit; Theodore H. 
Eaton, 28 Woodward Ave., Detroit ; Jacob S. Farrand, Jr., care Far- 
rand, Williams & Clark, Detroit; Elliot T. Sloeum, 514 Hammond 
Building, Detroit; William M, Finck, 145 Van Dycke Ave., Detroit; 
George I'.. Remick, 102.3 Penobscot Building, Detroit; Williams C. 



j6 SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Harris, 610 Wayne County Savings Bank Building, Detroit; William 

A. Butler, Jr., Butler Building, Detroit; Edward T. Pettengill, 678 
Baker St., Detroit; Andrew C. Wood, 315 Grand Boulevard West, 
Detroit. 

Missouri. 

Col. John L. Robards, Hannibal. 

Nebraska. 
Ralph W. Breckenridge, President, N. Y. Life Building, Omaha. 

New Hampshire. 

Hon. Henry M. Baker, President, 141 1 F St., Washington, D. C. 
(Bow Mills, N. H.) ; William F. Whitcher, Woodsville, N. IT. 

New Jersey. 

Hon. Edward S. Atwater, 78 Broad St., Elizabeth; Capt. John H. 
Palmer, 179 Arlington Ave., East Orange; John Lenord Merrill, 517 
Park Ave., East Orange; Charles S. Kiggins, 96 W. Grand St., Eliza- 
beth; Col. J. R. Mullikin, 312 Belleville Ave., Newark; George T. 
Parrott, 1107 Mary St., Elizabeth; David L. Pierson, 17 Washington 
St., East Orange; Thomas W. Williams, 78 N. Arlington Ave., East 
Orange; Frederick H. Clarke, 24 Webster Place, East Orange; Joseph 
Holmes, "Cream Ridge," R. F. D., Monmouth County. 

Empire State. 

John H. Burroughs, 15 William St., New York; Wra. A. Marble, 
Trustee, 395 Broadway, New York; B. C. Stilwell, 153 W. 83d St., 
New York; Hon. Warren Higley, 165 Broadway, New York; Dr. G. C. 
Batcheller, 130 Fifth Ave., New York; Francis L. Wandell, 51 Cham- 
bers St., New York; N. T. Hawkins, 514 E. 87th St., New York; Rev. 
J. E. Iiartsock, 233 W. 48th St., New York; Wra. S. Kitchell, 145 
Reade St., New York; Geo. IT. Denny, 34 Park Place, New York; 
John W. Denny, 105 Third Ave., Newark, N. J.; James R. Ross, 1297 
Fulton St., Brooklyn; Chas. H. Wight, 85 Cedar St., New York; Col. 
Edgar S. Dudley, U. S. A., West Point; David A. Morrison, Newburgh; 
Eldred Johnson, Jersey City, N. J.; Trueman G. Avery, Buffalo; Frank 

B. Steele, 414 White Building, Buffalo; Tennis D. Huntting, 220 
Broadway, New York; G. L. Walker, 400 Riverside Drive, New York; 
G. O. B. Weaver, 375 Cumberland St., Brooklyn; Admiral E. S. Prime, 
Huntington; Abner Ketcham, Room 35, Union Station, Albany; Hon. 
Wm. C. Buck, Waverly; Dr. J. Hubley Schall, 115 St. Marks Ave., 
Brooklyn ; Jesse Peterson, 66 Walnut St., Lockport ; J. Scott Baldwin, 
Elmira; P. Valentine Sherwood, 160 E. 61 st St., New York; Harry C. 
Palmer, 94 St. James Place, Buffalo; Lansing H. Van Doren, 2518 Oak 
St., Baltimore, Md. 



PROCEEDINGS OF BAl/flMORJS CONGRESS J J 

Ohio. 

Col. William A. Taylor, Columbus; Col. Isaac F. Mack, Sandusky; 
W. G. Wilson, Toledo; James M. Richardson, Cleveland; Moulton 
Houk, Toledo; D. S. Miller, Upper Sandusky. 

Oregon. 

Coe A. McKenna, 605 Commercial Building, Portland; Edward D. 
Baldwin, The Dalles. 

Pennsylvania. 

Col. R. W. Guthrie, Trustee, 434 Diamond St., Pittsburgh; Maj. 
Moses Veale, jzj Walnut St., Philadelphia; Thomas Stephen Brown, 
HOI Berger Building, Pittsburgh; Charles Wilcox, 363 Frick Building, 
Pittsburgh; Rev. E. D. Warheld, Easton ; Dr. W. E. Jackson, New 
Castle; Rev. E. E. Higley, New Castle; F. A. Kimball, City Hall, Pitts- 
burgh; Col. A. J. Logan, 2839 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh; Herman W. 
Fernberger, 1808 N. Broad St., Philadelphia; Clarence P. Wynne, 721 
Walnut St., Philadelphia; Edward King, New Castle; Dr. Charles W. 
Karsner, 1320 S. Broad St., Philadelphia; Scott D. Long, New Castle; 
also Omar S. Decker, 715 Amberson St., Pittsburgh, and Peter D. 
Helms, Pottsville, alternates. 

Rhode Island. 

Arthur Preston Sumner, 29 Weybosset St., Providence; Charles Dean 
Kimball, 398 Broadway, Providence; Orrin Luther Bosworth, Bristol; 
Christopher Rhodes, 290 Benefit St., Providence. 

Utah. 

Hon. Hoyt Sherman, Jr., 405 Colorado Building, Washington, D. C 

Vermont. 
William T. Dewey, Montpelier. 

Virginia. 

Gen. Charles J. Anderson, Trustee, Richmond ; Capt. Frank E.Rogers, 
Berkeley P. O. ; Harry H. Trice, Norfolk; J. Staunton Moore, Rich- 
mond. 

Washington. 

Joseph Shippen, 627 New York Building, Seattle; J. Kennedy Stout,. 
Bureau of Corporations, Washington, D. C. 

The President General: The next order of business is reading of the 
minutes of the last Congress. 

Mr. Lyman : I move that the further reading of the minutes be dis- 
pensed with, as they are printed, and it has been read by most of the 
members, and I move that the minutes be approved as read. 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: The next order of business is the reading 
of the report of the Board of Trustees during the past year. 



78 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

The Secretary General: During the past year the Board of Trustees 
has held two meetings, one on May 1, 1908, the proceedings of which 
appear in the 1908 Year Book and in the Official Bulletin of May, 
1908, and one meeting April 30, 1909, which will be recorded in the 1909 
Year Book and in the May Bulletin. The Executive Committee met 
on May 2 and September 26, 1908, and on February 25, 1909, and the 
proceedings have been published. There was also a meeting on April 
29, 1909, which will be recorded in the 1909 Year Book and in the 
Official Bulletin for May. The detailed action will be read if 
desired. 

Moved that the reading of the detailed proceedings of the Board of 
Trustees be dispensed with. 

Seconded and carried. 

Moved (by Mr. Dewey, of Vermont ) that the report of the Board of 
Trustees be received and duly placed on file. 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: The next business in order is the reports of 
the general officers; we will first have the report of Treasurer General 
Secor. 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER GENERAL. 

Office of Treasurer General, 

Forest City, Iowa, April 24, 1909. 
Mr. President General and Compatriots of the Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution : The Treasurer General has the honor to sub- 
mit the following report of the receipts and disbursements for the 
fiscal year ending April 24, 1909. 
Respectfully submitted. 

WlLLARD SECOR, 

Treasurer General. 

April 24. 1908, balance on hand $8,307.23 

Receipts. 
Annual dues : 

1003 $8.00 

1907 23.00 

1008 310.00 

1909 . . 4-955-50 

$5,304.50 

Certificates 597-00 

Application and supplemental blanks 89.75 

Official Bulletin, Iowa 5.00 

J. E. Caldwell & Co., rebate on insignia 134-50 

Annin & Co., rebate on buttons, &c M°-7 2 

Medals 56. 00 

Interest 122. 33 

6,449.80 

Total receipts for the year $14,757.03 



PROCEEDINGS 01- BALTIMORE CONGRESS J() 

Disbursements. 

Appropriation for 1908 Congress $500.00 

Salary of Secretary and Registrar General 1,200.00 

Printing, 1908 Year Book 1,097.70 

Dr. C. N. Guycr, organization expenses 521.40 

Reporting Buffalo Congress, 1908. 80.00 

Maj. Win. Frye Tebbetts, Organization Committee.. 83.00 

Treasurer General, Fidelity bond 35-00 

Thos. M. Vincent, appropriation for Flag Committee 50.00 

American Bank Note Co., diplomas 147.00 

Medals and cases 177,20 

Andrew B. Graham, 100 Spanish War diplomas.... 15.00 

R. \V r . Clark, Educational Committee 39. 10 

Appropriation for Baltimore Congress, T909 500.00 

Printing, stationery and office expenses of Sec'ty*. . 3,282.69 

Emigration pamphlets 138.52 

$7,866.61 

Cash on hand April 24, 1909 6,800.42 

$14,757-03 
Wizard Secor, 

Treasurer Gene nil. 
Forest City, Iowa, April 24, 1909. 

The above balance of $6,890.42 is on deposit as follows: 

Forest City National Bank $2,218.57 

Winnebago County State Bank 788. 50 

First National Bank, Mason City 725.00 

First National Bank-, Corwith. 1,000.00 

Cedar Rapids National Bank 826.72 

The Secor Company 1,331.63 

Total $6,800.42 

Examined and found correct. 

Wm, A. De Caindry, 
Ira H. Houghton, 

Auditing Committee. 
April 30, 1909. 

* Includes OiT ici.m, Buw.ETlN, engrossing certificates, postage, ex- 
prcssage, etc. 



So SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Details of Receipts for Fiscal Year Ending April 24, 1909. 



States. 


Annual dues. 


<D 



H3 

01 

u 


Applications 

and 

Sup'mental 

Blanks. 


Total. 


1903. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Alabama 










$28.00 
1. 00 


$3.00 


$31,00 
24.00 
i3-5o 

207.00 

524.00 
20.15 


Arizona 








$23.00 

13.50 

197.00 

474.00 


Arkansas 








California 








10.00 
50.00 

12 OO 
2.00 


""h'.'i's 

5 -40 


Connecticut 








Colorado 








Dist. Columbia 








267.00 


274.40 


Delaware 








Empire State, . . . 








6,10.00 
14-50 


I32.00 


i9- 6 5 


79I-65 
14.50 
9.00 
3 I 5-4o 
112.30 
148.00 


Florida 








Hawaii 








... 

9.OO 
45.00 
II.OO 
20.00 

I. OO 

4 00 
3 . 00 
9.00 


5 -40 

10.80 

5-50 



3.60 


Illinois 








265. CO 

80.50 

122.50 


Indiana 








Iowa 








Kansas 




$25.00 




26,00 


Kentucky 






35- 00 

41.50 

i93-5o 


39.00 
44.50 


Louisiana 








Maine 








206.10 


Montana 

Maryland 


$8.00 






8.00 






109.50 

725.00 
189.00 


45.00 

20.00 

57.00 

3.00 

1 .00 

14.00 

3 • 00 

1 9 . 00 


I T . 2C) 
3.60 


154.50 


Massachusetts. . 








756.20 
438.10 


Michigan 






$188.50 


Minnesota 






3.00 


Missouri 






26.00 


52.00 

56.50 
I55.00 

197-5*' 

216.50 

15.00 

42.50 

150.50 


79.00 


Nebraska. 






7o, 50 
158.00 


New Hampshire, 








New Jersey 








216. 50 


Ohio 








216. 50 


Oklahoma 








3 • 00 
15.00 


6.25 


18.00 


Oregon 








48.75 


Pennsylvania . . . 








306 . 50 


Rhode Island. . . 








l6 5.50 


South Dakota. . . 










Texas . . 








34.00 
25 . 00 

1 27 . 50 
39-5o 

100.00 
88.00 
1 4 . 00 

$4,955-50 


5.0c 




39.00 
2 5 . 00 


Utah 








Vermont 








18.00 
r .00 
1. 00 


3.60 
3.60 


149.10 


Virginia 








40.50 


Washington .... 








101 .00 


Wisconsin 






90 . 00 
11.50 


i8r.6o 


Wyoming. 






25.50 














$8.00 


$25.00 


$316.00 


1597. oc 


$$9 • 75 


$5,991-25 


Official Bulletin 








5.00 


J. E. Caldwell & 
Annin & Co. reb 


Co. re 
ate. . 


bate . 






134-5° 








140.72 


Medals sold 








56.00 


Interest ... 


122.33 


Total , 


$6,449 80 








. 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BAI,TlMOR]< CONGRESS 8r 

Details or 1 Disbursements of the Treasurer General of the 
National Society. S. A. R., for the Fiscal Year 
Ending April 24, 1909. 
1908. 
April 27. Walter Aspinwall, Treasurer Buffalo Chapter (App'n 

1908 Congress) $500.00 

R. VV. Clark, Chairman Educational Committee, 

postage and stenographer 14.40 

30. A. Howard Clark, salary for April 100.00 

Chester M. Clark, clerical assistance to Secretary... . 38.00 

May 29. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing 41-77 

A. Howard Clark, expenses attending Nat'l Congress 58.50 

Win. Frye Tebbetts, Chairman Organization Com... 51.00 

S. C. Brown, engrossing 80 certs, and clerical work. . 71.85 

Tiffany & Co., silver medal 6.00 

The International Press, composition and plates, 

foreign plates 56.34 

June 9. John G. Hodges, binding 3 vol. records Calif. Soc... 9.00 

Elizabeth D. Tabler, copying 610 appns. Calif. Soc... 100.00 

Annin & Co., rain cover for Traveling Banner 1.50 

S. C. Brown, engrossing 93 certificates ($27.90), 

clerical work and postage 58.00 

The International Press, Committee on Aliens 15.28 

Geo. A. Blake, report!. ^ -Buffalo Congress 80.00 

A. Howard Clark, salary for May, 1908 100.00 

Judd & Detweiler, printing 217.60 

20. Wm. Frye Tebbetts, Chairman Organization Commit- 
tee, South 32 . 00 

22. Annin & Co., rosettes 3.72 

29. Willar.d Secor, Prem. Treasurer General Bond 35-00 

John U. Perkins, abstracts records actual sons 15-00 

W. Drennan, photo of banquet 1 .00 

July 1. A. Howard Clark, salary for June 100.00 

15. American-Slavonic Gazette, composition and electros 

for leaflet 15.00 

24. Judd & Detweiler, printing and addressing Bulletins 387.94 

The Elliott Co., addressing machine equipment 266.42 

Aug. 3. The International Press, Committee on Aliens 32.80 

4. A. Howard Clark, salary for July 100.00 

Sept. 2. Judd & Detweiler, printing 110.25 

5. Chester M. Clark, assistance to Secretary 35-0° 

R. W. Clark, Educational Committee expenses 24.70 

10. A. Howard Clark, salary for August 100.00 

Oct. 5. A. Howard Clark, salary for Sept. and Ex. Com.... 109.00 

Dr. C. N. Guyer, organization expenses 102.40 

16. The Maurice Joyce Eng. Co., 2 cuts for Year Book. . 15.50 
S. C. Brown, engrossing, $27.60; clerical work, $45.45 ; 

postage and expense, $ro.oo 83.05 

E. Morrison Paper Co., one 1000 page record book.. 4.50 

The Elliott Co., mailing labels (OFFICIAL BULLETIN). 23.24 

23. John U. Perkins, work on Year Book and Official 

B ULLETIN 32 . 26 

The Elliott Co., stencils for addressing machine 7.14 

Nov. 3. John U. Perkins, work on Year Book 5- 00 

9. Judd & Detweiler, mailing and addressing October 

Bulletin, etc 298. 13 

A. Howard Clark, salary for October 100.00 

20. S. C. Brown, engrossing and clerical work 45-20 

Judd & Detweiler, 1908 Year Book 1,097.70 

6 



82 



SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Dec. 7. A. Howard Clark, salary for November $100.00 

16. Judd & Detweiler, printing, etc 8.53 

1909. 
Jan. 4. John IT. Moore, postage, express, etc., naturaliza- 
tion leaflets 19. 10 

A. Howard Clark, salary for December 100.00 

John U. Perkins, abstracts, new members 18.39 

Judd & Detweiler, 12,000 Official Bulletins for 

December 263 . 05 

12. S. C. Brown, engrossing, clerical work, postage, etc.. . 70.55 
Thos. M. Vincent, appropriation Flag Committee.... 50.00 

Judd & Detweiler, printing, etc 116.25 

Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, Organization Com. expenses 175.50 

American Bank Note Co., diplomas 147.00 

Feb. 3. A. Howard Clark, salary for January 100.00 

Snpt Mint Philadelphia, 50 medals 25.00 

9. vS. C. Brown, engrossing certs, and clerical work.... 55-30 

13. Judd & Detweiler, supplies 25.02 

20. Berry & Whitmore Co., 101 leather cases for medals. 121.20 

Supt. Mint Philadelphia, 50 additional medals 25.00 

25. Andrew B. Graham Co., 100 Spanish War diplomas. 15.00 

Mar. 6. Judd & Detweiler, printing 9.50 

Annin & Co., 24 rosettes 3.75 

A. Howard Clark, salary for February 100.00 

A. Howard Clark, expense Ex. Com. at New York.. 23.60 

13. John LI. Perkins, clerical work 16.75 

22. S. C. Brown, engrossing, etc 71. 85 

April 3. A. Howard Clark, salary for March 100.00 

Henry Stockbridge, Appn. for Baltimore Congress... 500.00 

14. Judd & Detweiler, OFFICIAL BULLETINS for Mar., etc. 609.08 
S. C. Brown, engrossing and clerical work 52.50 

23. Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, organization expenses 2-J3.50 

Total $7,8^6.61 

Moved that: the report of the Treasurer General be received and 
placed on file. 

Seconded and carried. 

Mr. Marble (N. Y.) : On behalf of the Entertainment Committee 
and to assist them in the work which they are performing, I move you, 
Mr. Chairman, that when this Congress adjourns for recess that it be 
at 12 145 o'clock, and that we gather at 2 o'clock p. m. As I understand 
it, the luncheon is to be served on this floor. 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: In connection with this motion I desire to 
announce that a luncheon will be served for all delegates and alternates 
in this room shortly after one o'clock, to which you are expected to 
come. The ladies who accompany the delegates and visitors to this 
Congress, if they do not .already understand it, are invited to an in- 
formal luncheon at what is known as Colonial Hall, the home of the 
Colonial Dames of America, at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon, where Mrs. 
Stockbridge will be exceedingly happy to meet all the ladies, and she 
hopes that they will all be there. Colonial Hall, in response to a 
request for information, is No. 417 North Charles Street, Charles Street 
being the street which runs by the side of this hotel. It is some six 



PROCEEDINGS 01? BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



83 



or eight blocks down this street and nearly opposite the residence of 
His Eminence Cardinal Gibbons. 
The next order of business is the report of the Secretary General. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL. 

CoMPATKru'rs : During the past year the energies and resources of the 
National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in its patri- 
otic work have been directed strongly toward the education of the 
millions of alien immigrants Hocking to our shores, and the aliens 
already living in this country, in the principles of the American gov- 
ernment and American institutions, and the means by which the benefits 
of these may be secured. To further this end the Society has dis- 
tributed, through its Committee on Information for Aliens, hundreds 
of thousands of leaflets, in thirteen different languages. These leaflets 
are of two forms, the first, leaflet No. 1, entitled "Information for 
Immigrants concerning the United States — its opportunities, govern- 
ment, and institutions," was adopted last year by the United States 
Department of Commerce and Eabor and distributed as an official publi- 
cation, and since the last Congress another leaflet, No. 2, on "Naturali- 
zation," has been adopted and distributed. 

In order to increase the strength and efficiency of the Society in 
carrying on this and its other patriotic work, efforts have not lessened 
in organization and recruiting, with the result: that 1,049 new members 
have been added to the rolls and two new State Societies, New Mexico 
and Idaho, have been admitted to the organization, on December 26, 
1908, and April 8, 1909. In addition, the required number of application 
papers have been filed to form a new Society in Mississippi, and formal 
organization and delivery of a charter will occur as soon as arrange- 
ments can be made. The Organization Committee has also been active 
in Georgia, South Carolina, North Dakota, and elsewhere, as will be 
reported upon by the Organization Committee. 

The National Year Book for 1908 was published in an edition of 750 
copies, the edition being reduced from 1,500 copies at the recommen- 
dation of the Buffalo Congress, and copies were mailed direct to gen- 
eral officers, trustees, national committees, oflicers of State Societies, 
and delegates attending (he Buffalo Congress, instead of the distribution 
in bulk to State Societies, as in previous years. 

In accordance with the vote of the Buffalo Congress and the Board 
of Trustees, the Official Bulletin of the National Society has now been 
established as a quarterly publication, and is distributed to all members 
at the expense of the National Society, being entered at the post office 
at Washington as matter of the "second class," on which the postage 
is 1 cent a pound. During the year the Bulletin was issued in May, 
October, December, and March, and contained ;i total of 138 pages. 
There were included in the Bulletin official notices, records of action by 
the general officers, the Hoard of Trustees, the Executive and other 
national committees, lists of members deceased and of new members, 
and important doings of State Societies. There was appropriated for 



84 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

the Bulletin $r,8oo; the actual cost during the year was $1,767.61, which 
includes $336.54 for permanent mailing equipment and $1,431.07 for 
printing and distribution. By condensation of records of new members, 
full pedigrees of which appear in the Year Book, it was found possible 
to publish considerably more matter than during the previous year in 
an edition of the same number of pages. 

About ten thousand application for membership blanks have been 
printed during the year for the use of State Societies. In accordance 
with a vote of the Executive Committee, at its meeting on February 2$, 
there has been provided, on page 2 of these forms, space for the dates 
of birth, marriage, and death of each ancestor, and on page 3 there is 
inserted the following regulation: 

"Membership is based upon one original claim; when the applicant 
derives eligibility by descent from more than one ancestor, and it is 
desired to take advantage thereof, separate applications, to be marked 
'Supplemental Application,' should be made in each case and filed with 
the original." 

The State Societies have been, as a whole, unusually active during 
the past year in carrying forward the patriotic aims of the organiza- 
tion. Besides the erection of monuments in memory of men and events 
of the American Revolution, the placing of tablets on historic sites, and 
markers on the graves of Revolutionary soldiers, the State Societies 
arc actively at work in encouraging patriotism in the youth of today by 
awarding prizes and medals for essays on patriotic subjects, and on the 
principles of the American government and institutions. Details of 
these activities have been published in the Official Bulletin and will 
appear in the reports of State Societies. 

The annual observance of June 14 as Flag Day has now become 
general throughout the country. This patriotic anniversary was first 
publicly observed in 1890, when the Connecticut Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution adopted resolutions calling the attention 
of the country to the propriety of honoring the "Stars and Stripes." 

There was issued to the State Societies, soon after the Buffalo Con- 
gress, a standard blank form to meet the requirements of Art. IV, 
section 4 of the Constitution, calling for details as to changes in 
membership, the statistical year being made to begin on April 1. 

There were also issued standard books of coupons for use in making 
payments to the National Society, one coupon being sent to the Treasu- 
rer General and one to the Secretary General. 

In 1894 there was established by the National Society a medal, which 
was awarded annually in silver to students in a selected list of colleges 
for the best essays on the principles of the American Revolution, anil 
a gold copy of the medal was awarded for the best one of the silver- 
medal essays. After a few years the award of these medals was dis- 
continued. At the Buffalo Congress attention was called to the advan- 
tage of issuing this medal in bronze for the general use of State Socie- 
ties as an incentive to the study of American history in public schools. 
One hundred replicas in bronze were accordingly struck, and a number 
of them have been sold to the Ohio and other State Societies. The 



PROCEEDINGS Off BAI/flMORE CONGRESS 85 

Chairman of the Committee on Education will formally report to the 
Congress on this subject. 

By direction of the Executive Committee, there was sent to each 
vState Society on October 28 a blank form, prepared by the President 
General, calling for information concerning the patriotic work accom- 
plished by each State Society or Chapter since its organization. The 
data will be used in preparing a general statement on what the Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution has done since 1889. 
The blanks requested information under the following heads : 
1. Monuments, Tablets, Statues, and Busts Erected; 2. Other Memo- 
rials Erected or Established; 3. Number Revolutionary Soldiers' Graves 
Permanently Marked; 4. Pictures Presented to Schools or Public In- 
stitutions; 5. Medals Presented to Schools or Public Institutions; 
6. Books Presented to Schools or Public Institutions; 7. Flags Pre- 
sented to Schools or Public Institutions; 8. Statuary Presented to 
Schools or Public Institutions; 9. Money Prizes Presented for Essays; 
10. School Addresses or Celebrations; 11. General Public Celebrations; 

12. Days and Events Celebrated by Society (not for general public) ; 

13. Special Patriotic Work; 14. Special Historical Work; 15. Does 
Society Maintain a Library? 16. Does Society Issue a Periodical? 

17. List of Society's Publications, with Dates and Brief Description; 

18. Names of Members of National or Wide Reputation, Living and 
Deceased. 

The data received in response to the above request have been com- 
piled by the Historian General, who will report thereon to the present 
Congress. 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

Moved (by Frederick PL Clarke, of New Jersey) that the report 
of the Secretary General be received with thanks, accepted, and placed 
on tile. 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: The next report is that of the Registrar 
General, Mr. A. Howard Clark. 

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL. 

Compatriots: The Registrar General has the honor to report that the 
total enrollment of lineal descendants of soldiers, sailors, and patriots 
of the Revolution since the National Society of Sons of the American 
Revolution was organized in Fraunce's Tavern, New York city, on 
April 30, 1889, has been 20,261. 

The number of new members added during the past year has been 
1,040, and the present number of active members, after deducting losses 
by death, resignation, and other causes, is 11,515. 

There are now forty- tour State Societies, new Societies having been 
organized in New Mexico and Idaho since the Buffalo Congress. The 
required number of applicants resident in Mississippi have filed papers 



86 SONS 01'" Till; AMERICAN UKVOIyUTJON 

proving their eligibility, and the Mississippi Society will be chartered 

as soon as organization is perfected. The Committee on Organization 

is actively at work in North Dakota, Georgia, and South Carolina, and 

it is hoped that before many months new Societies will be formed in 
those vStates. 

In numerical strength the Massachusetts Society still leads, with 1,635 
members; next, New York, with 1,328 members, and Connecticut, 1,059 
members, followed by Ohio, Illinois, and the District of Columbia, with 
about 550 each. 

The following statement shows the total membership on March 31 
and the number of new members enrolled in each State Society during 
the year ended March 31, 1909 : 

New members. Total. 

Alabama 5 30 

Arizona 3 46 

Arkansas 27 

California 27 398 

Colorado 113 245 

Connecticut 91 1,059 

Delaware o 76 

District of Columbia 42 534 

Florida 10 29 

France o 15 

Hawaiian 6 89 

Idaho Apr. 8 20 

Illinois 58 544 

Indiana 39 161 

Iowa 25 252 

Kansas 5 84 

Kentucky 4 70 

Louisiana 8 83 

Maine 24 387 

Maryland 44 231 

Massachusetts 120 1,635 

Michigan 35 378 

Minnesota 19 365 

Missouri ■>• ' 6 104 

Montana 41 

Nebraska 7 113 

New Hampshire 10 309 

New Jersey 34 396 

New Mexico 3 22 

New York (Empire State) 113 1,328 

Ohio 34 471 

Oklahoma 9 30 

Oregon 14 85 

Pennsylvania 38 536 

Rhode Island 15 301 

South Dakota o 10 

Tennessee 16 96 

Texas : 4 86 

Utah 8 76 

Vermont 17 280 

Virginia 6 66 

Washington 23 203 

Wisconsin 8 176 

Wyoming 6 28 

1,049 11,515 



PROCEEDINGS 01* BALTIMORE CONGRESS 87 

The above statistics arc based upon reports from State Societies as 
to the number of members carried upon their rolls. The Registrar 
General, however, feels if his duty to call the attention of the Congress 
to the still varied policies of State Societies as to what constitutes active 
enrollment, rendering it sometimes difficult to strike an harmonious 
total. The use of standard blanks, adopted since the last Congress, for 
reporting by name all changes in membership rolls, has largely en- 
hanced the value of returns by making them more uniform, and it is 
hoped that efforts to harmonize State policies in regard to membership 
may be continued. 

The increase of 1,049 new members during the year is 202 more than 
during the previous year, and more than 25 per cent above the average 
for the past six years. 

It is regretted that the losses during the year have been exceptionally 
large, including about 200 deaths, so that the net increase in total active 
membership is not as great as was expected, in view of the special 
efforts made during the year. 

The results, however, have tended toward a more consistent and 
efficient organization — a fact that should not be overlooked* 

Two actual sons of soldiers of the Revolution have been enrolled 
during the year, making 188 since the Society was organized. 

The necrology of the year has been published in the Official BuujJ- 
TIN. The Registrar General may here record the names of some of the 
more widely-known members who have died since the last Congress : 

Rear Admiral Arthur Burtis, U. S. Navy. 

Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D., ex-Chaplain General. 

Daniel Coit Gilman, IX. D., ex-President of Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity and of Carnegie Institution of Washington. 

Brig. Gen. Harry Leland Haskell, U. S. Army. 

Daniel R. Noyes, ex-President of the Minnesota Society. 

Ira D. Sankey, evangelist. 

Rear Admiral Charles M. Thomas, U. S. Navy, life member of the 
District of Columbia Society. 

lion. Peter White, of Michigan. 

There have been issued 587 certificates of membership, and permits 
for the purchase of insignia have been issued in the name of every new 
member. The official jewelers have filled all orders promptly, and the 
Society has received the customary commission on all sales, the total 
commission to date being $1,341.50. 

Diplomas and medals have been awarded to 22 compatriots i<*v their 
patriotic service in the War with Spain in 1898. These medals were 
first awarded under a resolution adopted at the Detroit Congress, on 
May 1, 1899, the first anniversary of the Battle of Manila Bay, when 
a cable message of congratulation w r as sent to Compatriot Admiral 
Dewey. Nearly 700 members of this Society have been awarded medals 
for their service in that war. Those honored during the past year were 
as follows : 



88 



SON*S Ol' Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



G. Barrett Rich, Jr., Burfalo, New York. 

First Lieutenant 65th Regt. Infantry, N. G. N. Y., from July 20, 
1897, to November 19, 189S. 
Guy Laverne Fake, Newark, New Jersey. 

Private Co. '%," 2d Regiment New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. 
George D. Guyer, Brookings, South Dakota. 

Captain 16th U. S. Infantry. 
Eugene B. McDonald, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sergeant 5th U. S. Infantry at Tampa and at Santiago, Cuba. 
Sumner Kimball Prescott, Marinette, Wisconsin. 

Corporal 1st Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
Edward Cornelius Hanford, Seattle, Washington. 

Corporal 1st Washington Volunteer Infantry. 
Molyneaux Lawrence Turner, Washington, D. C. 

Surgeon 2d U. S. Infantry. 
William Porter Moffet, Fort Sheridan, Illinois. 

Captain 1st North Dakota Infantry, 1898. 
Harold £lake, Washington, D. C. 

Corporal Co. "C," 18th United States Infantry. 
Henry Fuller Punderson, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Enlisted in U. S. Navy June 15, 1898. Discharged from U. S. S. 
Minnesota and from the Naval Service August 26, 1898. 
Joseph Strong Stringham, Detroit, Michigan. 

Landsman; served from the 29th of April, 1898, to August 22, 1898. 
Russell W. Lewis, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Corporal 4th Battery, New York Light Artillery Volunteers. 
George W. Dulany, Jr., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Seaman; served from 15th day of June, 1898; discharged from 
U. S. S. Minnesota 25th day of August, 1S98. 
Wilbur Clyde Deeds, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

Corporal 10th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and nth Co. Signal Corps. 
Bertram Grandage Dickinson, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

First Lieutenant Co. "M," 1st Infantry, Minnesota National Guard. 
Edward S. Person, Minot, North Dakota. 

Major 14th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. 
Walter Kimball Neal, St. James, Minnesota. 

Sergeant 1st Company of the Signal Corps, U. S. Volunteers. 
Harold Hurd, Roswell, New Mexico. 

Served (from the N. Y. Naval Militia) on U. S. Steamship Yankee, 
and served in Cuba. 
Elias Bunn Wilcox, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

Captain Co. "PI," 2d U. S. Volunteer Infantry. 
Emmett Leroy Kidd, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Captain 1st Louisiana Infantry. 
Stephen Miller Fnote, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Major 3d U. S. Volunteer Engineers. 
Seaman A. Knapp, of Iowa. 

Major 1st Louisiana Infantry. 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BAt/riMORE CONGRESS 89 

Shortly after the adjournment of the annual Congress held in Denver 
in 1907 the Colorado Society adopted the following resolution: 

Resolved, That the Colorado Society offer as a prize to the National 
Society a banner, to be known as the Traveling Banner, to be awarded 
to any State organization of the Sons of the American Revolution 
having a membership of one hundred or more for the largest percentage 
of increase in numbers during the year preceding, said banner to be 
assigned annually to such State Society at the annual meeting of the 
National Congress. 

The banner thus tendered was accepted by the Executive Committee, 
and was awarded for the first time, in accordance with the foregoing 
resolution, at the Congress held in the city of Buffalo. 

As the donor of the banner the Colorado Society withdrew from the 
competition, otherwise the award would have been made to that Society. 
Thereupon the award was made to the Society having the next highest 
percentage, and the flag was duly presented to the Iowa Society. 

During the past year the Colorado Society has again enrolled the 
largest percentage of new members, and is again entitled to the award 
of the Traveling Banner. The Maryland Society stands second. 

At the meeting of the Executive Committee held in the city of 
Buffalo May 2, 190S, a member of the Society generously tendered a 
full-sized gold insignia of the National Society as a prize to be awarded 
at the next annual Congress to the State Society which, in proportion 
to its numerical size, shall show the largest number of sons of members 
enrolled during the year ending April 30, 1909. The offer thus made 
was gratefully accepted by the Executive Committee, and the insignia 
has since been placed subject to the order of the Secretary General. 

The announcement of this prize and the terms connected therewith 
were accordingly made to the several State Societies in a circular dated 
June 6, 1908, and in the OtfFiciAi, Bui,u;tin. 

It is understood to be the intent of the donor that the Society receiv- 
ing the insignia shall designate the individual member to whom the 
same shall be presented. 

The Registrar General reports that one of the western State Societies 
appears to be entitled to the award of the above insignia, having in 
proportion to its membership enrolled the largest number of sons of 
members during the past year, but the necessity of verifying some of 
the records will delay announcement for a few hours. 

The Registrar General has on many occasions called attention to the 
large proportion of men of eminence who are enrolled in the ranks of 
this Society — men who are leaders in the highest sense in all honorable 
callings — an indication that men of inherited American principles arc 
guiding the political affairs of the nation and the great industries of this 
country. It seems proper also to mention the fact that more than 
25,000 of the participants in the War for Independence are represented 
on the rolls of the Society by their lineal descendants — men who are 
constantly ready if need be to risk their lives in patriotic work, as 
evidenced by the fact that nearly 700 members were enrolled in the 
army and navy of the United States during the War with Spain. 



(JO SONS 01 f THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

It is a matter of pride that the blood of Patrick Henry, Thomas 
Jefferson, Israel Putnam, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, Richard 
Henry Lee, Lafayette, Daniel Boone, Gen. Joseph Warren, Gen. 
Nathanael Greene, and of thousands of others who helped to bring 
victory to the American cause in the struggle from 1775 to 1783, 
courses in the veins of members of this organization, and that the prin- 
ciples and institutions established by that struggle are fittingly upheld 
and broadened by the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

One of the objects of this Society is to search out and to preserve the 
official records of the Revolution, and to secure their publication wher- 
ever feasible. During the past year there has been continued the com- 
pilation on cards of information buried in the applications of the 60,000 
who were granted pensions for their services. This work' will be reported 
upon by the committee on that work. The State of Pennsylvania has 
issued a fifth series of archives, in which there is brought together the 
rolls of soldiers, with a two-volume index. Connecticut, through the 
State Historical Society, has published an additional volume of rolls 
with mdny names not heretofore printed, and giving the residence of 
most of the soldiers. Virginia has unearthed a mass of records of 1776 
to 1783, and the State Librarian is struggling with greatly inadequate 
assistance to render the material available. The Virginia Society is 
urged to take proper steps to give efficient aid toward the preparation 
of these records for publication at an early date. 

The United States government: has by legislative enactment provided 
for the bringing together in the War and Navy Departments of material 
scattered in various executive archives, and the time is approaching 
when efforts should be made to secure publication. 

The Registrar General again thanks the officers of the State Societies 
for their cooperation with him in the effort to preserve the records of 
membership in good form — a task oftentimes requiring considerable 
patience on the part of all concerned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. Howard Ci.ark, 

Registrar General. 

It was moved that the report of the Registrar General be received as 
read and placed on hie. 

Seconded and carried. 

Dr. Ci.arkson N. Guyer: Ladies and gentlemen: I rise simply to 
state that Colorado this year withdraws from the contest for the travel- 
ing prize banner, but that she wishes to give notice that this next year 
she is going to enter the contest. But at this Congress she withdraws, 
from the contest. (Applause.) 

The President General: You have heard the very magnanimous 
statement of Vice-President General Guyer. As President General I 
can only say that, in view of what has just fallen from Dr. Guycr's lips, 
and inasmuch as Colorado is now in the contest, it behooves us all to- 
be alert. 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



9 1 



With regard to one matter in the Secretary General's report, you will 
recall that further information was called for in connection with the 
award of the insignia. What is your pleasure — to have a committee 
which shall, upon the receipt of such information, verify the percentages 
of the Secretary General and make a report at a later stage, or leave 
that to the Secretary General? 

Voicr-s : Leave it to the Secretary General. 

The President General: We will now herir the report of the Histo- 
rian General, Walter Kendall Watkins, of Massachusetts. 

Mr. De Caindry: Inasmuch as the report of the Historian General 
will necessarily be quite extensive and we will have lots of business to 
transact during the rest of this session, and especially as the report of 
the Historian General has appeared from time to time in the Year Book, 
I move that its reading at this time be dispensed with. 

The President General: The Chair thinks at this time, before put- 
ting the motion, that it is only fair to our Historian General to present 
him to the Congress, for while he knows a great many members per- 
sonally, there are some who want to know him a little better than they 
have yet had the opportunity of doing, and while I am sure he will be 
very glad to be relieved from reading the necessarily voluminous report, 
I would like to ask the Historian General if he could not give us, 
without reading it in extenso, a general idea of the subject covered, 
and so on. 

Mr. De Caindry: Let me say in this connection that my motion was 
not intended in the slightest degree to reflect upon our compatriot, the 
Historian General. It is only on account of the very extensive report 
that I make the motion that it be accepted and printed in the proceed- 
ings of the Congress and the full reading of it dispensed with now. 

The President Genekal: I am not so sure that the report will be 
very extensive. If it should develop to be unduly so I think the His- 
torian General can check it himself. 

Mr. Watkins: Mr. President General, Compatriots: I am not a little 
pleased to hear Compatriot De Caindry's motion. I came from chilly 
New England expecting to find delightful weather here in Washington 
and Baltimore, but I have a very bad cold as a result of a three days' 
visit here, and for that reason I am very glad for his motion and I 
should prefer not !o give any of my report, for in speaking of one 
Society's work I might slight the work of another State Society, and 
I think it is best as moved by the compatriot from Washington, that my 
report be presented and, if the Congress thinks (it, put it into print. 
(Applause.) 

The President General: You have heard the report of the Historian 
General, coupled with the motion of the delegate from the District of 
Columbia Society, (hat the full report of the Historian General be 
printed in and as a part of the proceedings of this Congress. All those 
in favor of the motion will signify their approval in the usual manner. 

Carried. 



()2 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN GENERAL. 
Walter Kendall Watkins. 

The story of the birth of the "Sons of the American Revolution" in 
San Francisco, on October 5, 1S75, as "The Sons of Revolutionary 
Sires," has been concisely told by my predecessor in the office of Histo- 
rian General, Mr. Henry Hall (1891-1897). He was a member of the 
Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and of 
the Society of Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York when, 
in 1890, he compiled his valuable history in the "Year Book of the 
Societies composed of Descendants of the Men of the Revolution." 

An exhaustive and illustrated article on the formation of the "Sons 
of Revolutionary Sires" was also published in the Overland Monthly 
in 1895, written by Mr. F. E. Myers. 

The history of the National and State Societies, including the origin 
of the California Society in 1875, together with membership rolls and 
full pedigrees back to Revolutionary ancestors, was published in the 
"National Register," issued in 1902 under the auspices of the National 
Society through a private publisher. ' 

The history of the National Society during each year has been given 
in the National Year Books issued by the Secretary General. In these 
Year Books may be found the proceedings, meetings of the Annual 
Congress, the doings of the Board of Managers and national com- 
mittees^ and the work of the several State Societies each year, from 
1891 to 1908. 

Many vital questions have been discussed, and the energies of the 
National and State Societies have been exerted in many patriotic direc- 
tions. The marking of historic sites and the resting-places of thousands 
of soldiers who fought in the heroic struggle we commemorate; the 
prevention of the use of the flag for unworthy purposes, and its venera- 
tion and the observance of Flag Day; the teaching of the lessons of 
good citizenship and the presenting of the examples shown by the men 
of the Revolution; the preservation and publication of the records of 
the Revolutionary period and the history of Revolutionary events and 
the actors therein; the stimulus of prizes to the youth of the present 
day for their thoughts as to the struggle and the causes thereof — all 
these have to a great extent occupied the various branches of our 
organization and our membership in the past two decades. This is 
shown by a perusal of the proceedings of the meetings of the Annual 
Congress, and by the work of the State Societies as presented in the 
present brief review, which has been compiled from data furnished in 
response to questions contained in a circular issued by the National 
Executive Committee. 

The Alabama Society was organized at Mobile June 27, T903, and 
now has a membership of twenty-nine. The annual meeting is on 
Washington's Birthday. Its members and officers are mostly resident 
in Mobile. 

The Arizona Society, organized at Phoenix June 13, 1896, has a 
present membership of fifty-five. The annual meeting and banquet takes 
place on Washington's Birthday. Flag Day is also appropriately ob- 
served. The greater part of the membership and officers of the Society 
reside in Phoenix. Through the instrumentality of this Society the 
I). A. R. of Arizona was formed in 1900. 

Tile Arkansas Society, organized at Little Rock April 20, 1889, has 
a. membership of twenty-seven. Its membership in 1901 exceeded fifty. 
The annual meeting is held on Washington's Birthday. 

The California Society, instituted October 22, 1875. as the "Sons 
of Revolutionary Sires," changed its name March 22, 1800, to "Sons of 















• . 






PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



93 



the American Revolution." Its annual meeting was formerly held in 
January, hut now takes place on April 19. Washington's Birthday is 
celebrated by a banquet in San Francisco, where most of the officers 
arc resident. Yorktown Day, in October, has also been observed by a 
banquet, and social affairs have been held in conjunction with the 
D. A. R. A local Chapter has been formed at Los Angeles. The First 
Annual Congress, held at Louisville in 1890, honored Colonel A. S. 
Hubbard, first President of the California State Society, by entering 
his name on the roll of past Presidents General of the National Society. 
Many historical papers of interest have been delivered at different 
gatherings of the Society in San Francisco. The Society, now number- 
ing four hundred and twenty-four members, is collecting funds for the 
erection of a monument to Washington — the first to be erected in 
California. 

The Colorado Society was organized at Denver July 4, 1896. The 
animal meeting is held at Denver on April 19, and the annual banquet 
on Washington's Birthday. Flag Day and Independence Day have also 
been observed, and memorial services held on Lincoln's Birthday and 
Memorial Day (May 30). In some of these celebrations the Sons of 
the Revolution have joined. 

In 1906 the Society was prominent under its former President, Gen- 
eral Irving Hale, at the Pike's Peak centennial celebration. 

Within the past five years addresses have been delivered at schools in 
Denver and other places in the State. During the season from Septem- 
ber to March, for thirteen years, at the monthly meetings historical 
papers have been read. 

For over eight years there has been in Colorado a State law against 
the desecration of the Flag — a law which was framed by the Society, 
pioneers in this movement. 

The Eighteenth Congress of the National Society was held at Den- 
ver in June, 1907, when the members in Colorado vied with nature in 
providing a superb entertainment. This visit resulted in the formation 
of a Chapter April 29, 1908, at Colorado Springs, also a Chapter at 
Greeley, and awakened an interest that doubled the membership in the 
State Society and has led to the formation of Societies in Wyoming, 
New Mexico, and Idaho. The moving spirit in this recent growth of 
our organization has been Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, of Denver, whose 
labors in the North and West have been continuous and fruitful. The 
interest taken by Colorado members was shown by their presentation 
at Buffalo of the "Traveling Banner" and the announcement of their 
intention to compete for it in the future. Their membership at Buffalo 
was one hundred and eighty-seven, and the total announced at Balti- 
more in 1909 will practically evidence their continued interest. An 
annual hand-book issued by the Slate Society is an important feature 
of their work. The Denver Chapter has recently been organized, con- 
sisting of residents of Denver and of all other Colorado members not 
included in the Colorado Springs and Greeley Chapters. 

The Connecticut Society was organized April 2, 1889. Its annual 
meeting is on May 10, to commemorate the capture of Fort Ticonderoga 
by an expedition from Connecticut. The Second Annual Congress of 
the National Society was held at Hartford in 1891 and the Fourteenth 
Annual Congress at New Haven in 1903. The annual banquet is held- 
on February 22, and the twentieth, in 1909, at the Strat field Hotel, 
Bridgeport, participated in by three hundred representative citizens, 
shows the standing of the Society in that State and the active interest 
of its membership. Another feature for several years was the award 
annually of one hundred dollars in ten prizes, in the high and grammar 
schools of the State, for essays on subjects connected with the American 
Revolution. Over fourteen hundred graves of Revolutionary soldiers 



94 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

and patriots in Connecticut bear the marker designed by a member of 
the Society. In 1891 the War Office of the Council of Safety in Leba- 
non was bought, and repaired at a cost of $800, and in 1896 a suitably 
inscribed bronze tablet was placed upon it. In 1894 a tablet was placed 
on the Washington Elm at Hartford. In 1S95 a tablet was placed on 
Beacon Hill, New Haven. In 1901, at a cost of $6,000, the "Nathan 
Hale School House" at New London was purchased and restored. This 
was the building in which Nathan Hale taught during the year prior to 
the outbreak of the Revolution, in 1775. In 1904 the residence of Roger 
Sherman at New Haven was marked by a bronze tablet. Year Books 
have been issued for 1891, 1892, 1893-4, 1895-6, 1897-9, 1900-3, the last 
a volume of eight hundred and fifty-four pages. 

The membership of the Society is ten hundred and twenty-five. On 
the roll have appeared the names of four governors of the State, sena- 
tors and representatives, and many local officials. On the membership 
roll may be especially noted General E. S. Greeley, former President 
General of the National Society, and Jonathan Trumbull, Vice-President 
General. Local Chapters or branches have been formed in New Haven, 
Meriden, Bridgeport, Norwich, Norwalk, and New London. 

The General David Humphreys branch, of New Haven, has published 
"Songs of the American Revolution" and other matters of interest. 

In 1S90 the Connecticut Society first started the observance of "Flag 
Day," which has now become so general throughout the country. 

The DELAWARE Society was organized January 29, 1889, and now 
has over eighty members, a large number residing in Wilmington. The 
annual meeting is held December 7, to commemorate the ratification of 
the Constitution of the United States by Delaware. 

In 1901 the Society unveiled at Cooch's Bridge, Delaware, a hand- 
some memorial in Delaware granite, where the Stars and Stripes was 
first unfurled in battle, September 3, 1777. Among the men of note 
members of this Society may be mentioned the late Hon. Thomas F. 
Bayard, Ambassador to Great Britain, and the former President of the 
Society. 

TnE District oe Columbia Society was organized April 19, 1890. 
In its membership are many officers of the Army and Navy, Members 
of Congress, of the Supreme Court, and officials of the executive de- 
partments of the Government. On its membership roll will be found 
men of national reputation. The present membership -is five hundred 
and fifty, though many more names appear on the rolls that have been 
transferred or passed away, The annual meeting is held at noon on 
February 22. Monthly meetings are held from October or November ^ 
to April, at which historical papers are read or patriotic addresses 
delivered, some of which are in print. 

The Society has aided in securing monuments to Lafayette and 
Rochambeau. Bronze markers have been placed on the graves of 
Elbridgc Gerry; George Clinton, George Mason, and other eminent 
patriots. Medals have been given to pupils in the public schools for 
•essays on Revolutionary topics, and in 1900 miniature flags were sent 
to the public schools in Manila, Honolulu, and Porto Rico. In 1901 
there was a presentation of 43,832 (lags to the public school children 
in Washington. A large Hag was presented to the Daughters of the 
American Revolution for Continental Memorial Mall, and Hags have 
been given to the Newsboys' Home and the Washington Light Infantry 
Corps of the District of Columbia. 

The Society has participated in many of the celebrations held at the 
National Capital, and many members have delivered addresses at the 
annual celebrations of Washington's Birthday, Flag Day, and Memorial 
Day in the public schools. 



PROCEEDINGS OI- BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



'AS 



The Society has observed many anniversaries of events of the Revo- 
lution by patriotic meetings and banquets, at which addresses have been 
delivered by members and distinguished guests. The Society's exhibit 
at the World's Fair, to illustrate civic and religious liberty since the 
Revolution, was noteworthy. The efforts of its members for the pre- 
vention of desecration of the flag and for the observance of Flag Day 
have been untiring. 

Located in the National Capital, it has had opportunities to secure 
the preservation of the records of the Army and Navy of the Revolution 
and the "Orders of General Washington." 

During the War with Spain the Society was most active in practical 
work, many of its members being actively engaged in the field and in 
hospital work, and subscriptions were given for hospital work. 

Year Books were published in 1891, 1896, and 1897, and historical 
addresses of special interest by the members have been printed. Mem- 
bers of the Society have also been active on national committees, espe- 
cially in having printed pamphlets for the instruction of aliens as to the 
duties of good citizens. 

The Society maintains a library of some six hundred volumes and 
live hundred pamphlets. 

The Congress of 1894 and that of 1902 were held in the city of 
Washington. 

Tniv Florida Society was organized March 14, 1896, and nearly all 
its membership reside in Pensacola, the total being thirty-five. The 
annual meeting is on Washington's Birthday, at which time a banquet 
is also enjoyed. 

The Society in France of the Sons of the American Revolution was 
organized September 16, 1897, at Paris, mainly through the efforts of 
Lieutenant Walter J. Sears, U. S. N., and was greatly assisted in its 
growth by former President General Horace Porter while Ambassador 
to France. At the unveiling of the statue to Washington in Paris and 
monuments to Lafayette and Rochambeau the members were present as 
an organization. The membership includes descendants of Lafayette 
and of other Frenchmen whose ancestors performed illustrious service 
in America during the Revolution. 

It was through the persistent efforts of General Horace Porter, Colo- 
nel Chaille-Long, and others as a committee of the Society in France 
that the rolls of the soldiers and sailors of France who served in the 
American Revolution were published by the French government. To 
General Porter, too, belongs the honor of accomplishing that most 
patriotic work, the finding of the remains of Admiral John Paul Tones 
and their transfer to America for burial at Annapolis. 

The Hawaiian Society was organized at Honolulu June ij, 1896, 
and includes in its membership of one hundred Rev. Dr. Bishop, ex- 
Governor Carter, and oilier prominent men of the Islands. 

Its patriotic work has been directed towards the education of the 
children of the mixed population by offering prizes for orations and 
essays on patriotic subjects. It has also distributed its Year Books of 
1896 and 1900 in the advanced schools and library in Honolulu. The 
annual meeting on Bunker Hill Day, and social observances of Wash- 
ington's Birthday and Yorktovvn Day have greatly advanced its in- 
terests. The Society has a collection of about seventy volumes and sixty 
pamphlets. 

after several preliminary meetinp 
with General George Crook, I 
ee ting is held (in I )eccnibcr 3, to e 
into the Union. 



The Illinois Society 
ized January i.|, 1800 
President. The annual 
the admission of llliuoi 



was organ- 

S. A., as 

n una in >rate 






CjG SONS OF Till' AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

In 1903 the Society, in cooperation with the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution and the Sons of the Revolution, placed a boulder 
marked with a tablet on the grave, in Lincoln Park, of David Kenison, 
the last survivor of the Boston Tea Party. Engravings of the Decla- 
ration of Independence have been presented to the public schools by 
Oak Park Chapter, and statuettes of George Rogers Clark and the 
"Minute Man" have been given in conjunction with the Daughters of 
the American Revolution. Two of its active members, former President 
General N. A. McClary and former President Josiah L. Lombard, have 
given prizes of one hundred dollars each for essays on subjects relating 
to the Revolution. The Society has celebrated Lexington and York- 
town days, and participated in many patriotic entertainments and 
exercises. 

Through its Flag Committee it secured the passage of a State law 
prohibiting the use of the Flag for advertising purposes, and also pro- 
moted the observance of Flag Day. A flag was also presented by a 
member, Mr. La Verne W. Noyes, to one of the schools. The Society 
published Year Books in 1894, 1896, 1906, and 1907. An "Annual Hand 
Book" is issued, the last number (1909) containing information of 
special value to prospective members. The total membership is now 
five hundred and forty-three. Chapters have been organized in Spring- 
field, Bloomington, Evanston, Rock Island, Monmouth, ami Oak Park. 
These Chapters are engaged in local work, the most recent example 
being the memorial tablet placed by Springfield Chapter February 12, 
1909, on the site of the first law office of Abraham Lincoln. The Con- 
gress of 1893 was entertained by the Illinois Society. 

The; Indiana Society was organized January 15, 1890, in the office 
of the Secretary of State. Among its members may be mentioned Hon. 
William H. English, who proposed and secured, with others of the 
Society, the erection by the State of a bronze statue in Indianapolis to 
General George Rogers Clark. The annual meeting is held February 
25, to commemorate the capture of Fort Sackville, Vincennes, Indiana. 

The membership now numbers one hundred and sixty-one, and in- 
cludes Chapters in Fort Wayne, Huntington, and Terre Haute. 

The Society has offered a prize of twenty dollars to the colleges of 
the State for the best essay on "Robert Morris, the Financier of the 
Revolution." Numerous portraits have been presented to various local 
educational institutions. The Society published volumes in 1899 and 
190S, and is engaged in the publication of the Revolutionary pensioners 
in Indiana in 1840. The books collected by the Society are deposited in 
the public library at Indianapolis. 

The Iowa Society was organized September 5, 1893, at Des Moines. 
In 1904 the Society erected in the Historical Department Building in 
that city a bronze tablet to the memory of \\\c Revolutionary soldiers 
buried in Iowa. It has also assisted in procuring State appropriations 
for granite monuments. 

In 1S98 a stand of colors was presented to the 50th Iowa National 
Guard, which participated in the War with Spain. 

The Society has at the present time a competition in progress for 
twenty-five bronze medals, offered to the colleges and schools of the 
State for the best work done in the studv of the history of the United 
States. 

The annual meeting is on April T9, Lexington Day, on which day 
and on Washington's Birthday banquets have been held or patriotic 
addresses delivered. 

The membership is now about two hundred and forty, which includes 
Chapters in Chariton, Des Moines, Waterloo, Keokuk, Ottumwa, Ames, 
and Sioux City. The work of these Chapters may be instanced by the 



PROCUUDINGS OF liAVriMORE CONGRESS 



97 



Franklin Chapter of 

A useful and unique 

ion, "The Old Conti- 

lvc been issued as a 



statement that over fifty able papers on topies pertaining to the Revolu- 
tionary War have been delivered before Ben 
Des Moines, some of which have been printed, 
feature of the .State organization is the public; 
nerital," of which some forty-three numbers 1 
bi-monthly. 

The Kansas Society was organized March 31, 1892, at Topeka, and 

now has a membership of about one hundred. In connection with the 
Kansas Historical Society it has been active in preserving the relics of 
the past. The annual meeting is held on the third Wednesday in 
January. Washington's Birthday and Independence Day are observed 
annually. 

The Kentucky Society was organized at Frankfort April 8, 1889, 
through the efforts of General Simon B. Buckner. The present mem- 
bership is over eighty, and the officers are chiefly resident in Louisville 
and vicinity. There considerable interest is shown in patriotic matters, 
in connection with similar organizations formed by the ladies. The 
annual meeting, October 19, commemorates the surrender of Cornwallis. 
The First Congress of the National Society was held at Louisville on 
April 30, 1890. 

The Louisiana Society was organized May 16, 1893, at New Orleans, 
where most of its members are resident. It is active and has a member- 
ship of seventy-six. The annual meeting has usually been held on 
Washington's Birthday. Independence Day is also observed. 

The Society contributed forty dollars to the cost of a silver service to 
the battleship Louisiana. 

The Maine Society was organized March 14, 1891, at Portland, and 

has a membership at. the present time of three hundred and fifty-six. 
The eighteenth annual meeting and banquet was held on February 22, 
1909, with an attendance of one hundred and thirty-eight members and 
guests. With a large number of Vice-Presidents — one in each county 
of the State — it has created an active interest in the Society, and re- 
sulted in the marking of the graves of thirteen hundred and thirteen 
men who served in the Revolutionary War. Many members have 
contributed valuable historical papers, which have been published in 
the Society's annual proceedings and elsewhere. Notable among these 
are the works of Mr. Nathan Goold, on the regiments from the District 
of Maine serving in the Revolution. Through the Society's efforts an 
appropriation was obtained for placing a memorial boulder and bronze 
tablet on the Valley Forge reservation to the memory of the soldiers of 
Maine at Valley Forge. 

The Maryland Society was organized April 20, 1889, in the Senate 

Chamber at Annapolis as the ''Maryland Society of Sons of the Revo- 
lution." In a few months the name was altered to "Sons of the 
American Revolution." The annual meeting is on October 10, to com- 
memorate the burning of the brig Peggy Stewart at Annapolis in 177.J. 
In the winter of 1776-7 the Continental Congress met in Baltimore. 
Through the efforts of the Society a bronze tablet was placed on the 
site. In 1904, the building having been destroyed in the great lire of that 
year, it was necessary to replace the tablet, which was done in 1907. 
The heroic service rendered by Smallwood's Regiment of Maryland men 
at the Battle of Long Island, was commemorated by the Society in the 
erection of a monument at Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Long Island, in 
1895. 'fhe monument, oi Tennessee marble, twenty-nine feet high, cost 
three thousand dollars. A granite monument, six feel high, was also 
erected to the memory of their commander, Major-General William 



9§ 



SONS 01' Tlllv AMERICAN REVOLUTION 






Smallwood, in Charles County, Maryland. The cost of this monument, 
of Woodstock granite, was three hundred dollars, from the funds of the 
Society. It is placed over his grave, near the Smallwood Mansion, 
about thirty miles below Washington. 

In 1901 on "Peggy Stewart" Day, after eleven years of strenuous 
efforts to obtain the contributions, the Society dedicated a granite shaft 
to the glory of the "Maryland Line." 

"The Maryland Revolutionary Monument," eighty feet high, costing 
twenty thousand dollars, and surmounted by a statue of the Goddess of 
Liberty, is one of the striking features of Baltimore. This was erected 
largely through the efforts of this Society. 

In 1907 the Society, with other patriotic bodies, .protested against the 
abandonment of Fort McHenry as a military post, and to preserve its 
military character the Society, with others, have procured gun carriages 
for mounting cannon on its ramparts. 

The Society in the past made a contribution towards the purchase of 
General George Washington's Bible by the Mount Vernon Ladies' As- 
sociation. 

In 1902 the Society issued a volume containing a short compiled his- 
tory of Maryland, with the causes of the Revolution. An account was 
also given of the "Maryland Line," and the monuments to their bravery. 
The story of "Peggy Stewart's" Day was also given. 

The Society has a membership of two hundred and thirty. 

The Massachusetts Society was organized April 19, 1889, and the 
annual meeting has since been held on that date. On Yorktown Day in 
18X9 a Field Day was held at Concord, and a Fall Field Day has been 
held yearly on that date, in some one of the historic towns of New 
England. Excursions to these towns have also taken place at other 
dates in the summer season, and Washington's Birthday is observed 
annually with a banquet and patriotic addresses. 

In T892 the State Society suggested to the National Society the chang- 
ing of the colors of the rosette and ribbon from red and white to the 
"Continental Colors." It was in this year also the Society voted that all 
its actual sons of Revolutionary soldiers he made honorary members, 
and at the same time began to agitate the abolishment of Fast Day in 
Massachusetts and the establishment of the nineteenth of April as 
Patriot's Day and a general holiday in the State, which is now an ac- 
complished fact. 

In 1893 the Society published its first Year Book, which gave a history 
of the Society to that date. In that year the Society accepted a design, 
submitted by a commitce, for a marker to be placed on the graves of 
Revolutionary soldiers, and thousands of them have been placed on 
graves in many States. 

Early in 1891 a committee was appointed to report as to the best 
means of procuring the publication of Revolutionary documents de- 
posited in Washington. In that year also the second Year Book was 
issued. 

On Yorktown Day, in 1894, a marker was placed on the grave of 
Lafayette in Paris, .and two of Ins great-great-grandsons elected to 
honorary membership. 

On September 13, 1895, a petition was received from seventeen mem- 
bers, residing in Springfield, for authority to form a Chapter. As no 
provision existed in the Constitution this was not granted, but the re- 
quest brought about the formation of Chapters. On October 31, 1895, 
charters were granted for the organization of Chapters in the cities of 
Salem, Boston, and Springfield, and later in other cities of the Common- 
wealth. 

In 1895 the Society suggested the gift by the Commonwealth of the 
Massachusetts Building at the Exposition in Atlanta, to lie placed in 



PROCEEDINGS 01' P.AI/HMOl 



CONGRESS 



99 



the care of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Tn that same 
year the Society adopted a resolution against the use of the National 
Flag for advertising. 

[n January, 1896, the Society placed a marker on the grave of Frank- 
lin in Philadelphia. In that same year the Society was prominent in 
the agitation for the preservation of the "Bui (inch Front" of the State 
House. At this time also a resolution was presented setting forth the 
value of the study of the early history of the country, and the forms of 
National and State government in the public schools. 

Fn 1S96 markers were placed on the graves of those Signers of the 
Declaration of Independence buried in Massachusetts, and one was also 
placed on the grave of Patrick" Henry. 

Tn 1897 a large volume was issued by the Society, giving its history 
from 1894 to 1897, and extended accounts of the services of Revolu- 
tionary ancestors of members. Volumes were also issued in 1899, 1901, 
1904, and 1907. The volume in 1901 included a list of the soldiers and 
sailors whose graves had been marked by the marker designed by the 
Society. 

Tn 1901 a bronze tablet was placed on the grave of General John 
Grcaton. In 1003 bronze tablets were placed in Dorchester and Roslin- 
dale, where numbers of the soldiers of the Revolution were buried in 
unmarked graves. 

In 1905 a tablet was placed on the site of the General John Brooks 
house in Medford. 

The Society also contributed part of the funds for the following ob- 
jects: Preservation of the "Hancock-Clarke House," Lexington, two 
hundred dollars. Preservation of the "Old North Church," Boston, 
fifty dollars. The "Prison-ship Martyr's Monument," Brooklyn, two 
hundred dollars. To preserve the "Paul Revere House," Boston, one 
hundred dollars. For preservation of the "Royall House," Medford, 
Mass., two hundred and fifty dollars. 

One hundred iron markers and twenty-five bronze have been placed 
by the Society on graves of soldiers. Portraits of Washington and his 
wife, Jefferson, Franklin, Jay and Madison ; Busts of Warren and 
Lafayette ; and engravings of the "Boston Massacre" and the "Concord 
Minute Men" have been placed in the "Paul Revere School" in Boston. 
A brass plate on the school-room door bears the inscription, "To pro- 
mote liberty and loyalty." 

In 1907 a painting of James Otis was executed for the Society, and is 
now on exhibition in the "Old State House," Boston. 

The Society has given copies of its publications to the public libraries 
and educational institutions of the State, and has also distributed copies 
of the "National Register" of the Society to these institutions. 

During the War with Spain the Society contributed one hundred dol- 
lars for a Hospital ship, also two hundred dollars to the sufferers from 
the fire in San Francisco and in Chelsea, Mass. 

The Society has been represented at many public hearings for the 
preservation of historic sites and ancient customs and observances of 
Revolutionary events and dates. It has also urged on the town authori- 
ties of Massachusetts the marking of the graves of the soldiers of the 
Revolution. 

The Massachusetts Society entertained the annual Congress of the 
National Society in 1895 and again in 1906. 

The membership of the State Society numbers one thousand six 
hundred and thirty-five. The Society has permanent quarters on the 
site of Benjamin Franklin's Birthplace in Boston. Here they have a 
library of two hundred and twenty-five volumes, and sets of historical 
magazines and many pamphlets. The walls are also made attractive 
with portraits of its past and present officers, historical engravings, and 
documents. 



,- 



lOO SONS 01' Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

This account of the Society does not include the work of its Chapters 
or individual members, which can only be lightly touched upon in the 
limited space allotted. 

George Washington Chapter, of Springfield, has placed markers on 
fifty graves. It has also erected a boulder and tablet on West Spring- 
field Common to mark Burgoyne's encampment. Another boulder and 
tablet was placed to commemorate an event in Shay's Rebellion. The 
annual meeting and banquet is on Washington's Birthday, while other 
meetings have been held at which addresses have been given. The mem- 
bership is one hundred and twenty-five. 

Old Middlesex Chapter, of Lowell, was chartered January 17, 1896. It 
has a membership of seventy-one, and has met on historic dates, at 
which time especially prepared papers have been read on subjects per- 
taining to the Revolution or ancestry of the members. In 1899, with the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, they placed a boulder and tablet 
at Chelmsford, Mass., to commemorate the "Minute Men" of that town. 
In 1904 they placed a boulder and tablet to the memory of the Revolu- 
tionary soldiers of that town. 

Old Essex Chapter, of Lynn, was chartered February 7, 1896, and has 
a membership of one hundred and twenty-five. These members have 
marked the graves of two hundred and seventeen Revolutionary soldiers 
in their locality, with appropriate ceremonies, and participated in by the 
local authorities and many citizens. An annual meeting is held on April 
iS, while yearly meetings are held on Yorktown Day, and an outing in 
midsummer is enjoyed. Other special meetings are held for the presen- 
tation of papers on historical subjects, and also for social enjoyment. 
The Chapter will issue in the near future a book on the membership of 
the Chapter, and on matters of local historical interest. 

Old Suffolk Chapter, Chelsea, was chartered February 3, 1897, and has 
a membership of seventy. The annual meeting is held on May 27, the 
day in 1775 on which was fought the "Battle of Chelsea Creek." On 
this date yearly the Chapter has its "Ladies' Night," and elects its offi- 
cers. From September to May, monthly, each year the members have 
met socially at the residence of one of their number, and listened to an 
essay on some historical subject or of present-day interest. Occasionally 
the program is varied by a "Smoker'' in some public hall, with a 
neighboring Chapter as guests, winding up with a light collation. This 
plan was not interrupted the past year, though many members lost their 
home and all their worldly goods in the Chelsea lire of 1908, the com- 
patriots of the Chapter resilient in Revere and Winthrop, parts of the 
old town of Chelsea, entertaining their less fortunate compatriots. The 
Chapter has placed markers on the graves of the soldiers buried in the 
oldest graveyard at Revere. There has also been erected, through the 
worlc of the Chapter members, a tablet on the Prattville School-house, 
the site of barracks during the siege of Boston. Also a tablet at the 
entrance of the Naval Hospital grounds, which mark's the nearby site of 
Moses Maverick's fortified house of 1625 and the first ferry of 1631. On 
the Revere Boulevard they have placed a stone and I ablet; to commemor- 
ate the fight of May 27, 1775, on the creeks which How nearby. All 
these facts, with a detailed account of the battle, were published, with 
other historical matter and illustrations, by- the Chapter in a handsome 
volume in 1900. 

Maiden Chapter was chartered April 6, 1900, and now has fifty-five 
members. The members meet monthly during the winter at the home 
of some member, and listen to a paper on some historical subject, and 
enjoy a social hour. Once a year a public meeting, ladies' night or 
"smoke talk'" is indulged in by the members and their friends. On Bell 
Rock, the site of the first Meeting House, a boulder has been placed, 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS IOI 



bearing a bronze tablet with the two hundred and twenty-five names of 
the soldiers of the Revolution enlisting from Maiden. Markers have 
also been placed in the local burial ground on the graves of some of 
these soldiers. 

Boston Chapter, chartered October 31, 1895. meets monthly during the 
winter, when, after a silent toast to their ancestry and the transaction 
of business an essay is read on some historical topic. A banquet is held 
yearly on Evacuation Day, March 17, the date of the termination of the 
siege of Boston in 1776. 

Seth Pomeroy Chapter, of Northampton, was organized November 2, 
1905, and now has a membership of fifty. The Chapter is now engaged 
in marking about one hundred and twenty graves of Revolutionary 
soldiers in the vicinity. A picture of Governor Caleb Strong was pre- 
sented in 1906 to the Northampton High School. Two prizes of five 
dollars each were offered to two pupils, one of foreign and the otber of 
native parentage, for the best essay on the subject, ''Why Do I Love 
America, My Country?" Exercises have been held on different dates 
in honor of General Seth Pomeroy and otber local celebrities of the 
Revolution. Five hundred leaflets of "Information to Immigrants" have 
been distributed. A collection of over one hundred manuscript docu- 
ments from a descendant of Governor Strong, as a gift, is owned by the 
Chapter. 

Robert Treat Paine Chapter, of Taunton, was chartered September II, 
1897, and now has a membership of thirty. On the date of the annual 
meeting the Chapter holds a banquet. Other meetings and "smoke talks" 
have also been held, at which patriotic addresses have been delivered 
by the members. Bronze tablets have been placed on the graves of 
General David Cobb and Tames Williams and Brigade-Major William 
Seavcr. The Chapter also assisted in erecting the boulder and tablet on 
Taunton Green to commemorate the unfurling of the "Taunton Flag" in 
1774. 

Roxbury Chapter was chartered on March 24, 1906, and now has a 
membership of twenty. This chapter holds meetings at which papers of 
interest are read. The Chapter subscribed eighty dollars to the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay Cloister at Valley Forge Chapel, and obtained from the 
members of the State Society sufficient subscriptions to ensure its erec- 
tion in the near future. 

Other Chapters of the State Society are : "Old Colony," at Whitman, 
in Plymouth County; "Worcester," in the heart of the Commonwealth; 
""Newtowne," in Newton; "Berkshire County," at Pittslield, and "Cam- 
bridge," in the University City. 

The Michigan Society was organized January 18, 1890, at Detroit. 
Its present membership is three hundred and seventy-five. The officers 
of the State Society are resident in Detroit, and a Chapter has been 
formed in Grand Rapids. The annual meeting is on Lexington Day, 
and Washington's Birthday is usually celebrated by a banquet. Other 
events that have been observed by the Society were the centennial in 
1896 of the evacuation of Detroit by the British, and in 1901 the bi- 
centenary of the founding of Detroit. 

Four series of meetings have been held in Detroit, at which historical 
papers have been delivered. These were inaugurated by the late Dr. 
Rufus W. Clark, a President of the Society. In 1898 there was issued 
a handsome volume, covering the period from 1800 to 1898. Smaller 
pamphlets have been issued since then containing lists of members and 
other information. The Society has a library of two hundred volumes 
and two hundred pamphlets. The Tenth Annual Congress met at 
Detroit May 1 and 2, 1899. 



102 SONS 01' TILI; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

The Minnesota Society was organized in St. Paul December 26, 
1889, and this date has been selected for the annual meeting and ban- 
quet. This observance commemorates the Battle of Trenton. Wash- 
ington's Birthday is also celebrated by a banquet or religious exercises, 
and these occasions are of more than usual interest from the presence 
of a large chorus of school children. 

Bunker Hill Day has also been the date for annual banquets, with 
patriotic addresses by eminent speakers. In 1895 a handsome volume of 
over live hundred pages was published, giving the history of the Society 
to that date, with an account of the membership and sketches of the 
Revolutionary ancestry. Addresses delivered on various occasions 
with historical memoranda were also included. The Society has now 
a membership of about four hundred. 

The Missouri Society was organized April 23, 1889, in St. Louis, 
and at the present time the members in that city are organized as a 
Chapter, while a Chapter has also been formed in Kansas City. The 
annual meeting of the State Society is on March 4, to commemorate 
the taking effect of the Constitution of the United States. The annual 
dinner is on Lexington Day. The rolls of membership show a total 
of one hundred and twelve names at the present time. The Annual 
Congress of the National Society in 1904 was held in St. Louis. 

The Montana Society was organized at Helena June 5, 1894. The 
annual meeting is on Washington's Birthday, on which occasion, as well 
as on Bunker Hill Day, there have been social meetings. The member- 
ship is about forty in number. The Society has secured State laws 
against the desecration of the Flag and for "unfurling of the Flag on 
the State Capitol." 

The Nebraska Society was organized April 26, 1890. The annual 
meeting is held on Washington's Birthday. The Society is doing good 
work among the schools of the State by the presentation of a patriotic 
address by one of their number, or one prepared for the purpose, to 
be delivered on Lexington Day. Prizes are also offered for the best 
essay on "Why Did the American Revolution Succeed?" to be com- 
peted for by pupils in the high schools of Omaha and Lincoln. The 
present membership is about one hundred and thirteen. A section in 
the Omaha Public Library is reserved for the literature collected by the 
Society, and amounts to thirty volumes. 

The New Hampshire Society was organized April 24, 1889, at Con- 
cord, N. H. In 1S90 the Society secured the erection by the State of 
a statue, costing eight thousand dollars, of General John Stark, in the 
vState House Park at Concord. ]\\ 1804 Miss Annie M. Phelps, of 
Brookline, Mass., presented to the Society a granite tablet bearing the 
names of the Revolutionary soldiers of East Concord, N: PL, which 
was placed in "Old Fort Cemetery." 

In 1903 the Society gave three hundred dollars, which, added to five 
hundred dollars from the State, erected a monument to General Enoch 
Poor at Hackensack, N. J. 

In 1805 the Society scoured the passage of a State law forbidding 
the display of foreign Hags on public buildings. In 1890 a State law 
was passed forbidding the desecration of the National or State flags. 
The Society has placed about seventy-five of the regular markers of the 
Society on the graves of soldiers of the Revolution. 

The Society published in 1890 its membership roll, and in 1894, 1896, 
and 189S Year Books. The proceedings of the Society from 1898 to 
1903 have been published, and these include addresses and data relating 
to the Revolution of great value. 

The membership at present is over three hundred, and on the rolls 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



103 



may be found the names of six governors, and others of high rank in 
the army, official, and professional life. 

The New Jersey Society was organized March 7, 1889. The annual 
meetings were first held on December 26, the anniversary of the Battle 
of Trenton, but are now held on January 3, the date of the Battle 
of Princeton. The Society has erected several substantial monuments. 
One is in a graveyard of the Presbyterian Church near the battlefield 
of Springfield to a soldier killed in that fight. One also near the same 
locality, at Summit, where a beacon and signal gun were used in the 
Revolution. A memorial tablet marking the site of Monmouth Court 
House was unveiled July 4, 1907. A sum is yearly appropriated for 
monuments to Revolutionary soldiers buried in the State. A monu- 
ment at Greenwich has been erected to "The Jersey Tea Burners," and 
a monument marking the battlefield of Princeton is in process of erec- 
tion. The Society has also subscribed five hundred dollars to the 
Trenton Battle Monument. 

The membership now numbers three hundred and eighty-three, with 
Chapters located at Elizabethtown and Orange. The Orange Chapter 
was quite active in the Orange celebration on June 14, 1907, and from 
the proceeds of their "Colonial Ball," given February 22, 190S, have 
contributed to a proposed monument to Abraham Lincoln. 

Handsomely bound volumes have been published, giving the members 
and their ancestry, in 1889 and 1905, a history of the Society in 1893, 
and "Patriotic Poems of New Jersey in the Revolution," annotated by 
William Clinton Armstrong, issued in 1906. 

Bulletins are now issued annually of the annual meeting. The So- 
ciety has a collection of one hundred volumes and twenty-four pamph- 
lets. The New Jersey Society entertained the Annual Congress of the 
National Society at Morristown in 1898. 

The Empire State Society of the Slate of New York was organized 
February 11, 1800, as the New York State Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, and became incorporated April 8, 1895, as the 
Empire State Society, S. A. R. The present membership is one thou- 
eighteen. Stony Point, New York, has been 
I: through the efforts of the Society, and they 
preservation of many historic mansions and 
>ersliip of national reputation are the names 



sand four hundred am 
[ireserved as a State p; 
have been active in lb 
sites. Among the mei 



Se 



cretary 



of former President Roosevelt, Governor Hughes, 
Root, and the late Genera] Thomas Ewing. 

In 1894 there was erected under the auspices of the Society a granite 
monument at Dobb's Ferry to Washington and Rochambeau. In 1901 
a marble monument was erected on the site of Fort Washington, now 
included in Greater New York. The Society contributed nearly two 
thousand dollars to the monument in memory of the "Prison Ship 
Martyrs" at Brooklyn. Several bronze markers have been placed on 
graves. Oyer two hundred portraits of Washington have been placed 
in the public schools, and addresses delivered on the occasion. A bust 
of Washington was also placed in a public school at Newburgh. Money 
prizes have also been given for historical essays. The Society now 
issues a bulletin of future meetings and proceedings of past meetings. 
Many addresses and sermons delivered before the Society have been 
put into prim. In the established headquarters of the Society in New 
York city there is a library of five hundred volumes and two hundred 
pamphlets. 

There arc a dozen Chapters scattered through the State. Of these 
Chapters, special mention should be made of Buffalo Chapter, char- 
tered May 29, 1893. This Chapter royally entertained the Congress of 
the National Society in [908. The Annual Congress of the National 
Society was held in New York city in 1892 and again in 1900. 









" 


















104 SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Gansevoort-Willett Chapter, of Rome, chartered April 30, 1896, has 
placed tablets on the site of Fort Stanwix. Syracuse Chapter, chartered 
October 15, 1806, has been active in having a tablet placed on the 
Federal building in Syracuse to the memory of the Onondaga County 
men in the Revolutionary War. Chapters are also located at Yonkers, 
Newburgh, Elmira, Johnstown, Herkimer, Fort Edward, Rochester, 
Binghamton, and Saratoga Springs. 

TliE New Mexico Society was organized at Albuquerque on Decem- 
ber 26, 1908, with twenty-one charter members, under the direction of 
Doctor Guyer and Air. Joseph F. Tuttle, Jr., of Denver. 

The Ohio Society was organized April 22, 1800, as the "Sons of the 
Revolution," but soon joined the National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. The annual meeting is on Lexington Day. The 
Society has placed nine hundred bronze markers on the graves of 
soldiers of the Revolution. Seventy-three patriotic addresses have been 
delivered by the Society and its members. Tracts and leaflets on good 
citizenship, etc., have been distributed to arriving immigrants. A 
manual of membership has been issued annually, and Year Rooks every 
two years. A large collection of manuscript addresses delivered under 
the auspices of the Society has been made. A library of three hundred 
volumes and four hundred pamphlets lias been collected. The member- 
ship is live hundred and twenty-two, and Chapters are located in Cleve- 
land, Toledo, Youngstown, Newark, Kenton, Cincinnati, and Xenia. 

The Eighth Annual Congress of the National Society was held at 
Cleveland in 1S97. 

The Oklahoma Society was organized February 22, 1905, a date 
annually observed, and now has a membership of thirty-five, all repre- 
sentative men of the State. A gold medal has been offered to the stu- 
dent who shall furnish the best essay on a patriotic subject selected 
by the Society. The occasion will also be made a public affair on its 
presentation to the successful scholar. 

Tile Oregon Society (at first called the Oregon and Washington 
Society), which included those members who later formed the Wash- 
ington Society, was organized June 6, 1891. The present membership 
is one hundred and twenty-eight. The Society has been very active 
in patriotic work. Fifty dollars has been expended yearly for eleven 
years in prizes to school" children for essays on subjects connected with 
the Revolution. For several years the S-ociety has furnished speakers 
who have spoken in the public schools on Washington's Birthday. The 
annual meeting is also held on that date and a banquet enjoyed by the 
members and guests. Books, mostly historical literature, have also been 
given as prizes for essays. 

The dates of the surrender at Yorktown and Saratoga and the Battle 
of Cowpens have been observed by patriotic meetings. The "Winter 
at Valley Forge," the battles of "Lexington," "Bunker Hill," and 
"King's Mountain" have been observed by "smokers" on their suc- 
cessive dates. In 1S07 a banquet, held jointly with the Daughters of 
the Revolution, celebrated the "Boston Tea Party," while a banquet on 
January 17, 1906, celebrated the two hundredth anniversary of Frank- 
lin's birth. 

Publications were issued in 1892, 1895, and 1903, which contained, 
besides the record of membership and ancestry, the addresses delivered 
at various meetings, notably "The Jews in the American Revolution," 
by Benjanim I. Cohen, and "King's Mountain Campaign," by Robert T. 
Bell. The Society has a library of about two hundred and forty 
volumes. 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS 105 

Tin* Pennsylvania SOCIETY was organized at Pittsburgh November 
23, 1803, and {lie majority of the membership is in Pittsburgh and that 
part of the State. Chapters have been formed, however, in Philadel- 
phia, Erie, and New Castle, and the membership now exeeeds live 
hundred. 

Through the efforts of the Society the remains of several Revolution- 
ary worthies were reinterred in Allegheny, and trophies of the war, in 
the shape of French and English bronze guns, were conspicuously 
placed in Pittsburgh. Money was also appropriated for restoring the 
monument of John Morton, a Signer of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, which is located at Chester, Pennsylvania. 

The Philadelphia Chapter has also been active in locating and mark- 
ing the graves of the Signers. 

The annual meeting of the State Society is held at Pittsburgh on 
Washington's Birthday, at which time banquets have been held and 
patriotic addresses delivered. 

The banquet February 22, J909, at the Union Club, Pittsburgh, had 
as an interesting souvenir a handsome little publication on the Flags, 
in colors. Flag Day is also observed with patriotic addresses. The 
sum of two hundred and fifty dollars was appropriated toward the 
Memorial Hall of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Wash- 
ington. A number of the members served in the War with Spain and 
received the Society's medal for their service. 

Flags have also been given for use in Schenley Park, Pittsburgh, 
and graves of Revolutionary soldiers have had bronze markers placed 
on them. 

Some of the proceedings of the Society and biographies of deceased 
members have been printed. The Twelfth Annual Congress was held 
at Pittsburgh in 10,01. 

The Rhode Island Society was organized February 1, 1890, at 
Providence. The annual meeting is on Washington's Birthday, which 
is also the occasion of the annual banquet. 

On Memorial Day, yearly, exercises are held at the monument to 
Admiral Esek Hopkins, which are also participated in by the pupils of a 
neighboring school. Excursions have been enjoyed to Bristol, Lexing- 
ton, Concord, and the "Battlefield of Rhode Island," and other places. 

A tablet has been placed on University Hall, Providence, telling of 
its occupation by our French Allies in the War of the Revolution, 
One on the Board of Trade Building marks the place where "British 
Taxed Tea" was burned in [775. A granite shaft marks the encamp- 
ment of the Allies under Rochambeau. Two hundred and seventy-three 
of the Society's markers have been placed on the graves of soldiers 
of the Revolution. 

In 1806 portraits of Washington were presented to all the high 
schools in the State. In 1902 a flag and staff were presented to the 
Rhode Island Historical Society, and in 1808 a sword was given Colonel 
Charles \Y. Abbot, Jr., of the First Rhode Island Regiment in the 
Spanish War. 

A fund is now accumulating, by a yearly appropriation of one hun- 
dred dollars, to erect with other patriotic bodies a monument to General 
Nathanael Greene. 

The membership is about three hundred, and Chapters exist in Bristol 
and Providence. 

Manuals have been published for 1892 and 1900, and some memorials 
of deceased members printed. 

The books and pamphlets belonging to the Society are deposited with 
the Rhode Island Historical Society. 



io6 



SONS OF 'I'll J; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



The South Dakota Society was organized at Deadwood April 24, 
1899, and has had a membership of twenty or more. The annual meet- 
ing is held on Washington's Birthday. 

The Tennessee Society was organized December 2, 1SS9, at Nash- 
ville. The Society was not active until reorganized April 21, 1899. It 
now has a membership of one hundred and ten. The date for the 
annual meeting is October 7, to commemorate the "Battle of King's 
Mountain," and a banquet is also enjoyed. 

March 12, the date of the "Battle of Guilford Court House," is also 
celebrated by a banquet. A large number of the membership derive 
their eligibility from ancestors who participated in those contests and 
the "Battle of Cowpens." 

The Texas Society was organized December 8, 1896, at Galveston, 
where a large part of its membership reside, and at the present time 
the total number is eighty-six. The annual meeting is held on Wash- 
ington's Birthday. 

Through the generosity of its former President, Ron. Ira II. Evans, 
the National Society's Register of 1902 was placed in all the public 
libraries of Texas. 

Tin-; Utah Society was organized January 29, 1895, and now has 
about seventy members, mostly resident in Salt Lake City. The annual 
meeting is held on Washington's Birthday in that city. 

The Society has given a medal which is competed for by the scholars 
in the High School of Salt Lake City. 

The Vermont Society was organized April 2, 1889, at Montpelier, 
where alternate annual meetings have been held on the second Wednes- 
day in November. Banquets and notable anniversaries have been held. 
At Montpelier, in T902, the meeting was addressed by former President 
Theodore Roosevelt; and in 1905, at the dedication of the Ethan Allen 
Tower, erected by the Society, the address was by former Vice-President 
Charles W. Fairbanks. 

The locations of the graves of many of the six thousand Revolu- 
tionary soldiers buried in Vermont have been found through the efforts 
of the Society. 

Membership lists of the Society were issued in 190T, 1904, and 1908, 
and the Secretary, Mr. Walter II. Crockett, at the suggestion of the 
Society, has undertaken the preparation of a volume on Vermont's part 
in the Revolutionary War. The total membership, two hundred and 
seventy-five, includes, among other prominent names, those of Admiral 
Dewey and General O. O. Howard, Senators Proctor. Dillingham, 
Stewart, and Page, and Dr. W. Seward W'ebb, founder of the Vermont' 
Society. 

Copies of the National Register of the S. A. R. for 1901 have been 
supplied to each Public Library in the State. 

The Virginia Society was organized July t, 1890, at Richmond. The 
annual meeting is held on Washington's Birthday, and is followed by a 
banquet, with patriotic addresses. 

It has a membership of seventy-four .and a Chapter located at Nor- 
folk, the officers of the State Society residing at Richmond. 

In 1896 the Eighth Annual Congress was held at Richmond. 

The Washington Society was organized June 17, 1895. The Oregon 
and Washington Society, formed at Portland, Oregon, June 6, 189 1, 
included members living in Washington. A Chapter was organized in 
Spokane, Wash., February 1, 1S94, and later Chapters were formed in 
Seattle and Tacoma, and the Washington Society was completed June 
17, 1S95. The annual meeting is on Washington's Birthday. A banquet 



PROCEEDINGS OI< BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



107 



!> also enjoyed on that day, which is graced on alternate years by the 
presence of the ladies. On the same date for several years, in Seattle,. 
Spokane, and Tacoma, prizes of twenty, ten, and five dollars have been 
given to the pupils of the High Schools, for the best orations on patriotic 
subjects. 

Five hundred dollars has been contributed towards the erection of a 
statue of George Washington on the campus of the University of Wash- 
ington at Seattle. The present membership exceeds two hundred. 

The Society now has a library of over one hundred volumes. The 
Society will observe June 14 as "Sons of the American Revolution Day," 
at the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition, and will place on the grounds a 
flagstaff two hundred feet high. 

The Wisconsin Society was organized February 25, 1890, at Mil- 
waukee, where the headquarters were established. The Society is locat- 
ing all the graves of Revolutionary soldiers found in the State. It has 
contributed twenty-five dollars towards a bust of George Rogers Clark, 
placed in the Milwaukee Public Library by the "Children of the Ameri- 
can Revolution." 

Prizes of twenty-five dollars each were given in 1896 for the best 
essay on "Causes and Events which led to the War of the American 
Revolution," and in 1S07 on "The Revolutionary War prior to the 
Declaration of Independence." In 189S and 1899 prizes of thirty-five 
dollars each for an essay on "The Declaration of Independence" were 
offered. 

The Educational Committee of the Society is engaged in distributing 
the leaflets of the National Society. 

Meetings have also been held, in connection with the Society of 
Colonial Wars, for the discussion of the best modes of promoting 
patriotism among prospective citizens. 

At a cost of eleven hundred dollars the Society has published two 
volumes; in 1905 "Dunmore's War," and in 1908 "Revolution on the 
Upper Ohio," compiled from the Draper MSS. in the library of the State 
Historical Society of Wisconsin. 

The present membership of the Society is two hundred and seven. 

The Wyoming Society was organized at Cheyenne, March 28, 1908,. 
and admitted to the National Society at the Congress in Buffalo on 
April 30, 1908. Most of the twenty-three members reside in Cheyenne,, 
and their formation as a State Society is the result of the labors of Dr. 
Guvcr and his associates in Colorado. 



The PRESIDENT GENERAE: Next in order are the reports of the Stand- 
ing Committees. The first of these committees to be called upon for a 
report would ordinarily be the Committee on Auditing and Finance. 
Their report appeared, however, as attached to the report of the Treas- 
urer General, and unless the chairman, Mr. De Caindry, has something 
further to state than appears in the endorsement on the report of the 
Treasurer General, that will be passed at this time. 

Mr. De Caindry: The Auditing Committee has nothing further to 
report. 

The PRESIDENT GENERAE: The report as attached to the report of the 
Treasurer General will be taken as the report of that committee. The 
next report is that of the Memorial Committee, George R. Howe, of 
New Jersey, chairman. 

Mr. Howe: Mr. President General, on behalf of the Committee, I 



ioS 



SONS OF Till', AMERICAN kl'.YOlJJTlON 



will only lake a moment to say that monuments are being steadily and 
consistently erected by all the Societies of the original thirteen colonies 
wherever Revolutionary history has made a spot memorable, and the 
great monument in New York vState to the prison-ship martyrs, already 
referred to, yon are familiar with. It is a great pleasure that this 
question of marking historic accomplishments, that should be marked 
and suitably marked, is being taken up by all the Societies, and reports 
from time to time in the BUEEETIN will give full information to the 
members. 

The President Generae: Without objection the report will be re- 
ceived and filed. It is so ordered. 

The next report is from the Committee on Organization in the North 
and West, Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, chairman. 

Dr. Cearkson N. Guyer: Mr. President General: As Chairman of 
the Committee on Organization, having in charge the work in the North 
and West, I have not much to say. When you came out to Colorado 
and held your convention there you rekindled that light in our hearts 
and minds that burned in the minds and hearts of our forefathers. 
That has continued to glow, and no matter whether we have storms 
outside or not, that light is so bright that it makes it pleasant wherever 
you go. Were I this morning to give in detail a report of the work 
of the Committee on Organization I am sure that you would need some 
of that liquid that a lady suggested to the Governor of our State to 
drink at a banquet table. She was the Governor's company, and as she 
sat by his side they came down to the coffee. He said to her, "If I 
drink this coffee it will keep me awake all night." And she turned to 
him and said, "But Governor, you know I have to drink this coffee, 
because in a few minutes I have to listen to you talk." (Applause.) So 
I am afraid that if I were to go into detail this morning in regard to 
our work that you would need some of that liquid to keep you awake. 
I have sent a report to our Secretary General and it will be printed in 
the Year Book, and I know that will be more pleasing than for me to 
take the time to read it now. I thank you. (Applause.) 

REPORT OP THE ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE FOR THE 
NORTH AND WEST. 



Dr. Cearkson N. Guyer, Chairman, Denver, Colo. 
Frank Mijrria.m Keexer, Secretary, Denver, Colo. 
Peeiiam W. Ames, of California. 
Frank B. Steeee, Buffalo, N. Y. 
George E. Maxweee, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Henry B. Patten, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Waldo Pettenciee, Rumford Falls, Me. 

South Dakota. — I have the honor to report, as Chairman of the 
Committee on Organization for the North and West, thai as soon as 
practicable after receiving said appointment, I went to South Dakota 
and had published in the public prints a general circular setting forth 






PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS IOQ 

the objects and aims of our Society. I do no injustice to any com- 
patriot of the South Dakota Society in speaking of the present organi- 
zation in South Dakota as "inactive." In all the correspondence with 
the President and others of that Society there has been manifested a 
willingness to do what was for the general good of the Society. The 
headquarters of the old Society were at Deadwood, in the. extreme 
western part of the State. After much correspondence with members 
and eligiblcs, I discovered an evident inclination towards headquarters 
for the future at Sioux Falls, in the eastern part. About 20 or 25 
eligibles are reported there at this writing, and it is only a matter of a 
little time, in my opinion, when we shall have a thriving Chapter in 
South Dakota. It was the work of months in correspondence to push 
this up to its present status, and I believe we shall shortly have in that 
State an effective organization. 

North Dakota has not been neglected, and I have followed up 
several lines with voluminous correspondence. This State, like its 
sister State, is a State of "magnificent distances." Under date of April 
3d, I received the following letter from Compatriot Abel, of that State, 
showing that the leaven is still working: 

"I have not abandoned efforts towards getting the eligiblcs in line in 
this vicinity, in view of the organization of a Society in this. State. 
Having been transferred to Montana for a time last year, I was obliged 
to suspend operations until the fall, but since my return I have not- 
been able to get many definite returns. All applications need to be sent 
away to distant parts for any information, and returns have been 
extremely slow." 

New Mexico. — After a correspondence of six or eight months, the 
favorable moment for perfecting the organization of our Society in New 
Mexico came on Christmas Day, 1908. On that day, with Joseph F. 
Tuttle, Jr., I went to Albuquerque, and on the following day formally 
organized the Society there. A large number of eligiblcs met us in a 
business meeting that afternoon in Elks' Hall, where the utmost har- 
mony prevailed. The situation was gone over very carefully and officers 
were elected. That evening, at the Alvarado Hotel, a large number of 
the New Mexico gentlemen gathered at the banquet, where it was my 
great pleasure to formally present them with their charter. Patriotic 
speeches were made by the committee, as well as by the local gentlemen. 
One of the speakers alluded to the happy significance of their organi- 
zation on December 26th as their natal day, and hoped that the New 
Mexico flag would be kept as Paul Jones on December 26, 1770, kept 
his flag in the presence of his enemies in the 7V.iv/ — Hying. Nothing 
could be finer than the spirit of these gentlemen toward the Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution. 

Idaho. — It was the great fortune of our committee to get in touch 
with Lieut. -Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. Army, a fellow compatriot of the 
Maine Society, S. A. R. When informed of our very great desire to 
perfect an organization in Idaho, he did us yeoman service, and sent 
word that we could come to Boise City about the first week of April. 
Messrs. Keezer and Tuttle accompanied me. We arrived there April 
8th and spent the entire day in meeting the gentlemen who were to 
compose the new Society, and in carefully arranging some details of 
business which were necessarily awaiting the arrival of the Committee. 
That evening an elaborate banquet was tendered the Committee at the 
Commercial Club, at which Mr. Keezer and Mr. Tuttle spoke, followed 
by your Chairman with the presentation of their charter and the formal 
greetings of the National Society. The occasion was graced with the 
presence of a large number of the Daughters of the American Rcvolu- 



no sons of the; American revolution 

tion and their eligiblcs who arc about joining the Society, with many 
distinguished citizens of Idaho, like Governor Morrison, Judge Morgan, 
Colonel Wood, George Wyman, and many others. Mention was fre- 
quently made during the evening of the great obligation the people felt 
to our National Society in establishing a Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution in Idaho. The next evening, at the Congrega- 
tional Church, Mr. Tuttle delivered a lecture in the interest of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. 

In this connection, I would say that I would have been only too glad 
to have visited some of the State Societies in the West, but the trails 
are long from place to place out here. As it is, the fruit of the work 
of the Committee, whose chairman J have the honor to be, is the organi- 
zations of the Wyoming, the New Mexico, and Idaho State Societies. 

Permit me, in closing, to say to the Secretaries of our State Societies 
that I greatly appreciated their response to my little card of January 
1st — a New Year greeting it was designed to be — in which I asked them 
for any suggestions as to building up our membership. Their replies 
were very helpful. 
■ 

The President .General: Without objection the report of Dr. Guyer 
will be entered in the minutes of this Congress. The Committee on 
Education will next report. Col. Charles Lyman, of the District of 
Columbia Society, Chairman. 

Colonel L/VTMAN : Mr. President General, Compatriots: I may say 
some things in this report which have already been said in the other 
reports, and will be said in the reports yet to be made. But the me- 
morial work and the educational work are so intertwined that it is 
hardly possible to separate them absolutely so that they will not cross 
lines. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 

Col. Ciiaki.es Lyman, Chairman, Treas. Dept., Washington, D. C. 

Proe. William K. WiCKES, Syracuse, N. Y. 

William J. Dutton, 401 California St., San Francisco, Cal. ' 

Hon. GEORGE D. Todd, Louisville, Kentucky. 

J. Franklin Pierce, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dr. Charles W. Nijediiam, Washington, D. C. 

To the Baltimore Congress, April 50, K)0<): 

Since the lamented death of the Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D., Chair- 
man of the Committee on Education, and my succession, by appointment 
of the President General, to that position, there has been scant time for 
the gathering of the necessary data for a satisfactory report to this Con- 
gress. I had hoped that the Committee would profit much by material 
which it was supposed had been left by Dr. Clark, and which would be 
available to it, but inquiry of Mrs. Clark and others likely to know of 
such material failed to produce anything of value. It has therefore been 
necessary to depend in the preparation of this report upon such data as 
could be gathered on short notice. 

Tt has been gratifying to find that a few of the State Societies and 
some local Chapters have been commendably active in educational work, 
but discouraging to note that a majority of the Societies and Chapters 
have done nothing or next to nothing during the last year in this line. 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BALTIMORE CONGRTCSS 



III 



There is work to be done, work of the utmost importance, which this 
Society can and ought to do and will do if it is imbued with the right 
spirit. 

It has been and will continue to be the purpose of this committee, if 
it shall be continued, by suggestion through correspondence and in other 
ways to encourage State Societies and local Chapters to engage in lines 
of educational work most needed in their several communities, and 
which they are best aide to undertake. 

A brief synopsis is here presented of the educational work carried on 
during the year by the State Societies which report any activity at all 
in that line : 

Arizona. — Distributed the leaflet "Information for Immigrants" to 
miners of foreign birth. 

Connecticut. — The principal work of the year has been to place 
markers at the graves of Revolutionary soldiers and sailors, and to 
place a monument at Compo Beach, where General Tryon landed in his 
raid on Danbury. 

Illinois. — Educational work this year has been mostly confined to the 
distribution of about 115,000 of the Immigration leaflet. There have 
"been placed in some of the schools, where the pupils are largely foreign, 
statuetes of Gen. Roger Clark and "The Minute Man." 

Iowa. — Has competition going on in about 25 colleges, universities and 
high schools for a medal to be awarded each school for the best work 
in the study of the history of the United States. Last year 12 bronze 
medals were awarded on the same conditions to students in as many 
colleges and higher institutions. The effort is to educate in the line of 
patriotism. 

MASSACHUSETTS. — Society has used its influence with success to pre- 
vent changing the names of historic places, for instance from "Maverick 
Square" to "Dohorty Square." The Society has also brought to the 
notice of several towns the importance of marking the graves of pa- 
triots of the Revolutionary War. 

MICHIGAN. — The Society has maintained monthly meetings at which 
historical papers have been read on such subjects as the following: The 
Continental Congress — its authority and influence: "Patrick Henry, 
not a Virginian, but an American;" "La Fayette," "John Hancock," 
"Benjamin Franklin," "Our duties to recent Territorial acquisitions," 
"Centralization of Government," "Amalgamation of Immigrants into 
American Citizens." 

Nebraska. — Leaflets on immigration in seven languages have been 
placed in the night schools of Omaha, which the teachers have used with 
satisfactory results. 

Two years ago the Society inaugurated a scries of contests in the 
high schools of the State. Last year contests were between the schools 
in Omaha and Lincoln. The contests this year brought out 205 essays 
on the subject "Why Did the American Revolution Succeed?" The 
prize is awarded to the school and not to the pupil, but on each prize is 
placed a plate giving the name of the Society, the year, the winner, and 
whether first or second prize. 

On April 19, S. A. R. Day, members go to the schools and make 
patriotic addresses to the pupils. An address on "The Battle of Lexing- 
ton and its Lessons" has been prepared to be read by the teacher in the 
schools where there is no member of the Society to make an address. 

The Society is arranging a series of meetings with the members of 
•different foreign societies to have one of their number make a speech 



112 



SUNS OF T111C AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



on sonic phase or question of a foreign-born citizen's duty to the United 

States. The Society will edit the speech and the meeting will be under 
the Society's management and patronage. 

New York — Empire STATE. — Little work except to place "Immigra- 
tion" leaflets in the hands of incoming immigrants. 

Ohio. — During the year the Society as a central body and through 
local Chapters has prosecuted educational work along three lines, viz: 

i. Distribution of leaflets containing primary information concerning 
our political institutions, expressed in simplest form, and it has been 
found that old and young readily grasp the general idea of personal 
liberty regulated by reasonable law upon which the government was 
founded. This line of instruction has yielded good results. 

2. The assignment of members of the Society to address the schools,, 
particularly those largely attended by foreigners, selecting for such oral 
exemplification the history and institutions of the Republic, National 
and legal holidays, etc. School authorities gladly cooperate with the 
Sons of the American Revolution and other patriotic societies in this 
line of work - . 

The records of the courts show a lower per cent of criminality in 
Ohio in proportion to the foreign population than in almost any other 
State, and it is claimed that the work of our Society has helped to 
produce this result. 

Pennsylvania. — February 22 and Flag Day are regularly observed 
by the Society by patriotic exercises. Action taken to restore grave oi 
John Morton at Chester, Pa., a signer oi the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. Bronze markers have been placed on about 12 graves of Revolu- 
tionary soldiers. Action has been taken by the Philadelphia Chapter to 
locate the graves of signers, and mark them when possible. Effort is 
also being made to locate the burial places of all Revolutionary soldiers 
whose graves are in Pennsylvania, and to mark them as rapidly as pos- 
sible. Immigration leaflets are being distributed in large numbers 
among the foreign population of Western Pennsylvania through their 
own societies. 

Rhode Island. — On "Memorial Day" the Society, with school chil- 
dren, decorated the grave of Commodore Esek Hopkins, and has sent 
out a printed chart showing all the fortifications in the State. 

Utah. — Has an annual contest at Salt Lake City high school on Feb- 
ruary 22d for Society's medal for oratory on a patriotic subject. 

i/es annually in each of the following, 
and Seattle: subjects on Revolutionary 
if the State Society, the contests being 
.r, and are an event in high-school life. 
So much interest and enthusiam have keen manifested that this year 
prizes have been raised to $30, $20, and $10, respectively. The Society 
is erecting a flag pole on the Alaska -Yukon-Pacific Exposition grounds 
200 feet high, in connection with which appropriate exercises will he 
held on Flag Day, June 14. 

Wisconsin.— Educational work- of the year has consisted in a large 
distribution of the leaflet, "Information for Immigrants;" the discussion 
of the immigrant question at a dinner where views of representative* of 
different nationalities were presented; consultations with leaders of 
principal immigrant groups, and some discussion in the newspapers. 

From these notes it will be seen: 

1. That active and effective educational work' during the year just. 
closed has been carried on by only a few of the Societies; 



Washjn'GTOx\ — (jives three p 
high schools : Spokane, Tacoma 
topics, named by a commission 
held about February 22, each yc 






PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS II3 

2. That much of the work done, such as locating and marking graves, 
erecting monuments, etc., is patriotic in its inception and educational in 
its effects, and should be continued until finished. 

3. That the two lines of work now being prosecuted, which seem to 
your Committee to promise the best results, arc the distribution of the 
leaflets issued by the National Society, and the contests in schools and 
colleges for medals and other prizes. It is suggested, however, that 
these contests should in all cases be conducted in such a manner as to 
attract public attention and excite public interest. This would be ac- 
complished by having the prize essays read and the prizes awarded at 
public meetings, at which there might also be discussion of the essays 
themselves, or of other suitable themes, and newspaper notice. 

Whi'e the reading and discussions of papers' on Revolutionary or 
other patriotic themes at the meetings of Societies and Chapters is im- 
portant and should be encouraged, yet in the judgment of your Com- 
mittee it is not to be compared in value as an educational force and 
influence with work done in the schools and colleges in the various forms 
which such work may suitably take, and with immigrants directly and 
through their own societies and organizations. 

Most of the immigrants of all nationalities that come to this country 
come to stay and to be absorbed into our citizenship; and this fact 
presents many problems for solution, and in the right solution of which 
every native-born citizen is vitally interested. These problems arc 
social, political, economical, moral, and religious, and if our institutions 
are to be preserved and maintained on the lines on which the}' were 
established, and these problems are to be solved so as to secure tins re- 
sult, the performance of no patriotic duty on the part of any citizen can 
safely be omitted. The members of this Society, especially in view of 
their lineage, should feel strongly the call to duty in this matter, and 
that duty is constant and pressing. This Congress, which meets but 
once a year, and the National Society as such, can do little actual 
educational and patriotic work, but its constituent bodies, the State 
Societies and local Chapters can do much, and it is to them that appeal is 
made to do a work in this generation that shall in all respects be worthy 
of comparison with that accomplished by their ancestors. 

The recommendations made by the Committee last year are again 
submitted in substance, as follows: 

1. That the Committee, through its Chairman, be advised by the 
proper officers of State Societies and local Chapters of the activities of 
such Societies and Chapters in the line of educational work, and be 
furnished with any papers and publications which may be useful to the 
Committee in the prosecution of its work. 

2. That the Committee be authorized 1o draw upon the Treasurer for 
incidental expenses ami printing to the amount of $41.00. 

CharUvS Lyman, 

Chairman. 

Moved that the report of the Chairman of the Committee on Educa- 
tion be received with hearty thanks, and that expression be given to the 
Chairman, signifying the appreciation of the Congress for the very 
interesting report he has presented. 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: With the report of the Committee on 
Education closes the reports of the Standing Committees. There are, 
however, several Special Committees from which at this Congress re- 
ports should he received. The first of these is thai known .as the Flag 
Committee, the committee whose special charge it is to take measures 



ii4 soxs of This American revolution 

looking to tlie prevention of acts which tend to desecrate the Flag, o'ur 
National emblem. Unfortunately there is no member of that Committee 
present, but we are exceedingly fortunate in having with us this morn- 
ing a gentleman who is the President of the Sons of the American 
Revolution in the District of Columbia. He is not only that, but he is 
the United States Commissioner of Patents. He is not only that, but he 
is also a man of deep personal patriotic conviction. He is not only that, 
but he is a man who believes in living up to his convictions, and as such 
lias used his position to see that the Flag of the United States was not a 
subject matter which should be appropriated for the trade mark of any 
manufacturer. (Applause.) 1 would call upon Compatriot Edward B. 
Moore, the President of the District of Columbia Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, to make a report on behalf of the Flag 
Committee. (Applause.) 

Mr. E. B. Moors: Mr. President General, Ladies, Delegates of the 
Congress:" In the absence of the members of the Special Flag Commit- 
tee and its Chairman, Gen. Thomas M. Vincent, of the United States 
Army and a member of the Society of the District of Columbia, I have 
been requested to present his report. General Vincent has been un- 
avoidably detained in Washington. And not being a member of that 
committee or familiar with the contents of the report, I am not going to 
read it. If I were to attempt it I am afraid you would ask the suspen- 
sion of the reading of the report. I will say, however, from my own 
personal knowledge that General Vincent has done a great deal of 
work before the committees of Congress looking to the protection of 
the Flag. It was my pleasure to accompany him on two occasions be- 
fore the committees in the Senate and the House. Nothing was done 
in the last Congress, and nothing will he done at this session, as there 
will lie no general legislation gone into whatever, both 1 louses being 
occupied with that .subject that we are .all more or less interested in, the 
tariff. But these committees, especially the Senate committee, assured 
us that the hill would give absolute protection to our Flag when passed 
next December. Of course the committees never break their promises, 
the Congressional committees, that is. Occasionally you will find one 
or two ordinary Congressmen that do. And so I will simply state that I 
believe this bill will become a law in December next. There has been 
some reference in the remarks of the President General as to some 
decisions handed down by (he U. S. Commissioner of Patents for the 
protection of the Flag. My predecessor, as well as myself, have had the 
great honor of handing down numerous decisions, not only to protect 
the Flag, but the coats of arms of the United States and of the States 
throughout the world. We came to the protection of the Geneva Red 
Cross and the American \\c<\ Cross, and those emblems also can no 
longer lie used except as used by the societies. Therefore, Mr. Presi- 
dent General, I will submit this report to the Secretary General. 

Major Veat.K: In the State of Pennsylvania a bill was introduced in 
the House and one in the Senate that a candy maker be permitted to 
have the Flag upon the boxes which they sold their candy in. The 



PROCEEDINGS 01 ? BALTIMORE CONGRESS 1 I 5 

Slate Chapter took the matter up. It had been introduced in the 
Senate and reported favorably from the committee; had been introduced 
in the House and waiting its action. The State Society took the mat- 
ter up, the Philadelphia Chapter took the matter up and the bill in the 
Senate and the House by the effort of the State Society and the Phila- 
delphia Chapter was defeated. (Applause.) 

The President General: You have heard the report made on behalf 
of the Flag- Committee by President Moore and the supplementary 
remarks. What is your pleasure to do with the report, gentlemen? 

Moved that the report of the Flag Committee be received, filed, and 
printed in the proceedings of the Congress. 

The President General: Without objection it will hi- so ordered. 

REPORT OF THE SPECIAL FLAG COMMITTEE. 

Relative to Punishing tup Desecration, Mutilation, or Improper 
Use op the Flag op the United States. 

Gen. Thomas M. Vincent, U. S. A., Chairman, Washington, D. C. 

Cop. Ralph E. Prime, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Dr. Chari.es IT. Hughes. St. Louis, Mo. 

Cop. Arthur H. Prick, Oklahoma City. Okla. 

Chari.es B. Holman, Hopkinton, Mass. 

William E. Crawford, Richmond, Va. 

William E. Metzger, Nashville, Tenn. 

Mr. President General and Compatriots: 

As Chairman of your Special Flag Committee, I have the honor to 
submit for the Committee this report. December I, 1908, a circular let- 
ter was sent to the Presidents of State Societies of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, as follows: 

District op Copumiua Society, Sons op the American Revolution. 

Special Committee to Further Legislation to Prevent Desecration of the 
American Flag. 

General Thomas M. Vincent, Chairman; Commander John II. Moore, 
Hon. I. T. Du Bois, Hon. John Goode, Fred. D. Owen, Henry W. 
Samson, Wallace 1). McLean, Col. Fred. 0. Bryan, Col. Gilbert C. 
Kniffin, Zebina Moses, Philip Walker, Edgar P. Stocking, Mr. Wil- 
liams Donnally. 

Coordinated with the National Society, S. A. R., Hon. Henry Stock- 
bridge, President General; Gen. Thomas M. Vincent, Chairman of 
Flag Committee. 

The American Flag Association, Col. Ralph E. Prime, President; Gen. 
Thomas M. Vincent, Member of Executive Committee. 

Washington, D. C, December 1, 1908. 

President 

Society, Sons of the American Revolution 



I 1 6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

COMPATRIOT: At the meeting of the Executive Committee, National 
Society Sons of the American Revolution, September 26, 1908, it was 
recited that the Flag Committee would use every effort to secure the 
enactment, by the House of Representatives, of the Senate Bill 565, 
which passed the Senate May 20, 1908, to prevent and punish the dese- 
cration, mutilation, or improper use of the Flag of the United States of 
America. That bill, as passed by the Senate, can be seen, pages 139 
and 140 of the National Year Book, S. A. R., 1008. In that connection, 
page 139, the President General was instructed by the National Con- 
gress, a t the Buffalo meeting, to send a suitable message to the Judiciary 
Committee of the House of Representatives, in charge of the bill before 
that body. It was believed that the message would be potent in its 
influence, and it is now the duty of the National Flag Committee, S. A. 
R., to use its best effort in order to the speedy passage of Senate Bill 
565 by the blouse of Representatives. 

The Empire State Society, S. A. R., lias already requested its Presi- 
dent to appoint a special committee to interview Members of Congress 
and secure their aid in forwarding the passage of Senate Bill 505 at 
the session of the Congress now close at hand. 

I have, in person, placed before the House of Representatives Judici- 
ary Committee considerable literature on the subject, inclusive of the 
"Fifth Circular of Information" of the American Flag Association, 
1907-8, wherein is printed the action of the U. S. Supreme Court favor- 
able to the constitutionality of Flag legislation in the case of Halter 
and Iieywood vs. State of Nebraska. The decision, March 4, 1907, was 
delivered by Mr. Justice Harlan. 

I herewith send copies of the "American Flag" and "American Flag 
and American Flag Association," which embrace tzuo hearings before 
the Committee on Military Affairs, U. S. Senate. 

Let us continue to labor that the soul of the Flag may not be taken 
away! I may repeat, in substance, the recommendation of the President 
of the American Flag Association, "That every member should put 
forth earnest personal effort with Senators and Representatives in Con- 
gress — particularly when acquainted with them — and urge the enactment 
into law of these bills (now reduced to Senate Bill 565) during the 
present Congress." Then the law will cover the entire United States of 
America, and the soul of the Flag will not be taken away "by men of 
blood, in whose hands are iniquities." 

Our membership of the Sons of the American Revolution is about 
12,000, divided among 42 State Societies, including the District of 
Columbia, France, and Hawaii. The President General, in his last 
annual report, contemplates 25,000 at a date not remote, if State Socie- 
ties are energetic. Thus there will be along national lines a greatly 
effective and influential force, national in its organization, scope, and 
purposes. The most cherished desire, at this time, is to have a pure 
Flag, and, to that end, the Society has unification and coordination as 
a whole. "Patriotic education" is the watch-word, and thereby we are 
connected with the American Flag Association, which embraces 100 
patriotic associations [letter February 24, 1902, by President of Ameri- 
can Flag Association, pages 16 and 17 of Senate hearing, 57th Congress, 
1st Session], charged with the sacred duty of keeping the Flag pure — 
free from desecration, mutilation, or improper use in .all their forms. 
Unified and coordinated with us, we have the Grand Army of the 
Republic, which alone represents 300,000 old soldiers! Also, that power- 
ful organization, "The Daughters of the American Revolution," 65,000 
members. They are intensely interested in the passage of the bill! 
The desire of that organization — great in number, high in dignity, and 
sound in patriotism-— is evident from the record of the Senate hearing, 
April 27, 1908, pages 5 to 12. 



l'ROCKUDINGS OF HAI.TIMORK, CONGRESS 



I l 



On pages 18 and 19 of the Senate, 57th Congress hearing, will be 
found the "Regulations of Foreign Countries," prohibiting desecration 
of their flags. 

In patriotism we must not longer stand beneath foreign lands. 
Therefore, let it be enacted by the present Congress of the United 
Stales that the Star Spangled Banner shall not longer be desecrated! 
Fraternally your compatriot, 

Thomas M. Vincent, 
Brigadier General, U. S. A., Chairman Flag Committee, 

National Society, S. A. R. 

In addition to the foregoing, letters and telegrams, embracing neces- 
sary suggestions, were sent, as conditions demanded, to several of the 
Presidents. 

In February, 1909, I attended a hearing before the sub-Judiciary 
Committee of the House of Representatives, and, for its consideration, 
subsequently addressed a letter — extract as follows : ;,: * * "Referring 
to your request, by note the 5th instant, please find herewith copy of a 
letter read at the recent hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary, 
in regard to Flag legislation. I also send copies of pamphlets, referred 
to in the letter, which embrace two hearings before the Senate Com- 
mittee on Military Affairs." 

By note, February 5, 1009, the Hon, Richard Wayne Parker, M. C, 
Chairman of the Judiciary sub-Committee in charge of the subject, 
informed me as follows : "I am in receipt of your note of the 28th of 
January, referring to letter of Mr. Flenry C. Battis, President of the 
Massachusetts Society, Sons of the Revolution, in regard to Flag legis- 
lation. I had hoped to take up this matter before this, but have been 
so much occupied with work upon the Army and West Point appro- 
priation bills, that really time has not been afforded, so far, for this 
purpose. I hope to get ahead with the matter before long." 

Previously, during an interview with the Chairman of the House 
Judiciary Committee, I was informed by him that the subject would be 
determined by the sub-Committee, The communication before the sub- 
Committee embraced a valuable one from President F. B. Curtis, of the 
Connecticut Society, S. A. R. 

I deem it well to invite close attention to the valuable "Fifth Circular 
of Information, 1907-8," by the American Flag Association. Thai asso- 
ciation has for its object "fostering of public sentiment in favor of 
honoring the Flag of our country and preserving it from desecration, 
and of instituting and forwarding legal measures to prevent such 
desecration." All patriots should unite to that end! That "Fifth 
Circular," after enumerating cases of desecration, recites (page 21) 
that it was determined, in order to prevent desecration, that legislation 
should be sought in the halls of Congress. Congress was open to listen, 
but all the hearings obtained came to no practical result. The American 
Flag Association then turned to the several States and began to obtain 
legislation by them, with the result that, after ten years of labor, Flag 
legislation has been obtained "in every State north of the Potomac and 
the Ohio, and north of Arkansas and Texas and the Mexican boundary, 
and the galaxy of Northern States that stand in one band, all of them 
making criminal such acts of desecration, was completed this year 
(1907-8) in the adoption by the State of Nevada of a Flag law. Porto 
Rico also belongs to the same company." The enumeration is as fol- 
lows : Maine (1899), New Hampshire (1899), Vermont (1908), Massa- 
chusetts (1899), Rhode Island (1003), Connecticut (1899), New York 
(1905), New Jersey (1904), Pennsylvania (1897), Delaware (1903), 
Maryland (1902), Ohio (1902), Michigan (1901), Indiana (1901), Illi- 
nois (1899), Wisconsin (1901), Minnesota (1899), South Dakota 



[1.8 SONS 01? TJIM AMICKICAN RlCVOIyUTTON 

(1901), North Dakota (1901), Montana (1905), Wyoming (1905), 
Idaho (1905), Iowa (1900), Missouri (1903), Kansas (1905), Nebraska 
(1903), Colorado (inoi), Washington (1004), Utah (1903), Arizona 
(1899), California (1899), Oregon (1901), Porto Rico (1904), Nevada 
(1907). 

The Supreme Court of the United States, in March, 1907, affirmed 
the constitutionality of State Flag legislation, case of Halter and Hey- 
wood vs. State of Nebraska. In connection with that affirmation, Mr. 
justice Harlan said: * * * "From the earliest periods in the history 
of the human race banners, standards, and ensigns have been adopted 
as symbols of power and history of the peoples who love them. It 
is not then remarkable that the American people, acting through the 
legislative branch of the Government, early in their history prescribed 
a ilag as symbolical of the existence and sovereignty of the nation. 
Indeed, it would have been extraordinary if the Government had started 
this government, after its marvelous career, without giving it a Hag to 
be recognized as the emblem of the American Republic. For that Ilag 
every true American has not simply an appreciation, but a true affec- 
tion. N r o American, nor any foreign-born person who enjoys the privi- 
leges of American citizenship, ever looks upon it without taking pride- 
in the fact that, he lives under this free government. Hence, it has 
often occurred that insults to a flag have been the cause of war, and 
indignities in the presence of those who revere it have often been 
resented and sometimes punished on the spot." :f: * * 

In the absence of enactment of law by the Congress of the United 
States, the respective States have enacted Flag laws for the government 
of their respective peoples. 

If enactment by the Congress of the United States should supersede 
State laws of similar character, the States will not—they cannot — take 
exception! They will recognize that what they have supplied, in part, 
can well be extended by the Congress to the Union of the States! It 
is our sacred duty to strive energetically to secure legislation by the 
Congress, thus to secure uniform protection of the Flag in all the States 
and Territories. A step in that direction was taken by Congress 
through enactment of a new trade-mark law, which forbade the regis- 
tration of a trade-mark containing, in any part of it, the Flag of the 
United States. We trust, as said by the former Chairman of your Flag 
Committee, that the step so taken by Congress will help, eventually, 
toward the enactment of a Flag law which will reach the District of 
Columbia, the Territories of the United States, and the unorganized, 
or semi-organized, portions of the country. Moreover, it will have its 
effect upon the States which have nor yet enacted Flag laws. 

Once the House of Representatives passed a Flag law, but the Senate 
failed to pass it. Twice the .Senate passed Flag laws which failed in 
the House. We must go forward until we secure final favorable action 
by both Senate and House — the Congress! The duty of so doing should 
not be abandoned, but pressed by the National Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution and all other patriotic organizations embraced 
in the American Flag Association, as enumerated on pages 27 to 40 
of the "American Flag Association's 5th circular of information, 1907-8." 
1 herein the Association's distinguished President— our compatriot, Col. 
Ralph E. Prime — after ten years of most valuable labor, has well said: 
"We are now placed upon firm ground. Our legislation is approved 
as to principle and form and also as to criminal penalty and punishment 
that follows, and is so approved by the highest court in the land. There 
cannot be, any longer, question as to the effectiveness of our work. 
The question naturally arises — are we at the end of our work of legis- 
lation"? * ■* * And he has added: "1 trust that you will not abandon 
the effort to obtain Flag legislation from Congress. That work should 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BALTIMORE CONCRlCSS 



I l«) 



not be abandoned, but should be pressed with all the might of the 
Association." 

To that end I respectfully suggest that the American Flag Association 
frame a bill to be submitted to the coming regular session of the U. S. 
Congress. Thereafter it should be the .patriotic, sacred duty of this 
National Society of the Sons ol" the American Revolution, and all other 
organizations embraced in the American Flag Association, to heartily 
support that bill by energetic action. Any substitute fen* it should not 
be recognized ! 

Thomas M. Vincent, 
Chairman Flag Committee, National Society, S. A. R. 

The J'kKsiiiK NT G'KN Krai, : The report of the Committee on National. 
Parks. I will call on Compatriot Walter Kendall Watkins for that 
report. 

Air. Watkins: Mr. President General, and members of the Congress: 
The report has been put in print by Mr. W. V. Cox, Chairman of the 
Committee. It deals with the National parks, the monuments therein,, 
and the matter of the National forests; also the preservation of forests 
and reforestation. I understand that a considerable number of these 
reports has been printed. 1 will not take up further time of the Con- 
gress and will present the printed document as the report of the Com- 
mittee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL PARKS, 1909. 

Wiij.iam V. Cox, Chairman, Washington, D. C. 
WlUJAM A. Maki'.u:, New York, N. Y. 
II. K. Bush-Brown, Newburgh, N. Y. 
Judge J. A. CarTWRIGHT, Nashville, Tenn. 
Hon. J. Frankun Fort, East Orange, N. J. 
Walter K. Watkins, Boston, Mass. 
Harry H. Trice, Norfolk, Va. 

To the Baltimore Congress of the So>is of the American Revolution: 

Your Committee on National Parks begs leave to submit the follow- 
ing report on work accomplished during the past year, and recommenda- 
tions for future action. 

The Committee was represented at a hearing in January, 1909, before 
a committee of the U. S. House of Representatives, on the Bradley bill 
(see National Year Book, 1908, p. 143) "To Provide for a Park Road 
at the Fight-House Reservation at Stony Point, on the Hudson River, 
in the State of New York," an improvement urged by the Empire State 
and Illinois Societies, and recommended by the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution at the Buffalo Congress. Mr. 
Bradley, the author of the bill; Compatriot H. W. Samson, and Com- 
patriot Edward Ilagaman Hall, Secretary of the American Scenic and 
Historic Preservation Society, were also present and explained the 
necessity for the improvement. Congress was urged to appropriate the 
small sum of $7,500, requested by the War Department, to make the 






120 SONS 0I< T1113 AMERICAN RIvVOUrnoN 



, 






property of the United States accessible and conform to the well-kept 
vStatc Park. 

The; hearing was most interesting and instructive, reviewing what had 
been done by New York to mark historic sites and to preserve from 
destruction places of natural beauty. 

The Government land, the site of the most important fort at Stony 
Point during the War for Independence, and captured at the point of 
the bayonet by "Mad" Anthony Wayne and his intrepid followers, will, 
I regret, maintain its neglected appearance during the Hudson-Fulton 
Centennial Year, in great contrast to the park made beautiful by State 
appropriations, and further improved by a memorial gateway recently 
erected by the Daughters of the Revolution. 

Your Committee appreciated the honor of a hearing and the truth of 
the statement that where Anthony Wayne went there was a fight 
always. 

It was developed at the hearing that the policy of historic preserva- 
tion was inaugurated by the State of New York in 1849-50, when the 
State for $4,200 acquired Washington's Headquarters at Newburgh. 
Nothing further was done by the State in this line for 34 years, when 
the reservation at Niagara Falls was acquired. In 1885 the Adiron- 
dack and Catskill preserves were established. In 1887 the Senate House 
at Kingston was purchased. In 1895 the Saratoga battle monument 
grounds at Schuylerville, and the John Brown farm at North Elba, were 
secured. In 1S96 the St. Lawrence preserve. Since that time the State 
has acquired the Grant Cottage at Mount MacGregor, Stony Point 
Battlefield, Fake George Battlefield, Palisades Interstate Park, Clinton 
House at Poughkcepsie, Spy Island, Fort Brewerton, Sir Wm, Johnson's 
Mansion and Block House at Johnstown, Watkins Glen, Lelchworlh 
Park, Philipse Manor Hall at Yonkers, and last year Fire Island State 
Park off Long Island. 

In addition to this splendid record many monuments, such as the 
Prison Ship Martyrs Monument at Fort Green Park, Brooklyn, and the 
McKinlcy Monument at Buffalo, have been erected. We commend to 
the attention of our members and to the several States and the Con- 
gress of the United States, the broad policy of the State of New York, 
the splendid work of the Empire Slate Society, the American Scenic 
and Historic Preservation and other civic societies, and the generous 
and enlightening efforts of its citizens. 

Numerous bills were hopelessly presented to the last Congress of the 
United States to establish battlefield parks. 

Representative McCall, of Massachusetts, from the House Committee * 
on Library, reported favorably the measure providing for the erection 
of two memorial arches at Valley Forge. 

According to Mr. McCall, a considerable part of the encampment 
grounds of General Washington at Valley Forge has always been in 
forest and the greater part of the earthworks, consisting of intrcneh- 
ments, the star redoubt, and Forts Washington and Huntingdon-, have 
not been greatly affected by the elements or disturbed by man. 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BAI/l'lxMORiC CONGRESS 



121 



An imposing celebration of the anniversary of the evacuation was 
held June 19, 1878, and the result was the formation of the Centennial 
and Memorial Association of Valley Forge by patriotic women, who 
purchased the house which George Washington occupied during the 
latter and greater part of the encampment and restored it to the condi- 
tion in which it was when occupied by Washington. 

The General Assembly of Pennsylvania, in recent years, has appro- 
priated liberally for the acquisition of the lands where the encampment 
was and for their improvement. More than $300,000 has been appro- 
priated by the State of Pennsylvania for this purpose. 

A part of the improvements made consist of an observatory upon the 
summit of Mt. Joy, from which there is a vista of widely-extended 
scenery; between five and six miles of macadam roads and paths; Forts 
Washington and Huntingdon and other intrenchments have been re- 
stored; the springhouse at the Washington headquarters has been re- 
built; two stone guardhouses and five log huts, used by park guards, 
and a reproduction of those used in 1778, have been erected, and fifteen 
large granite markers to locate positions of brigades are among the 
improvements which have been provided. 

The old school house built by Letitia Aubrey in 1705, stones of which 
are marked 1714 and 1716, which was used as a hospital during the 
encampment, has been restored. Six of the twenty brass cannon 
donated by the United States Government have been mounted upon 
carriages of the type used during the Revolutionary War, according to 
designs furnished by the British war office. 

After reciting what the State of Pennsylvania, has done for the pre- 
servation and restoration of this historic locality, the Committee says : 



"The Government of the United States may most appropriately ap- 
ply the modest sum of $50,000 for the erection of suitable monuments to 
commemorate the heroism of Washington and his army, the invaluable 
services of Baron Steuben and other citizens of foreign countries who 
aided in securing victory to the American cause, and in commemoration 
of the 3,000 men of Washington's army who died at Valley Forge dur- 
ing the encampment." 

Maine has located a marker to indicate the location of her soldiers who 
served with the other troops, and Massachusetts and other States have 
either appropriated, money or are considering so doing for the erection 
of monuments at Valley Forge. 

A magnificent equestrian statue of General Anthony Wayne, the work' 
of our Compatriot Bush-Brown, of this Committee, was unveiled at 
Valley Forge, with appropriate ceremonies, * on June 20 last. On the 
base of the statue are the words uttered by Wayne when wounded at 
Stony Point : "Lead me forward." 

Mr. McCall has been a conspicuous advocate of measures of much 
interest to the country, including the enlargement of the Capitol grounds 
at Washington and the erection of a memorial to Abraham Lincoln, 

A. bill of great interest to the soldiers of the Civil War was thai of 
Mr. Lafean for the construction of a highway from the White [i'ouse 



SONS uK Tin-) AMERICAN KKYUI,UTK)N 



to the Gettysburg National Park. No action was taken on that bill, nor 
on one proposed by Compatriot Senator Daniel, of Virginia, providing 
for the purchase of private ground on which stand certain Federal and 
Confederate monuments on the battlefields of Bull Run. 

Despite discouragements there has been a great patriotic awakening 
in every section of the country, as shown by the interest in preserving 
historic records, the increase in patriotic education and devotion to the 
flag, the acquisition by cities and States of historic ground for parks and 
memorials, and by the large number of markers and tablets erected by 
Revolutionary and other societies. Today there are comparatively few 
graves of soldiers or sailors of the American Revolution that have not 
been reverently marked or located for future action. 

Among the monuments erected within the last few months may be 
mentioned the one at old Fort Massac, which was erected in a State 
park through the efforts of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 
This old fort in Southern Illinois was the place where George Rogers 
Clark began his conquest of the Great Northwest. It was here also that 
the American flag was first unfurled in Illinois. 

Pennsylvania has shown unusual interest, having marked during the 
past year twenty-one historic places and two trails. 

It is gratifying to know that "Carlton," a Colonial mansion where 
Washington had his headquarters just prior to moving his "ragged 
Continentals" to Valley Forge, which for some time has been threatened 
with demolition in order to secure additional ground for a filtration 
plant for Philadelphia, has been saved from destruction by the untiring 
efforts of the Germantown Historic Club and members of the patriotic 
societies. 

The marking at Baldwin, Kansas, of the old Santa Fe Trail by the 
Daughters of the American Revolution is as interesting as the marking 
by the Society of Colonial Wars in the District of Columbia of the 
road over which marched to destruction the ill-fated Braddock. 

The marking of the Oregon Trail; the Continental Road at Spring- 
field, N. Y., with a monument to Gen. James Clinton; the Lincoln Farm 
at Hodgenville, Ky. ; the Quintcn Bridge memorial at Salem, N. J.; 
surveying and marking of Fort Stanwix by the Gansevoort-Willet 
Chapter, S. A. R., and the Fort Stanwix Chapter, D. A. R. ; the Fort 
McClure Monument at Bloomsburg, Pa.; the General Herkimer Monu- 
ment at Herkimer, N. Y. ; the Nathan Hale Monument at St. Paul, 
Minn.; the arch at the entrance of the Colonial Cemetery and the 
boulder marking Johnstown, N. Y., battle-field; the erection of a 
marker at Newtown battle-field by the local Chapter of the S. A.. R. ; 
and the erection of tablets on numerous sites on the Niagara frontier, 
may be noted as work accomplished by this Society and other patriotic 
organizations during the year. 

This record should encourage our members to renewed action in 
saving and marking the remaining historic fields in our contest for 
liberty. 



PROCEEDINGS OL' BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



12; 



We now take up another phase of the Committee's work, for which 
we have been thanked by the Secretary of Agriculture. 

Forest Reserves — Preservation of Forests. 

Since our last report the Judiciary Committee of the House of Repre- 
sentatives has decided that the United States can acquire lands for the 
protection of navigable streams. 

This decision is far-reaching, and settled in the House, for the pres- 
ent, at least, the question of the constitutionality of the purchase of the 
watersheds of the Appalachian and White mountains for forest re- 
serves, mentioned in a previous report. 

The Secretary of Agriculture, the Honorable James Wilson, who is 
always prepared for emergencies, thereupon recommended the purchase 
of 600,000 acres of land in New England for the White Mountain 
forest and 5,000,000 acres in the Southern States for the Appalachian 
forest, and bills to carry out these recommendations were promptly 
introduced in Congress. 

The movement fur mountain parks received great impetus from the 
Conference on Conservation of Natural Resources, one of the most 
important assemblies in American history, held at the White House, 
in May, 190S. The startling conditions that were shown to be con- 
fronting the American people aroused the entire country, and friends 
and champions were found in every State. 

In January last the Boston Merchants' Association adopted the fol- 
lowing resolutions : 

"Voted: That the business interests of New England require imme- 
diate legislation by Congress to prevent the destruction of the forests 
on the high watersheds of the White mountains, and the Boston Mer- 
chants' Association strongly urges that action to prevent the lamentable 
consequences of the deforestation of this region, which action has been 
taken three times by the Senate, and which has had the hearty indorse- 
ment of both the President and President-elect, be no longer delayed by 
the House of Representatives or its committee on agriculture." 

In its letter sent to the various bodies the Merchants' Association 
says : 

"The injurious effects upon the business interests and industries of 
New England, which would result from destruction of the forests, have 
not been generally appreciated. After the forests have been removed by 
the present destructive method of cutting, fires are practically sure to 
follow and burn over the region, the thin layer of soil which now covers 
the rocks on the highest slopes will be quickly washed down into the 
valleys, leaving nothing to support vegetation. 

"The devastating effects which this would have on the climate of New 
England and upon her water courses have been fully and frequently 
explained by President Roosevelt, by the Secretary of Agriculture, by 
the National Forester, and by many other recognized authorities. 

"The west: and south have vigorously urged their claims. New Eng- 
land has not. She must begin now. We have today 145 national for- 
ests — not one in New England. The best information we can obtain 
from Washington leads to the belief that if New England's cause is 
presented to Congress as it should be, adequate legislation, not yet 
formulated into a bill, can be passed at the present session of Congress. ,r 



124 SONS 01? THIS AMKK1CAN REVOLUTION 

It has appeared at hearings before the Committee on Agriculture at 
Washington that there arc over $400,000,000 invested in manufacturing 
interests on streams which flow from the White mountains. These in- 
terests employ 200,000 operatives, pay wages of about $60,000,000 a year, 
and have a yearly output of about $300,000,000. 

On the Connecticut alone there are 3,000 mills, while the Secretary of 
Agriculture has described the Merrimac as the most notable of any 
river of its size in the country for the amount of water power generated 
upon it. 

The Government has already spent about $3,000,000 in aiding naviga- 
tion on these rivers, all of which work will be injured, if not destroyed, 
by the silting up of the river channels occasioned by erosion among the 
mountains. The additional question of water supply has been em- 
phasized in many cities. 

When it is realized that on the higher slopes of the mountains it 
takes 125 years for a spruce tree to grow to six inches in diameter, the 
importance of not stripping the slopes of spruce for pulp is apparent. 

Action of the same general character was taken by organizations 
throughout the country, and Congress was flooded with petitions and 
memorials, often presented by delegations from cities and towns remote 
from the capital and the region directly affected by these national 
measures. 

A bill to acquire national forest reserves passed the Senate on May 
16, 1908, and went to the House, where hearings of great interest were 
held by the Committee on Agriculture. 

The friends of conservation of the forests argued that the question 
was not a local one; that the acquisition of the watersheds at the heads 
of navigable streams was tin* only way to secure the permanent develop- 
ment of our inland waterways. They claimed, with the authority of 
experience in other lands, that agriculture, lumber, the manufacturing 
interests, and consumers alike would be benefited; that the establishing 
incidentally of national parks in the White and Appalachian mountains 
would be of great benefit to the public as health resorts and places of 
recreation for the people. 

The bill was amended by the Committee by substituting the Weeks 
bill, which, after a most instructive debate, passed the House by a 
narrow non-partisan vote. The bill was returned to the Senate and 
died in the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry when, on March 4, 
1909, the Congress adjourned. 

Too much praise cannot be given those members of the Sons of the 
American Revolution in the different States for the part they took, 
especially in convincing members of a reluctant Mouse, finally securing 
a majority vote. 

I feel that I would be derelict and do an injustice if I did not com- 
mend our sister Society, the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
for the resolutions adopted by their National Society, in which is .set 
forth that the health of the people, that water power for navigation 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



125 



and for vast manufacturing interests, that electrical energy for heating 
and lighting homes and for culinary purposes, and that the conservation 
of the natural resources of the country are all dependent upon the 
preservation of the forests, and for endorsing the policy of conserving 
all the natural resources, woods and waters, soils and ores, and for 
having used all honorable means in furthering the passage of the bill 
which provided for acquiring national forests in the southern Appala- 
chian and White mountains. 

Old Suffolk Chapter, S. A. R., of Chelsea, Mass., inspired by our 
accomplished and persuasive Historian General, Mr. W. K. Watkins, 
a member of the Committee on National Parks, did most effective work. 

Among the members of the Sons of the American Revolution taking 
an active part in the Convention of Governors and in hearings before 
Congress may be mentioned our compatriots Theodore Roosevelt, Gov. 
Charles E. Hughes, of New York; Gov. J. Franklin Fort, of New 
Jersey, a member of the Committee on National Parks; Gov. Curtis 
Guild, Jr., of Massachusetts; and Gov. Fletcher Proctor, of Vermont. 



National Forests. 

On February 18 last Congress passed an act to create the Calaveras 
Bigtree National Forest, by which the Secretary of Agriculture was 
empowered to obtain for the United States the complete title to certain 
lands in California and protect for all time the big trees, sequoia U'ash- 
ingtoniana. 

Including Calaveras forest, there are now 146 national forests in the 
United States, two in Alaska, and one in Porto Rico, with a total area 
of about 200,000,000 acres. 

These lands have, been reserved from settlement by act of Congress 
and proclamation of the President. 

Few appreciate the fact that eleven of these forests, with an area of 
13787,600 acres, are located in Arizona, two of the eleven, Coconino 
and Kaibab, being game preserves. 

Two forests, with an area of 3,189,781 acres, are located in Arkansas; 
twenty, with an area of 26,583,489 acres, in California; eighteen, with 
an area of 15,693,157 acres, in Colorado; two, with 674,891 acres, in 
Florida; nineteen, with 20,099,029 acres, in Idaho; one, with 302,387 
acres, in Kansas; two, with 163,373 acres, in Michigan; two, with 1,204,- 
486 acres, in Minnesota; eighteen, with 20,389,696 acres, in Montana; 
one, with 556,072 acres, in Nebraska; seven, with 4,572,108 acres, in 
Nevada; ten, with 9,693,4*3 acres, in New Mexico; one, with 13,940 
acres, in North Dakota; one, Wichita, with 60,800 acres, in Oklahoma, 
which is also a national game preserve; thirteen, with 16,221,368 acres, 
in Oregon; two, with 1,294,440 acres, in South Dakota; fourteen, with 
7,436,327 acres, in Utah; ten, with 12,065,500 acres, in Washington; 
eleven, with 8,998,7-3 acres, in Wyoming; two, with 26,761,623 acres, 
in Alaska; and one, with 65,950 acres, in Porto Rico. 



126 



SONS Dl' TIIIC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



National. Monuments. 

There are eighteen national monuments created under the act of June 
8, 1906, which act was secured largely through the efforts of the Smith- 
sonian Institution and the scientific departments of the Government. 



National Military Parks. 

There are four national military parks, on the battle-fields of Gettys- 
burg, Vicksburg, Shiloh, and Chickamauga. 

Tables giving the names, locations, area, and date of establishment 
of national parks and national monuments and the act of .1906, com- 
piled for the Committee by Mr. C. S. Chapman, Assistant Forester, 
Department of Agriculture, are appended to this report. 

Your attention is invited to the inequality of geographic distribution 
of these reserves for the people, emphasizing the early contention of 
the Committee that the Government should in all fairness acquire the 
historic battle-fields of the American Revolution and appropriately mark 
them. 

Again we commend this course, and the plan of enlargement of the 
United States military reservation at West Point so as to include the 
historic highlands of the Hudson. 

A year ago today Dr. Gifford Pinchot, Forester of the United States, 
wrote your chairman as follows: 

''You will, I know, pardon me for saying that I believe your Com- 
mittee has a very urgent work to do in emphasizing the importance of 
protecting in their natural condition and beauty those parts of ovir 
country which have great historic interest. AVhatever may be done in 
this way will fit in well with plans to conserve the forests." 

We favor the protection of the forests on the watersheds of navi- 
gable streams as a wise public policy and good economies. It is a 
practical question at the same time and will incidentally create national 
parks for the people. 

We believe it to be an enlightened policy for the Government to 
secure and preserve places of great natural beauty, archeological sites, 
and relics and ruins as well as the so-called "natural wonders." Their 
utilization for public education will commend itself to the members of 
this Society, who arc so deeply interested in the welfare and advance- 
ment of the American people. 



Respectfully submitted, 



W. V. Cox, Chairman. 



PROCEEDINGS 01' BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



12/ 



APPENDIX. 

NATIONAL PARKS. 

Name. Location. . Arca Established. 

in acres. 

(Wyoming-, 1,985,721 ~) 
Montana, r. 18, 496 > 2,142,726. Act Mar. 1,1872 
Idaho, 38,503 J 

Hot Springs Reservation . . .Arkansas 

Hot Springs Reservation . . .Arkansas 912 

Sequoia National Park California 1 61,597 



General Grant National 

Park California 

Yosemite National Park . . . .California 



Act June 16, 1S80 

, Act May 23, 1906 

Act Sept. 25, 1S90 

Act Oct. 1, 1S90, 



2,536. 



Includes Yosemite Valley 

and Mariposa Grove California 719,622, 

Casa Grand Ruin Arizona .480 



Mt. Rainier National Park.. Washington 207,360 

Crater Lake National Park.. Oregon '59,360 

Piatt National Park, form- J 

erly Sulphur Springs I T -,. ™ ■ , G D 

,, - xt Indian territory 84S 

Reservation. Name ,, T /-\i 1 u \ 
. , , . . . (Now Oklahoma). 

changed by joint reso- | v 

lution. J 

Wind Cave National Park. .South Dakota 10,522 

Sullys Hill Park .North Dakota 780 

Mesa Verde National Park. .Colorado 



Act Oct. 1, 1890 

Act Oct. 1, 1890 

Act Feb. 7, 1905 

Act June 1 1, 1906 
Ex. Or. Ju.22, i8q2 

Act Mar. 2, 1889 

Act Mar. 2, 1899 

Act May 22, 1902 

Act July 1, 1902. 

Act Apr. 21, 1904. 

Act June 9, 1903. 
Proc. June 2, 1904. 

Act Apr. 27, 1904. 

Act June 29, 1906. 



NATIONAL MONUMENTS 

CREATED UNDER ACT OF JUNE 8, 1906. 



Devils Tower, Wyoming Sept. 24, 

Petrified Forest, Arizona .Dec. 8, 

Montezuma Castle, Arizona Dec. 8, 

El Morro (Inscription Rock),New Mexico. Dec. S, 

Chaco Canyon, New Mexico Mar. 1 1 , 

Lassen Peak,* California May 6, 

Cinder Cone,* California May 6, 

Gila Cliffs,* New Mexico Nov. 16, 

Tonto,* Arizona Dec. 19, 

Muir Woods, California Jan. 9, 

Grand Canyon,* Arizona Jan. 1 1, 

Pinnacles,* California Jan. 16, 

Jewel Cave,* South Dakota .Feb. 7, 

Natural Bridges, Utah April 16, 

Lewis and Clark, Montana. May 11, 

Tuuiacacori, Arizona Sept. 5, 

Wheeler,* Colorado Dec. 7, 

Mt. Olympus, Washington Mar. 2, 

*l Y ocate<l in National Forests. 



4cr< 



Total. 



1906. 


• 1,152.91 


LI52. 91 


T906. 


. 60,776.02 


61,928.93 


1906. 


160.00 


62,088.93 


1906. 


T 60.OO 


62,24S. 93 


] 907 . 


. 20,629.40 


82,878.33 


1907. 


I,28o.OO 


84,158.33 


1907. 


5,120.00 


89,278.33 


1907. 


160.OO 


89*438.33 


1907. 


640.OO 


9°.°78.33 


1 908 . 


295.OO 


9°.373-33 


1 90S. 


806,400.00 


S96,773-33 


1 908 . 


2,o8o.OO 


S98.853.33 


1908. 


I,2,So.OO 


900,133-33 


1 908 . 


I20.00 


900,253.33 


1908. 


160.OO 


900,413.33 


1908. 


IO.OO 


900,423.33 


1908. 


30O.OO 


900,723.33 


1909. 


169.60 


900,892.93 



J28 SONS Off Til 15 AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Couection of Antiquities. National, Monuments. 
Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat., 225). 

Any person who shall appropriate, excavate, injure, or destroy any 
historic or prehistoric ruin or monument, or any 

_ Historic and pre- object of antiquity, situated on lands owned or 
historic monuments controlled by the Government of the United 
protected. Trespass. States, without the permission of the Secretary 
of the Department of the Government having 
jurisdiction over the lands on which said antiquities are situated, shall, 
upon conviction, be fined in a sum of not more than live hundred dollars 
or be imprisoned for a period of not more than ninety days, or shall 
suffer both line and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court. 

SEC. 2. That the President of the United States is hereby authorized, 
in his discretion, to declare by public proclama- 

Objectsof historic lion historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric 
and scientific interest structures, and other objects of historic or 
may be reserved as scientific interest that arc situated upon the lands 
national monuments, owned or controlled by the Government of the 
United States to be national monuments, and 
may reserve as a part thereof parcels of land the limits of which in all 
cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible with the proper 
care and management of the objects to be protected: Provided, That 
when such objects are situated upon a tract covered by a bona fide 
unperfected claim or held in private ownership, the tract, or so much 
thereof as may be necessary for the proper care and management of the 
object, may be relinquished to the Government, and the Secretary of 
the Interior is hereby authorized to accept the relinquishment of such 
tracts in behalf of the Government of the United States. 

SEC. 3. That permits for the examination of ruins, the excavation of 
archaeological sites, and the gathering of objects 

Permits for exami- of antiquity upon the lands under their respec- 
nation, excavation, tive jurisdictions may be granted by the Secre- 
and collection. taries of the Interior, Agriculture, and War to 

institutions which they may deem properly 
qualified to conduct such examination, excavation, or gathering, subject 
to such rules and regulations as they may prescribe: Provided, That the 
examinations, excavations, and gatherings are undertaken for the benefit 
of reputable museums, universities, colleges, or other recognized scien- 
tific or educational institutions, with a view to increasing the knowledge 
of such objects, and that the gatherings shall be made for permanent 
preservation in public museums. 

Sec. 4. That the Secretaries of the Departments aforesaid shall 
make and publish from time to time uniform 

Uniform rules and rides and regulations for the purpose of carry- 
regulations, ing out the provisions of this act. 

The President GenErai, : You have heard the report of the Commit- 
tee on National Parks, and in view of the statement that it has been 
printed the Chair desires to say that not only has it been printed, but 
that the Secretary General has a large number of them which can be 
distributed to the delegates of the Congress. The report in the absence 
of objection will be received and included in the proceedings of this 
Congress. The Chair hears none and it is so ordered. The next is the 
Press Committee. 

Mr. Clark: The Press Committee has no written or printed report to 



PROCEEDINGS OF BAI/TIMORE CONGRESS 



12(J 



make. I can say, however, that the press of the country has been 
advised of the doings of this Society by sending copies of the OFFICIAL 
BULLETIN to newspapers in the several States and the officers of the 
State Societies have been requested to and have informed their news- 
papers of their patriotic doings. I think the press of the country has 
treated the Society in a dignified way. 

The President General, : You have heard the report of the Press 
Committee. In the absence of objection that report will be received, 
filed, and placed on record. Is there objection? The Chair hears none 
and it is so ordered. 

Committee on Pensions and Muster Rolls. 

Mr. Marsh : In the absence of the Chairman of that Committee, who 
has handed me his report as a member of it, I will read it to the 
Society. I will assure the compatriots that it is very brief. (Reads 
Committee report.) While this report bears only the signature of the 
Chairman, it has the endorsement of the Secretary and the approval of 
the other members of the Committee. I told Mr. Moses, in connection 
with this report, that 1 would make this statement for the informa- 
tion of those present in reference to the carding system. This has been 
suspended in part for some time, but is going to be taken up with re- 
newed force and activity and I am authorized by the Commissioner of 
Pensions to state to you that an additional force will be put upon the 
work, and the work completed as early as it can be done. When you 
realize that this is not a part of the regular work of the Bureau, and is 
done as a matter of courtesy by the Commissioner, you will see what is 
being done for us. I submit the report with this statement of the 
soldiers of the Revolutionary AVar. It may be interesting to you to 
know how many there were. Some time ago I was asked how many 
soldiers there were in that war and I had to say I did not know, but 
the total number of pensions granted for service was 62,069. 

REPORT OK COMMITTEE ON PENSION AND MUSTER 

ROLLS. 

Zebina Moses, Chairman., Washington, D. C. 

Col. R. W. G.UTHRTE, Pittsburg, Penna. 

Col. Wii.uam R. Thompson, Washington, D. C. 

HERUERT W. Kimbaix, Boston, Mass. 

Major E. B. Toyman, Chicago, 111. 

W r . L. Marsh, Washington, D. C. 

Walter Hiix Crockett, St. Albans, Vt. 



To the Baltimore Congress: 

Your Committee on Pension and Muster Rolls regrets to report that 
but little progress has been made in the Pension Bureau in the work of 
carding the Revolutionary Pension papers. 

As explained in reports of the Committee to previous Congresses 
these cards, about 6 inches by \\'i inches, contain, on both sides of 
cards, important information of personal, historical, and genealogical 



I30 SONS 01- Til 15 AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

character digested from a number of papers in each pension case. Cards 
arc made up, not for the pensioners themselves only; they are made 
for witnesses who were soldiers but not pensioners. 

These cards frequently contain items as to descendants, dates, names 
of places, and special services, that can be found nowhere' else, and the 
completion of the work and subsequent publication by the Government 
is a matter of the greatest importance to all Societies based on Revolu- 
tionary ancestry. 

A number of important papers and some valuable signatures have 
been discovered in the process of carding, and they are to form part of 
an exhibit to be sent to the coming Exposition at Seattle. One of these 
is an Orderly Book of the 8th Massachusetts Regiment from September 
24, 1778, to July 9, 1779, while the Regiment was stationed at or near 
West Point, Danbury, Pcekskill, and Middlebrook. The book, as 
transcribed by typewriter, contains 157 pages of most interesting details 
of the soldiers' life in the Revolutionary camps. 

The total number of Revolutionary Pension cases is 62,069. Of these 
but 11,713 have been summarized and carded. Only 952 cards were 
made during the past year. 

The explanation is given your Committee, that the extra demands 
made on the Pension Office force on account of the passage of the 
service pension bill for the Civil War soldiers, caused a partial suspension 
of the work in the Revolutionary Pension section. Nearly a month 
was lost through the use of the Pension Building for Inauguration pur- 
poses. Also the clerks who would otherwise have been employed on 
the cards have been occupied on correspondence relating to Revolu- 
tionary ancestors, which involved much labor in searching the original 
papers; these letters have often been as many as 30 per day. 

When the cards are finished and the digests printed by the Govern- 
ment and distributed to the principal libraries of the country, this 
searching and correspondence will no longer be required. 

The desirability of preparing and printing these summary cards was 
first presented at the St. Louis Congress of our Society in 1904, and our 
action then taken was subsequently endorsed by the Congress of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, yet it appears that but one- 
sixth of the Revolutionary Pension cases have been carded in five years. 
A resolution was introduced in the Massachusetts State Senate on Janu- 
ary 22, 1909, reading as follows: 

Senate No. 68. 

Presented by Senator Parker of Suffolk. Federal Relations. Senate, 
January 22, 1909. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Nine. 
Resolution Relative to Rolls of Revolutionary Regiments and Com- 
panies and to Statements regarding Revolutionary Pensioners. 

Whereas, the last soldier of the Revolution passed away years ago, 
and pensions based upon services of ancestors in the Revolution have 
almost ceased to exist, and further protection to the interests of the 
National Government by withholding from the people the details of 
Revolutionary pension cases or rolls of Revolutionary regiments and 
companies is unnecessary, and 

Whereas, Massachusetts furnished a large percentage of the soldiers 
of the Revolution and the detailed statements of their services contained 
in said statements and rolls are of great historic and genealogical value 
to the vState and to the descendants living in Massachusetts as well as 



PROCEEDINGS 01- BALTIMORE CONGRESS 131 

to the large numbers of such descendants living in other States, there- 
fore 

Resolved, That our Senators and Representatives in Congress are 
recommended to take early concerted action to bring about public access 
to said statements and rolls, with the right to copy them in whole or in 
part, under such conditions and regulations as may be necessary for 
their safety and preservation; and that a copy of this resolution be 
forwarded to the President of the United States, the Secretary of War, 
the Commissioner of Pensions, and to each of our Senators and Repre- 
sentatives in Congress. 

Mr. Herbert W. Kimball, of this Committee, attended the hearing 
given by the Committee on Federal Relations of the Massachusetts 
State Senate upon the Resolution above quoted, and in his speech on 
the subject read the report of this Committee at the Buffalo Congress, 
explaining the aims and efforts of our Society. 

If the carding and publication desired by this Society is to be of any 
benefit for the increase of our membership it is evident that more rapid 
progress should be made. Your Committee, therefore, endorses the 
preamble of the Massachusetts Resolution and recommends that dele- 
gates of this Congress use their influence individually, and by State 
Society resolutions, with the Senators and Representatives in the United 
States Congress from their respective States, asking them to take such 
action as may be necessary to have sufficient clerical force employed to 
complete the summary cards or digests of the Revolutionary pension 
papers at an early date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Zebina Moses, 

Chairman. 

The President General: You have heard the report of the Com- 
mittee on Pension and Muster Rolls. Without objection it will be 
received and placed on file by the Secretary General and printed in the 
proceedings of the Congress. Is there objection? The Chair hears 
none, and it will be so ordered. 

The Secretary Generae presented the following communication, and 
it was referred to the Executive Committee: 

Wilmington, Dee., April 21, 1909. 

At a meeting of the Delaware Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, held this date, the following resolution was unanimously 
adopted : 

Resolved, That the Delaware Society request the National Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution to take measures to secure the 
printing of all available muster and pension rolls in possession of the 
National Government, at as early a date as possible. 

Second, That we memorialize the Senators and Representatives from 
the_ State of Delaware to ask Congress for an appropriation sufficient 
to insure the publication of all the pension and muster rolls in pos- 
session of the National Government as soon as can be done. 

The President Generae: The Committee on Publication has a report 
to make. 



I32 SONS 01? Til); AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATION. 

Henry V. A. Josun, Chairman, Providence, R. I. 
Dr. Moses G. Parker, Lowell, Mass. 
A. Howard Ci.akk, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Parker: In the absence of the chairman I am requested to give 
some figures in reference to the publications, and I would say that the 
Committee feels that the Society can congratulate itself on the success 
of the Official BueeETin. It was wholly due to our Secretary General, 
and his efforts and work would be greatly facilitated if the State 
Societies would respond and give early reports of their Societies. The 
Societies are well reported so far as we can get the information. I wish 
to say that the BueeE'HN has lived within its appropriation. You ap- 
propriated last year $[,800 for its publication. For printing it cost 
$1,092; the estimate was $1,350. Mailing labor cost $97; the estimate- 
was $150. Addressing cost $47; the estimate was $50. Postage cost 
§73; the estimate was $50. The envelopes cost $120; the estimate was 
$150. There is on hand the stencil addresses and other equipment, 
costing §336, available for future use. Therefore our expenditures on 
the BuEEETlN were $1,767, against the $1,800 that was appropriated. 
The same economy has been used in the publication of the annual Year 
Book, and I would like to close, Air. President General, by recommend- 
ing that the same appropriation be given this year for the publication 
of the BuEEE'l-iN and the Year Book, and the same economy, I know, 
will be exercised. 

The President GENERAE: You have heard the report of the Com- 
mittee on Publication. \n the absence of objection the report will be 
received, placed on file by the Secretary General, and printed. Is there 
objection? The Chair hears none and it is so ordered. The question 
then recurs upon the motion of Dr. Parker that the same appropriation 
be made for the ensuing year, to be placed at the disposal of the Com- 
mittee on Publication for the purpose of defraying the cost of printing, 
addressing, and distributing the BuEEE'HN and the printing of the Year 
Book. Are there any remarks upon this question? 

Mr. MarbeE : In view of tin; possibly much Larger size of the Year 
Book this year, on account of the number of long reports which have 
been presented, f would like to ask \)\\ Parker if he thinks the amount 
set aside for the 1908 Year Book would be large enough to cover the 
Year Book for 1909. I would suggest that the matter be left to the 
Executive Committee to pass upon. 

The President GENERAE: You hear the substitute offered by the 
compatriot from New York, that the mailer be referred to the new- 
Executive Committee with power to act. 

(Motion accepted by Dr. Parker and seconded.) 

The substitute having been accepted by Dr. Parker, the question re- 
curs upon the motion of the compatriot from New York, that the 
matter of the continuation of the publication and distribution of the 



PROCEEDINGS oK liAIJIMOKl', CONGRESS 133 

OFFICIAL Bulletin and the publication and distribution of the Year 



Book be referred to the new Executive Committee of the Society, with 
power to that committee to act. 
Carried. 

REPORT OF NAVAL RECORDS COMMITTEE. 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman. 
Rear Admikat, George W. Bajrd, U. S. N. 
Rear Admirae Colby M. Chester, U. S. N. 

Commander J. II. Moore : I have only a short report to make as 
Chairman of the Committee on Naval Records. Owing to the many 
changes in the officialdom of the Navy Department during- the past year, 
we can report no progress, but we do recommend that the Committee 
be continued. (Applause.) 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: Committee on Local Chapters. That com- 
mittee was authorized to report to the Executive Committee, but it may 
be proper that such report should be made to this Congress. Dr. 
Parker. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LOCAL CHAPTERS. 

Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, Chairman. 
Frank B. Steele. 
Col. Isaac F. Mack. 
Nelson A. McClary. 
Commander J. II. MoorE. 

Dr. Parker: As Chairman of the Committee on Chapters, I will say 
that the Committee was chosen to make a report to the Executive 
Committee. The Committee did all it could and got as much infor- 
mation as they possibly could. There were several recommendations, 
but the substance of the Committee's report is embraced in the three 
recommendations which were published in the March Officiae Bul- 
letin. The Chapter matter, as you know, is at present in the hands 
of the State Societies, it being given them by the National Society to 
manage their own affairs. Therefore the Chapter matter comes under 
the State Societies. It seems to me from the information that I have 
been able to gather that the Chapters are practically social organiza- 
tions; that the serial part belonging to the Chapters is overlooked; 
that they are not thoroughly informed of what they can do and what 
they might do; their social privileges arc greater than either the State 
or the National Society. If properly formed and with the proper men 
at the head they will give us the best results, and the largest increase 
we can possibly get in the State and National Society will come from 
the State Chapters. All that the Committee at this time can do — and 
this is the report to the Executive Committee — your committee recom- 



134 sons oi- the American revolution 

mends to those State Societies that have no fixed, established dues to 
establish such dues as soon as practicable at a minimum of $1.50 while 
the annual dues of the National Society are $0.50, thus leaving the 
minimum State fee $1.00 and the National Society fee' $0.50; that 
Chapters be recognized by the State Societies if practicable by making 
the Presidents of Chapters of a specified size ex officio members of the 
State Board of Managers; that a standing committee of the National 
Society be appointed to advise the State Societies with reference to 
State and Chapter organizations, to be known as the Advisory Com- 
mittee on Chapters. 

The President General, : You have heard the report of the Com- 
mittee on Local Chapters. Without objection that report will be re- 
ceived, placed on file by the Secretary General, and pritned in the min- 
utes. Is there objection? The Chair hears none, and it will be so 
ordered. There was a recommendation, as I caught the reading of the 
report, for the appointment of a standing committee. I was not quite 
certain that I understood the scope of the powers of that standing 
committee. Is it to further consider this matter of Chapters, or to 
perform a definite duty? 

Dr. Parker: It is further to consider the subject, advise with State 
Societies, and to report to the Executive Committee. 

The President General : The recommendation of the Committee, as 
I understand it, is that a standing committee of the National Society 
be appointed to advise the State Societies with reference to State and 
Chapter organization, to be known as the "Advisory Committee on 
Chapters," and they would have the duty, of course, of reporting to 
each Congress in reference to any plan. Do you move the appointment 
of that committee, Dr. Parker? 

Dr. Parker: I do. 

The President General: You hear the motion of Dr. Parker, that 
the committee which has existed during this past year as a special 
committee on local Chapters, be made a standing committee under the 
name of the "Advisory Committee on Chapters" to further consider the 
details of this plan and communicate with the several State Societies, 
and aid to the extent of their ability in that connection, with directions 
to report to the Executive Committee. when called on for such report. 

Seconded. 

Mr. Steele: The thanks of the Society are due to Dr. Parker, who 
made a very exhaustive report on this matter to the Executive Com- 
mittee and showed that he had, during all the year, worked exceedingly 
hard in getting this data. In our meeting in Chicago that we had in 
regard to this committee, his report, I am frank to say, convinced 
me on some matters to which I was absolutely antagonistic during the 
exhaustive work he has done. I almost wish to move a vote of thanks 
to him in seconding the motion of Dr. Parker. 

Seconded. 

Mr. Steele: We feel in our end of New York State, especially, that 
something should be done in regard to the reorganization of the State 



PROCEEDINGS 01? BAlvTlMORlv CONGRESS 135 

Societies and Chapters, and I trust that later on something along that 
line can be done. Commander Moore and I have talked it over a 
number of times and feel that something of that sort should be done 
to make the Chapters stronger, and possibly the suggestion that has 
been made in regard to the Presidents of the Chapters being made 
members ex officio of the State Board will do something along that line. 
I second the motion with a great deal of pleasure on account of Dr. 
Parker's splendid work in this matter. 

The President General : You have heard the motion. Arc there 
any further remarks ? 

Colonel Mack: There is one point that ought to be brought up in 
this connection in regard to Chapters. I do not know what the con- 
ditions are in other States, but in Ohio we have trouble because of 
the varying size of the territory which Chapters claim jurisdiction over. 
During my term as President of the Cleveland Society and of the 
Western Reserve Chapter I was confronted with a very serious diffi- 
culty. The Western Reserve Chapter calls itself the Western Reserve 
Society, its headquarters being in Cleveland. Originally its jurisdiction 
covered twelve counties in northern Ohio, and included, in addition to 
the city of Cleveland, such towns as Ashland, Youngstown, Ashtabula, 
and others, all of them growing cities, and my own city of Sandusky, 
also. I wished to organize a Chapter at Youngstown when I was 
President. I found that I could get 60 or 70 members there if I could 
get the proper consent to do so. I went to my Chapter and begged 
it to let me have Mahoney County. They said, "That cuts down our 
jurisdiction; we own these twelve counties of northern Ohio." Fortu- 
nately I was sustained in my appeal by my compatriot, Mr. Richardson, 
and we pushed it through and got Mahoney County set off. The result 
is that one of the most useful, most energetic Chapters in the State of 
Ohio is at Youngstown. One man in that Chapter bought and used in 
the public schools of Mahoney County 22 of these medals that have been 
struck off and about which you have heard today from this platform, 
and I regret that Mr. P.utler is not here; I expected him here and I 
think he will come some time during the day. The Youngstown boys 
said they would not go to Cleveland to Chapter meeting, 60 or 70 
miles away, and they therefore remained out of our organization. What 
can be done to limit the jurisdiction of a Chapter? In Masonic bodies, 
as many of you may know, the jurisdiction is limited, and no man within 
the jurisdiction of a lodge can apply for membership outside of it and 
no man from the outside can apply for membership in that jurisdiction. 
Now cannot we cut down the jurisdiction of Chapters to a reasonable 
amount of territory? The city of Cleveland has, with the county, 
600,000 population, and goodness alive! isn't that enough for any Chap- 
ter? And outsiders have practically no interest in the Chapter there. 
There is a Chapter at Toledo, a live Chapter. There is a population of 
almost 200,000 in that county, and it claims jurisdiction over the whole 
northwestern part of Ohio, some half dozen counties, and when I 
wanted a Chapter organized at Canton, Ohio, where we have a dozen 



i?6 



SONS OF Till; AMERICAN INVOLUTION 



or fifteen men ready to go in, the Toledo Chapter says, "That jurisdic- 
tion belongs to us." This is a very important question. The Chapter 
is the unit and the strength of the organization. The State Society is 
not. The State Society holds a meeting once a year and elects officers 
and delegates. The Chapter is working constantly every month to do 
something if it is alive, and it is the Chapter you must depend upon 
instead of the State Society. We have a hundred and odd members 
in Ohio outside of any Chapter. Why? Because there is no Chapter 
in the locality where they live. They would become members if they 
could have a Chapter of their own, but they will not go 60 or 70 miles 
to attend a Chapter meeting. 

The President General, : Dr. Parker has here a compilation of statis- 
tics in regard to which he wishes to make a brief statement. 

Dr. PARKER: The Committee has compiled in tabulated form the 
information as far as we could obtain it of the number of Chapters in 
the different Stales, the number of members belonging to the Chapters, 
the initiation fee, the life membership fee, and the annual dues, and 
copies are available for delegates who may desire them. The Colorado 
Society has recently organized the Denver Chapter, and all Colorado 
members arc now enrolled in one of the three Chapters in that State, 
at Denver, Colorado Springs, and Greeley. 



PROCEEDINGS OP LJA1/TIMORE CONGRESS 
State; v Societies and Chapthrs. 



137 



States. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dist. Columbia . . 

Florida 

France. 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi. 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire, 

New Jersey 

■New Mexico. 

New York 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . . 
Rhode Island. . . 
South Dakota.. . 
Tennessee. ..... 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington. . . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



O tn 

u 



30 
46 

27 

39S 

245 
1,059 

76 

534 
29 

15 
89 
20 

544 

161 

252 

84 

70 

83 

387 

23 1 

i,635 

378 

365 

18 

104 

41 

"3 

3°9 

396 

22 

1,328 

47' 

30 

85 

536 

301 

ro 

96 

86 

76 

2S0 

66 

203 

176 

28 

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140 



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138 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

The President General,: Compatriots who arc interested in the 
figures can obtain them from Dr. Parker. Any other remarks? All in 
favor of the adoption of the resolution for the conversion of this Special 
Committee into a Standing Committee will signify it in the usual 
manner. 

(Carried.) 

The remaining Special Committee is the Committee on Information 
for Aliens. Commander John H. Moore. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON INFORMATION FOR ALIENS. 

Commander John PL Moore, U. S. N., Chairman. 
Col. Charles Lyman. 
A. Howard Clark. 

During the year 358,529 copies of leaflet No. I have been distributed. 
The following languages were called for: Bohemian, 15,934; Croatian, 
10,150; Danish, 9,315; English, 39,779; German, 15,885; Greek, 8,635; 
Italian, 47,080; Lithuanian, 5,811; Magyar, 51,770; Polish, 98,815; 
Slovak, 7,445; Slovenian, 8,215; Swedish, 9,135; Yiddish, 30,560. 

This work has been accomplished through the aid of our different 
State Societies, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the 
Department of Commerce and Labor. Leallet No. II, "Naturalization 
of Aliens, How to Become Citizens, What is Required, Rights and 
Duties," having been approved by the Department of Commerce and 
Labor, it was printed in English and over 50,000 copies have been dis- 
tributed. 

The demand for both leaflets has been steadily increasing. A num- 
ber of our large corporations have distributed thousands among their 
workmen. They have been used extensively in the night schools of our 
larger cities, and Neighborhood Houses and Welfare Clubs have dis- 
tributed them in large numbers. 

It is to be regretted that with the change of administration the De- 
partment of Commerce and Labor will no longer publish our leaflets. 
We are greatly indebted to the Hon. T. V. Powderly, Chief of the 
Division of Information, for his hearty cooperation during the past 
year, and we will undoubtedly in the future have his support in the dis- 
tribution of our leafiets through his branch offices at labor centers. 

We can see no reason why our Society should not continue the pub- 
lication and distribution of these leaflets unaided, as it is undoubtedly 
one of the most patriotic works that our Society was organized to per- 
form. 

We do not recommend the distribution of the naturalization leaflet 
in foreign languages, as aliens to become naturalized must master our 
language to a certain degree, and supplying them with it in English will 
be only another incentive for them to study our language. 

The President General: You have heard the report of the Commit- 
tee on Information for Aliens. Without objection that report will be 
received, placed on file, and printed in the proceedings of this Congress. 
Is there objection? 

Mr. Marble: May I supplement the report of Commander Moore by 
the statement that the North German Lloyd Steamship Company carries 
the foreign leaflets on all their ships, and it is the only steamship com- 
pany bringing aliens to New York who have been willing to do so. 



i'KOCKKblNOS Ui' BAI/ilMORtf CONGRESS 139 

Mr. Richardson: We have had some experience in the distribution 
of these leaflets in Cleveland and vicinity, and the State Society at 
Columbus has also distributed some of them. I wish to call the atten- 
tion of the Congress and the members of the State Societies to the 
importance of getting in touch with the manufacturers and employers of 
labor, specially the large employers of foreign labor. I have found that 
the large manufacturing establishments in the city of Cleveland are 
perfectly willing to send their own employees to 'my office or to the 
office of the immigrant inspector in the city of Cleveland to carry away 
leaflets in such quantities as they can use practically among their em- 
ployees and a great deal of the distribution in Cleveland has been 
through the hands of the manufacturers themselves, employers of labor. 
Another matter in distribution of this information to aliens is the 
employment of the newspapers printed in a foreign tongue. We have 
in the city of Cleveland a newspaper circulating among the alien resi- 
dents or the foreign residents for almost every one of the foreign 
languages, representing in the population of Cleveland perhaps eighty 
per cent of foreign population. The editors of these newspapers printed 
in a foreign tongue arc perfectly willing to spread that entire message 
that this Society gives to the alien coming to these shores upon the 
pages of their newspapers, so we can get an enlarged distribution with- 
out costing us or anybody anything, and the editors of the foreign 
papers are very glad to get that matter, and they mention it editorially 
also, so that their people are instructed along those lines. 

Noon recess at 12.45, at which time the members repaired to the 
roof garden of the Hotel Belvedere, where an exposure was made of 
those gathered by a photographer. Luncheon was then served in the 
assembly room, after which Congress reconvened in the same room at 
2.40 p. m. 

AFTERNOON SESSION, APRIL 30. 

Chaplain GENERAL, Rev. F. O. Halt. : Thou giver of every good and 
perfect gift! We would return thanks to Thee for the benefits and 
blessings that we are constantly receiving from Thy hand. We thank 
Thee for this broad land of ours, its great rivers, fertile valleys and 
mountain chains, its mines of gold, silver and copper. We thank Th^e 
for the splendid heritage that we have received in the men of the State 
and Nation for liberty and high ideals, and we pray that Thou wilt 
make us worthy of all that we have received at Thy hands and 
through the self-sacrifices of our fathers. Grant that we may know 
Thy divine will and do what Thou wouldst have us do, and grant also 
that we may have enthusiasm to be about Our Father's business. 
Amen ! 

The PRESIDENT GENERAL: At the close of the morning session the 
report of the Committee on Information for Aliens was under considera- 
tion, and the gentleman from Pennsylvania had just been recognized. 



140 



SONS 01' Till' AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Major Yk.m.i; : Mr. President General: I simply rise for the purpose 
of emphasizing the importance of this question of immigration and to 
give a slight amount of information in reference to its interest in other 
organizations than our own. 1 attended a convention in New York on 
Monday and Tuesday of this week' where the church clubs of the 
Episcopal Church of the United States met in convention, and this ques- 
tion of immigration was one of the interesting subjects brought before 
them. While there could be no coordination of work between this 
organization and the church clubs, there could be this done: There 
could be an interchange of information which would be an advantage to 
both, and I would suggest that it would not be out of the way or out of 
order if the President General of this organization would interchange 
information with the president of the church clubs. They are working 
for the same end that we are in reference to this question of immigra- 
tion. We are looking upon it as a social and economic question and 
they are looking upon it as a religious question. Many of the most 
eminent men of New York and, in fact, from the greatest cities and 
States, where they exercise a large social, moral and civic influence, are 
members of that body, and it might lie well if as far as possible there 
could be an interchange of sentiment and information between the two 
organizations to help along this great question of immigration which, 
I believe, is becoming a great problem for the American people to solve. 
(Applause.) 

The President General: Are there any further remarks? The ques- 
tion recurs upon the motion made before the recess that the report 
presented by Commander Moore on behalf of the Committee on 
Aliens be received, placed on file, and duly printed in the minutes of 
the proceedings of this Congress. Without objection it will be so 
ordered. The Chair hears no objection and it is so ordered. The next 
of I he special committees is the Committee on Arrangements for the 
Congress for the year 1909. That Committee, gentlemen, is not quite 
ready. Tt has not quite completed its report, and asks to be excused a 
little longer. In the report of the Secretary General this morning a 
report was made of the increase of the several State Societies, especially 
in connection with the traveling banner, and a special report was made 
as bearing upon the traveling banner. T take great pleasure, therefore, 
at this time in asking Dr. Guycr, who represents the State that origin- 
ally gave this banner to the National Society and which so magnani- 
mously this morning yielded first place, to say a few words in connec- 
tion with the result of the year's work as announced by the Secretary 
General. Dr. Guycr. (Applause.) 

Dr. Cearkson N. Guyer : Tn the last political address Senator Wolcott 
made in Denver, his last words were a beautiful reference to the 
picture of Hope, sitting, as he said, upon a dark and swirling world; 
her eyes bandaged and but one star shining in the sky, holding a lute 
in her bands, all the strings broken but one, and leaning over to catch 
from that one string, some note of melody to give her courage to go on. 
It seems to me that the work and meeting of the annual Congress of the 






PROCEEDINGS 01? BAI/fl MORIS CONGRESS I4I 

Sons of the American Revolution has a ringing note of courage and 
inspiration to all members of our organization. 

1 confess, Mr. President General and Fellow Compatriots, that it 
seems in quite bad form for me to present this banner, because my 
home Society is the Colorado Society which presented it to the National 
Society. The idea of its presentation was to stimulate membership in 
our National Society. It is a pleasure to note that the banner is realiz- 
ing the purpose in the minds of its donors. The Colorado Society did 
not desire to enter the list for at least two years, but it serves notice 
now to one and all of the Slate Societies, that we shall enter the list 
after this year. You often hear it said of this and that man in Colo- 
rado, he is working on his nerve — that is literally a physical fact, and 
not a romance of sentiment. The air is thin and the heart works fast 
in Denver, and we are a mile above you ordinary mortals, but if you 
think, sir, that the increase of 37J/2 per cent is not Colorado's just share 
of the proposed new membership, we will move ourselves, bag and 
baggage, to the top of Pike's Peak, where we will be three miles high, 
and the nerves will so thrill and tingle that the Colorado Society will 
soon be the chief animating inspiration of the whole National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

I confess from former residence in Maryland that I have had a 
genuine longing to sec the beautiful monument on Mount Royal plaza 
to commemorate the valor of the Sons of Maryland in the Revolution. 
Hers was indeed a glorious part in the memorable struggle, and she 
lias just reason to be proud of the illustrious deeds of her sons. Eighty 
per cent of her whole male population between the ages of 17 and 70 
were at the front to fight from Stony Point to Savannah. Tt was, 
indeed, a just source of pride to the Colorado Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution that they had the great honor to entertain at 
the Brown in Denver a gentleman whose ancestor, Major Charles 
Alexander War field, so enlightened a certain Mr. Anthony Stewart on 
a certain October day of 1774 that scales fell from Stewart's eyes as 
from Saul's of old. The affair of the Peggy Stewart occurred six 
months before Lexington and Concord, and committed beyond recall 
Maryland to the cause of the Revolution. 

1 heartily congratulate this State Society upon winning this banner. 
You have a clean title to it. It stands for loyalty to our country, and 
love to our Society, and better incentives than these to good citizenship 
do not exist. The Romans had ibis notice conspicuously displayed be- 
fore the contestants as they entered the arena of the old Colosseum: 
"Let Him Who Wins It Bear Away the Palm." (Applause.) 

Mr. Gaithkr: Gentlemen of the Convention: I want to say on behalf 
of the Maryland Society how deeply we appreciate the eloquent words 
that have come to us from the lips of the Vice-President General from 
Colorado, and we feel especially gratified that we have won this beau- 
tiful banner, given by the Rocky Mountain State. And we want to 
say that although we realize you are a mile high, yet down here in 
Maryland, at the present, and almost always, we believe that a mile is 



I42 SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

not much of a distance to overcome. We have a few ponies out here 
that win by a nose sometimes, and that is what we try to do in Maryland 
sometimes, too. I will say to the gentlemen of this convention that our 
Society, in winning this beautiful banner and having the opportunity 
to hold it for one year, and perhaps for another — we hope that may 
be so — that our cup of joy is full to overllowing. You have given us in 
Maryland here the three highest honors that can be conferred upon any 
State. First of all, you have given us our President General. (Ap- 
plause.) Then you have done us the honor to come here this year to 
hold your National Congress, and I want to say that it was the inspira- 
tion of this Congress, of your coming here, that made the Maryland 
men and the members of our Society feel that we had something to 
work for during the past year. It has been that inspiration that has led 
us on to increase our membership during the year that is past, and I can 
say here that every member has felt the inspiration of the coming of 
this National Congress to old Maryland. Then we want to tell you 
something about tomorrow night and we hope you will discover some- 
thing about it at that time, and above all I think, on behalf of the Mary- 
land Society, we can say to you that we have a chairman on our Com- 
mittee on the Admission of Members who never sleeps or never eats 
or — even in Maryland — never drinks. (Applause.) And he — I may 
mention his name — has been more instrumental than any other man in 
building up the Society, and that is Mr. W. P. C. Cockey, the Chairman 
of our Committee on Admissions. Now, gentlemen, you have done us 
the unexpected honor of conferring upon us this flag with the colors of 
our great Society. I want to say that the inspiration that we have had 
in the past year will be nothing compared to that which we will feel 
during the coming year to see if we cannot redouble our members, and 
thereby hold on for another year to the traveling banner, and if wc 
succeed in doing that, gentlemen, we will owe it to the fact of the 
assemblage here of such a splendid body of citizens as are assembled 
in this convention today, which, with the public spirit and the public mis- 
sion of our Society, will give us hope and the opportunity that Maryland 
during the coming year may prove herself not only the worthy holder 
but also the worthy possessor for another year of this beautiful banner. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Guthrie: Will you allow me just a moment? I should like to 
ask the delegates of this convention to rise in their seats and second 
me in three cheers for Maryland. (Done.) 

The President General : The next business in order is the reports 
of the State Societies. Mr. Clark. 

Mr. Dewey: This is practically the same as has been published in 
the Official Bulletin, is it not, largely? 

Mr. Clark: Largely so. 

Mr. Dewey: I move that the reading be suspended. 

Seconded. 

The President General: You hear the motion of Mr. £)ewey, of 



PROCEEDINGS Ol' liAI/riMORK CONGRESS 143 

Vermont, which has been duly seconded, that the reading of the various 
State reports be suspended, and that the Secretary General be author- 
ized to publish the usual digest of them in the volume of the proceed- 
ings of this Congress. 
Carried. 

REPORTS OF STATE SOCIETIES. 

The Secretary General: The doings of State Societies during the 
year have been published in the several numbers of the Official Bul- 
letin, so that it is not as necessary as in past years to again record the 
items in detail in the National Year Book. Statistical statements, giv- 
ing by name all changes in the rolls, have been filed by thirty of the 
States. The following special accounts of work accomplished have been 
submitted to the Congress by the Secretaries of the respective Societies : 

CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

The Connecticut Society numbers 1,059 members, which includes the 
j6 new members that have been admitted since May 10, 1908. 

Seven meetings of the Board of Managers have been held during the 
year, with good attendance and great interest shown in the proceedings. 

The graves of many Revolutionary soldiers and sailors have been 
marked with the Society marker during the year. 

The most interesting work the coming year will be the erection of a 
monument on the spot where General Tryon landed the British troops 
on his raid on Danbury. Designs are being prepared in New York by 
a celebrated artist, and will soon be submitted to the Board of Man- 
agers for approval. 

A Field Day was held at Savin Rock on July 16th on account of it 
being near the spot where the British troops were landed on their raid 
on New Haven. This Field Day was arranged so that all the members 
of the Connecticut Society could get better acquainted with each other. 
It was largely attended, and all enjoyed the excellent shore dinner that 
was served and addresses that were made after the dinner. A male 
quartette furnished the music and led the members in the singing of 
patriotic airs. 

The Society held its annual banquet at the Hotel Stratfield, in Bridge- 
port, on Washington's Birthday, and was attended by over 275 mem- 
bers. President Lewis B. Curtis, of the Connecticut Society, acted as 
toastmaster. The other speakers were President General Henry Stock- 
bridge, of the National Society; Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, former 
President General of the National Societv; Mayor Lee, of Bridgeport; 
Horn Job E. Hedges, of New York, and Rev. Watson L. Phillips, D. D., 
of New Haven. 

On April 14th the Gen. David Humphreys branch, of New Haven, 
gave a reception to the members and the D. A. R. of New Haven, 
Derby, Ansonia, and New Mil ford. 

The Society feels very proud of its increase in 76 new members, and 
hopes to add enough to make up the 100 at its annual meeting on 
May 10th. 

Ciiarlks G. Stone, Secretary. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCTETY. 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the District of 
Columbia Society for the year ending April 30, 1909: 



144 SONS 01* TlIK AMERICAN RUVOI/UTION 

The District of Columbia Society, for the size of the territory from 
which it has to draw, continues to flourish, with a total enrollment of 
534 members, all in active good standing. Forty-seven members were 
elected during the year. There occurred eleven deaths, among which 
should be mentioned Rear Admiral Charles Mitchell Thomas, a life 
member of this Society, and General Van H. Bukey. 

The Society has held eight meetings since the last National Congress, 
three of which were of a special character. In May the Society joined 
with the Society of Mayflower Descendants in a river trip and Potomac 
"shad bake" to historic Marshall Hall, on the banks of the Potomac 
opposite Mount Vernon. The January meeting, following the custom 
of a number of years, took the form of a "ladies' night," to which were 
invited relatives and friends of members. Addresses were delivered by 
Mr. Justice Thomas H. Anderson, President of this Society, and by the 
Presidents General of the Sons of the American Revolution and the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, followed by a reception and a 
dance. The April meeting, at the time of the Continental Congress of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution in Washington, was in honor 
of the visiting delegates of that Society. President Edward B. Moore, 
Senator Robert L. Owen, of Oklahoma, and the President General of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution spoke on patriotic subjects. 
At the regular meetings during the year patriotic addresses were de- 
livered by Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, Hon. John Barrett, Director of the 
International Bureau of American Republics, and Dr. William S.Wash- 
burn, Director of Civil Service for the Philippine Islands. 

The Society was represented in the ceremonies relative to the re- 
moval of the remains of General De Witt Clinton from the Congress- 
ional Cemetery to Kingston, N. Y., in the spring of 1908; in the services 
at the interment at Arlington November 5, 190S, of General James 
Maccubin Lingan, and in the ceremonies in the Capitol and at Arlington 
incident to the removal of the remains of Major Pierre Charles L'En- 
fant from Green Hill, Maryland, to Arlington, April 28, 1909. 

The Society also participated, as usual, in the annual New Year's 
reception of the President of the United States. 

Through its Flag Committee the Society has been active in its efforts 
to secure National legislation relative to the desecration of the Ameri- 
can flag, and it also took action endorsing the proposed change of the 
name of Sixteenth Street, running north from the White House, to 
Lafayette Avenue. 

Such efforts as were possible were made by the Society through its 
out-of-town members in the formation of new Societies in South Caro- 
lina, Georgia, and elsewhere. 

The prospects for a fruitful year in 1909-1910 are bright. 

Chester M. Clark, Secretary. 

ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

The usual custom of making an appropriation for the purchase of 
patriotic statuettes for schools in the city has been carried out, and four 
schools were supplied with statuettes during the year. 

An appropriation was made toward the erection of a monument on 
the grave of the Rev. James Lemcn, to be erected in the cemetery at 
Lcmcn's Crossing, Monroe County, Illinois. This work is in charge of 
the Baptists of the State of Illinois. 

A report, which will appear elsewhere, shows the number of new 
admissions during the year; also deaths and losses by demit, resigna- 
tion, and otherwise. 

The most important work carried on by the Society during the past 
year has been the distribution of the Immigration and Naturalization 



PROCEEDINGS 01« BALTIMORE CONGRESS 1 45 

leaflets. These leaflets have been distributed to the settlements and 
various park clubs connected with the public parks of Chicago, the 
various foreign associations, and through the large manufacturing cor- 
porations. In the neighborhood of 120,000 copies in all have been 
distributed. 

The Society has held four regular quarterly meetings during the 
year and one banquet, and the Board of Managers has met once each 
month, except during the months of July and August. 

The Society has also amended its Constitution and By-Laws to eon- 
form to the National Society's Constitution. 

The Society maintains its library at 135 Adams Street, Chicago, for 
the use of its members and those contemplating joining. 

A proposition is under consideration for the exhibition of Revolu- 
tion and Colonial relics sonic time during the coming winter, and in 
connection with the other patriotic and hereditary societies in Illinois. 

The Society took part through its members in the Lincoln Memorial 
celebration, held in Chicago on the one hundredth anniversary of the 
birthday of Abraham Lincoln. 

The growth of the Society has been satisfactory, although there has 
been a considerable loss from death, transfer, and other causes during 
the year. 

John D. Vandercook, Secretary. 

LOUISIANA. SOCIETY. 

New members have been admitted into our State Society to the 
number of eight since my last report. 

The Society has marked the graves of Revolutionary soldiers in old 
Saint Louis Cemetery in New Orleans. Two of these veterans fought 
under the chivalric Don Bernardo de Galvez, in his campaign against 
the British, at Manchac, Natchez, and Baton Rouge, in 1780-81, and 
one in the army of gallant Rochambeau at Yorktown. All three were 
of the bluest blood and true patriots, and well deserved the humble 
tribute we paid them when we planted before their resting-place the 
simple testimonial of recognition of patriotism, valor, and fortitude 
displayed at a time which tried men's souls. 

On the 1 st of November, following "All Saints' Day," we continued 
our good work by placing a wreath on the tomb of each of these heroes 
and strewed their graves with flowers. I had hoped to write you an 
interesting and enthusiastic story of a royal celebration of Washington's 
Birthday, as usual, by our Society this year; but I regret to say that I 
found, after holding out as long as possible, that the spirit of the 
carnival, Vivimus Viviamnus, was stronger for the once than our 
slogan, Libcrtas ct P atria', so I called the commemoration dinner oil. 
The natal day of the Lather of his Country, unfortunately, this year 
fell on the eve of Mardi Gras, the pr'niia primarin of social and tem- 
poral holidays in light-hearted, gay, and hospitable old New Orleans. 
The result was like; the guest in the parable of the Marriage Feast — a 
large majority of our compatriots begged, for various reasons, to be 
excused. 

Owing to the fact that the day we celebrate at present falls too fre- 
quently in the "sackcloth-and-ashes" season of the year, we are thinking 
seriously of changing the date of our anniversary to commemorate some 
important event in American history associated with the Revolutionary 
War other than Washington's Birthday. We believe this departure 
will be a popular one and please all concerned. 

Medals and certificate have been conferred by the National Society 
on three compatriots for their service in the War with Spain in 1898— 



1 46 



SONS < 



'I'll 



AMKRICAN 



H.I.'TION 






Capt. Emmit L. Kkld, of Ruston, La.; Col. Elmer E. Wood, command- 
ing 2d Louisiana Volunteers, and Col. Stephen M. Foote, U. S. A., 
aide-de-camp in the Army of Santiago. 

Thomas Dabney Djmitky, Secretary. 






MA SSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

Total membership April 1, 1908 1,585 

Accessions — 

Admission by election T20 

Transferred from other States • 2 

Reinstated 6 

Total accessions 128 

Losses — 

Deaths 30 

Resignations 13 

Transfers 7 

Forfeitures 28 

Losses 78 

Gain 50 

Total membership March 31, 1909 1,635 

Out of the twelve actual sons, we have lost two by death during the 
past year, viz., Tsaac Newton Day, of South Hadley, and James F. 
Edwards, of Toledo, Ohio. 

Three meetings of the Society have been held during the past year 
and ten meetings of the Board of Managers. 

The annual election of officers took place April 20, 1908, and the 
Hon. Edward C. Battis, of Salem, was elected President and reelected 
April 19, 1909. At this meeting the Society voted to increase the sum 
previously appropriated towards the amount required to build one of 
the "Bays" in the "Cloister of the Colonies" of the Washington Memo- 
rial Church at Valley Forge, which, together with $950 contributed by 
members of the Society, makes the $2,000 needed to complete it. 

Again our Society used its influence in protestation to the city gov- 
ernment against changing the name of historic Maverick Square, in 
East Boston, to Doherty Square, as was proposed by the Common 
Council. This square took its name from Samuel Maverick, the first 
settler on the island, which is now East Boston. He built the first of 
the many forts erected for the protection of the settlers against the 
Indians. He .and another owned what is now Chelsea, and sold it to 
Richard Bellingham in 163.4. lie was a Royal Commissioner in 1664, 
and had dwelt in New England since the first plantation. 

On October 17, 1008, the Society celebrated tin.' anniversary of the 
surrender of Burgoyne by a patriotic meeting and dinner at the Ameri- 
can House, Boston. The Society listened to an historical address by Rev. 
Frederick W. Hamilton, President of Tufts College, on the causes of 
the Revolution and of the events which led to Burgoync's surrender, 
October 17, 1777. 

Hon. Edward C. Battis, President of the Society, presided, and 
Nathan Warren spoke of the old custom of celebrating "Cornwallis 
Day" by sham battles. Edwin Day Sibley entertained the company with 
selections from his dialect anecdotes and stories. 



PROCEEDINGS OP BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



147 



November 1, 1908, the Society removed its office to 17 Milk Street, 
Boston. The building is situated on the site of the house in which 
Benjamin Franklin was born. 

The Board of Managers adopted resolutions expressive of the desire 
of the Society that historic Fort McHenry, Baltimore, should be main- 
tained as a garrisoned fort of the United States Army, and sent the 
same to the Secretary of War and to the Massachusetts .Members of 
Congress. 

The subject of identifying and marking the graves of Revolutionary 
soldiers and sailors of Massachusetts was brought to the attention of 
such town officials as had not already placed markers, by means of a 
circular of information sent to the Selectmen. The result has. been 
that Middlebo.ro, Warren, and other towns have made appropriations 
of money for this purpose. 

The George Washington Chapter, of Springfield, invited the Massa- 
chusetts Society to celebrate the annual observance of Washington's 
Birthday in that city, instead of in Boston, as has long been the custom. 
John C. Robinson, Vice-President of George Washington Chapter, was 
toastmaster at the banquet. The speakers were: lion. A. S. Roc, of 
Worcester; John Adams, of Gardner, who is nearly ninety-five years 
old and an "Actual Sun" of the American Revolution; lion. Edward C. 
Battis, President of the Stale organization of the Sons of the American 
Revolution; Rev. John S. Lyon, D. D., of Holyoke, and Hon. Solon W. 
Stevens, of Lowell. 

Herbert W. Kimbaix, Secretary. 

MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

The last annual meeting of the Michigan Society was held on April 
15, 1909, at the Hotel Ponchartrain, in Detroit, when the work of the 
year was fully reviewed in elaborate reports from the different ofiicers 
and committees, and officers were elected for the coming year. The 
year just closed was one of growth and prosperity for the Society; 37 
new members have been received, and 17 members lost, making a net 
gain of 20 members, and a total active membership of 378. 

A number of meetings have been held during the past year, beginning 
with one held on May 8th last at the Hotel Ponchartrain, when inter- 
esting historical papers were read, reports received from the delegates 
to the Buffalo Congress, and new committees appointed. Through the 
summer no meetings were held, but on October 16th occurred the first 
meeting of the yearly series, arranged by the Program Committee. This 
was a smoker, held at the Hotel Ponchartrain, and contributed many 
entertaining features. Since that time our work has been carried on 
largely through the Historical Section, which was given its first start by 
the late Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. P., who was for several years the 
very efficient President of the Michigan Society. Historical meetings 
were held on November 27th, January 29th, and March 26th in Detroit, 
at the residences of different compatriots of the Society. According to 
our usual custom, papers were prepared and read by different members, 
usually from historical subjects, and general discussions followed. 

The annual bancpiet of the Society was held on Washington's Birth- 
day, at the Hotel Ponchartrain, and was attended by about 150 mem- 
bers and guests. The occasion was somewhat different from tin 1 ban- 
quets of the past, for the reason that ladies for the first time attended. 
The program was as follows: 

Mr. Charles E. Baxter, Toastmaster; addresses, ''Washington, the 
Patriot," by Hon. James O. Murfin; "Washington, the Soldier," by 
Hon. H. A. Locl;wood; "Washington, the Statesman," by Hon. John B. 
Corliss; "Washington, the Exemplar," by Rev. Lee S. McCollester. 



148 



SONS OF- TNiv AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



This banquet was considered one of the most successful that the So- 
ciety has ever given. 

The Michigan Society was honored by the selection of one of its 
members, Mr. George Williams Bates, as Vice-President General of the 
National- Society. 

Ten meetings of the Board of Managers have been held during the 
year, and a great amount of routine business transacted. The finances 
of the Society are in good condition, and there is a substantial balance 
in the treasury. 

The question of Chapters has been considerably discussed, and it is 
hoped that the coming year will see the establishment of several Chap- 
ters through tlie State. The Western Michigan Chapter, with head- 
quarters at Grand Rapids, has now some thirty or mure members, and 
they are exerting themselves to form a stronger and larger organization 
with good prospects of success. 

Our Societv met with a severe loss in January last, in the death of 
Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D., our former President, who always took a 
very strong interest in the Society and contributed a great deal toward 
its prosperity. 

As a result of the interest manifested by our members, Michigan 
Society will this year send to the Baltimore Congress its full quota of 
delegates. 

Wimjams C. Harris, Secretary. 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

The Montana Society has lost one member during the past year by 
demission, and gained one, so that at present the entire membership is 
41. The compatriots are scattered over a vast region, and while they 
are not always able to attend the meetings they maintain an active 
interest in the work of the Sociely. The annual meeting was held at the 
residence of the President, James Upson Sanders, the home of the late 
Col. W. F. Sanders, Montana's most noted pioneer and statesman. A 
banquet and speeches enlivened the evening. The following were the 
toasts and speakers: "The Retiring President," Robert PI. Howey ; 
"Unknown Pleroes," Iiarry B. Palmer; "Our Country's Problems," 
Oliver T. Crane; "Forgotten Statesmen," Edward C. Rnssel ; "Pioneer 
Spirit," William A. Chessman; "Building the Society," Frank M. 
Smith ; "Washington," many of the compatriots made short speeches 
and Orin T. Walker read a poem on this hero; "Historical Reminis- 
cences," Henry N. Blake; "Absent Ones," Leslie Sulgrove; "New Ad- 
ministration," Charles J. Brackett. 

A resolution was adopted offering a silk flag to the member of the 
senior class of the High Schools in the State who should produce an 
essay upon a selected patriotic subject, the flag to become the property 
of the victorious school. 

Strong efforts will he made during this year to increase the member- 
ship, and a large number of applications are expected before the next 
meeting. Secretary Sulgrove was commended for his efforts in gaining 
for the Sociely a more extended recognition throughout the country 
generally, and for materially assisting in advancing in local publicity the 
name and fame of the Society's work by his very full reports, which 
have been published in the daily papers and copies sent to all of the 
various State Societies and Chapters. 

The Society has assisted in patriotic work by helping the D. A. R. 
raise a fund to restore the famous pioneer military post, old Fort Ben- 
ton. The Sociely has been instrumental in having a law passed requir- 
ing the National Flag to float over the State House grounds, as there 
cannot be a staff placed on the building, and a large pole has been 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS I40 

erected and the flag was flung to the breeze as soon as possible after 
the act was passed. 

The leaflets concerning the immigrants have been distributed, and the 
National Society's annual report is read with care and much discussed. 

Flag Day is announced by proclamation of the Governor, and receives 
a great deal of attention from the school children. 

Fourth of July is celebrated with enthusiasm, and the compatriots 
always turn out in full force and take part in all of the parades and 
ceremonies. Last Fourth of July the parade was the fitting end of a 
grand carnival lasting four days, at which were present thousands of 
people from all over this big State, and they saw, many of them for the 
first time, the Society's banners, and gave these rousing salutes as they 
fluttered by in the brilliant sunshine. 

The compatriots of the Society are frequently called upon to address 
local bodies upon historical subjects, and on last February 12th, Lin- 
coln's centenary, Judge Henry N. Blake delivered a notable lecture 
before the students of the Catholic High School. The Society was in- 
vited to take a prominent part in the exercises during the day at a large 
public meeting, and a number attended the session at the public High 
School, which was a very patriotic affair all through. 

The Society has been the means of securing the passage of the 
"Desecration Act," and this has been for some time rigidly enforced. 
There have been quite a few offenders, but in every case when ap- 
proached regarding the matter those violating the law have been fair 
in their actions and have always strived to uphold the honor of the Flag 
when their offense was pointed out. 

This law is somewhat different from the acts that have been quoted 
in the general report, and as it is very strict, and we think complete, it 
is given here entire for the benefit of those who wish to combine all of 
the good points in the next act to be passed in some of the States that 
are still behind in this matter, and to show all of our compatriots that 
Montana keeps in the van in patriotic movements. 

"An Act to prevent and punish the desecration of the Flag of the 
United States. 

"Section f. That any person who in any manner for exhibition or 
display, shall place or cause to be placed any word, figure, mark, pic- 
ture, design, drawing, or any advertisement of any nature upon any 
flag, standard, color, or ensign of the United States of America, or 
shall expose, or cause to be exposed to public view any such flag, 
standard, color, or ensign upon which shall be printed, painted, or 
otherwise placed, or to which shall be attached, appended, affixed, or 
annexed, any word, figure, mark, picture, design, or drawing, or any 
advertisement of any nature, or who shall expose to public view, or 
manufacture, sell, expose for sale, give away, or have in possession for 
sale, or to give away, or for use for any purpose, any article or sub- 
stance, being any article of merchandise or receptacle of merchandise, 
upon which shall have been printed, painted, attached, or otherwise 
placed, a representation of any such flag, standard, color, or ensign to 
advertise, call attention to, decorate, mark, or distinguish the article or 
substance on which so placed, or who shall publicly mutilate, defile, or 
defy, trample upon, or cast contempt upon, either by words or act, 
upon any such flag, standard, color, or ensign shall be deemed guilty of 
a misdemeanor, and shall be punished by a fine not exceeding one hun- 
dred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than thirty days, or 
both in the discretion of the court. 

''Section. 2. That the words flag, standard, color, or ensign, as used 
in this act, shall include any ling, standard, color, ensign, or any picture 
or representation of either thereof, made of any substance or rcpre- 



150 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN RICVOIVUTION 

sentcd.on any substance, and of any size evidently purporting to be said 
Hag', standard, color, or ensign of the United States of America; or a 
picture, or representation of either thereof, upon which shall be shown 
the colors, the stars, and the stripes in any number or either thereof, 
or by which the person seeing the same without deliberation may be- 
lieve the same to represent the flag, standard, color, or ensign of the 
United States of America. 

"Section 3. That this act shall not apply to any act permitted by the 
Statutes of the United States of America, or by the United States Army 
and Navy regulations, nor shall it be construed to apply to a newspaper, 
periodical, book, pamphlet, circular, certificate, diploma, warrant, or 
commission of appointment to office, ornamental picture, or stationery 
for use in correspondence, on any of which shall be printed, painted, or 
placed said flag, disconnected from any advertisement." 

Lksuh Suu-rovE, Secretary. 

NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

I report on behalf of the Nebraska Society, that an important work 
has been initiated among the youth of Nebraska: 

(1) In an essay contest between the High Schools of Omaha and 
Lincoln on the subject, "Why Did the Revolution Succeed?" in which 
there were over 200 contestnnts. The prize winners from the two 
schools were given prizes, offered by the Society, in an appropriate 
program at the Omaha High School on the Friday preceding Washing- 
ton's Birthday. 

(2) On April 19, in every school-house in Nebraska an address was 
either given orally or read by the teachers on "The Battle of Lexington 
and Its Lesson." A copy of the address sent out under the auspices of 
the Society, is herewith submitted. It is believed that the patriotic 
sentiments thus inculcated will yield a full harvest. The two events, 
the essay contest and the general observance of the anniversary of 
Lexington, will be repeated annually. 

Ralph W. Breckinridge, President. 

NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. . 

The work of the Society has been one of unflagging zeal in the 
patriotic purpose for which it was created. 

Much lias been accomplished by the Board of Managers and the 
Executive Officers, to further the objects of the Society, that the public 
generally is not familiar with. 

During the year the Board of Managers held four meetings, viz.: 
On February Oth, April 28th, July 1st, and November 24th, for the con- 
sideration of, and acting upon, the detail work of the Society; passing 
upon the applications for membership and the election of those found 
eligible. 

On February 6th the Board of Managers received and accepted an 
invitation from the New Jersey Society of the "Sons of the Revolution" 
to unite with it and other patriotic societies, in the celebration of 
Washington's Birthday, at Trenton. The invitation was at once ex- 
tended to the members of our Society, which a number accepted and 
took part in the very interesting exercises held in the historic First 
Presbyterian Church, and in the assembly chamber at the Slate House, 
where an elaborate program of patriotic exercises was held. A most 
enjoyable reunion of the descendants of the men and women of '76 
was had. 

On the same day President Fort met with and delivered an address 



proceedings ui' Baltimore; congress 151 

before the Connecticut Society, ''Sons of the American Revolution;" so, 
too, the meeting' of the Washington Headquarters Association, and the 
projected exercises of Orange Chapter, prevented the attendance, at 
Trenton, of many of our members who would otherwise have been with 
us on that occasion. 

Early in March the "Old Tavern" Association, of Haddonfield, asked 
the Society to assist it in obtaining from the Legislature an appropria- 
tion to preserve this historic building; by direction of the President the 
Secretary immediately interviewed the members of the Appropriation. 
Committee of the Legislature, and is gratified to report that the appro- 
priation sought for was obtained, and made immediately available for 
the purpose. 

The "Old Sow" monument, erected by the Society on Ilobart Hill,. 
Summit, was placed on ground to which no legal title had been secured; 
the sale of the land and the erection thereon of a dwelling, compelled 
the removal of the monument; a committee was appointed to confer 
with and arrange with Air. Thombly (the present owner) for a site as- 
near the original location as possible; the committee agreed with Mr, 
Thombly and his wife (both of whom are descendants of Revolutionary 
ancestors), to have the boulder incorporated with and made part of the 
retaining wall of the property; it was so removed and the Board of 
Managers ordered a bronze plate to be placed on it bearing the follow- 
ing inscription : 

************************ 

* * 

* 1776 * 

* Here in the Time of the American Revolution Stood * 
^ THE Signal, Beacon, and dy its Side the Cannon Known 

as THE "Old Sow," which in the time of Danger and 

* Invasion Summoned the Patriotic "Minute Men" of * 
^ this Vicinity to the Defense of the Country and the 

REPUESE OF the Invader. 

* 1896 * 

This Monument was Erected dy the New Jersey 

* Society of the Sons of the American Revolution * 
and Dedicated to the Memory of the Patriots of New 

T * 

JERSEY. 

* :o: * 

Removed to tins Spot from its Original Location and 

* Re-Dedicated Jui.y .pni, 1908. * 

* * 
************************' 



In addition to this tablet, Mr. Thombly has had a bronze plate in- 
serted in the floor of the house showing by an appropriate inscription 
the exact location of the "Old Sow." He has also restored and pre- 
served the old military road leading to the site of the signal beacon. 

Both of the Chapters, Elizabcthtown and Orange, have been quite 
active. The Orange Chapter held a commemorative service on Sunday, 
April 26th, of the Battle of Lexington, at which your officers and some 
of the members were present. A program of exercises of a patriotic 
and appropriate character Was carried out to the enjoyment and profit 
of all who had the privilege of being present. 



152 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

The anniversary of the Declaration of Independence was appropriately 
observed by both Chapters. 

Upon the invitation of the Fort Lee Monument Association the 
Society took part in the dedication ceremonies, at the monument, on 
September 26th. A large number of our members was present. The 
address was delivered by our President, who, as Governor of the State, 
was accompanied by his military stat'f, and, as President, by the officers 
of this Society. The program of exercises was an elaborate one, pre- 
ceded by a parade of United States regular troops, National Guard of 
New Jersey, and civic societies, and by the presence of a United States 
naval vessel, stationed in close proximity, to fire the National salute. 
The monument is a characteristic one, very beautiful in design, and 
adds another lasting memorial to the important part Jerseymen played 
in the days of the Revolution. 

The monument at Greenwich, to the memory of "The Jersey Tea 
Burners," was completed and dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. 
The monument to mark the battlefield of Princeton is now in process 
of erection, all the funds necessary for the purpose having been obtained 
through appropriations by the National and State governments, and 
through private subscriptions obtained by the Princeton Battle Monu- 
ment Association. Your Trustee, Hon. Franklin Murphy, has given 
largely of his time, influence, and means to this end, and the thanks of 
this Society — and all patriotic citizens — is due him for his active work 
in this connection. 

The Shade Tree Commission of the city of Newark requested the 
cooperation of the Society in placing a tablet on the flagstaff in Military 
Park to denote that said park was used during the Revolution as a 
training ground for the Essex County militia. After an exhaustive 
search of the records by your Registrar, correspondence with the New 
Jersey Historical Society, and a subsequent examination of the files 
of the newspapers of the period by William Nelson, Esq., it was deter- 
mined that the park was never so used, nor any other place in Newark, 
and the Commission informed that a strict regard for historical accu- 
racy prevented this Society from taking any steps to perpetuate a 
tradition not founded on fact. 

The edition of "The Patriotic Poems of New Jersey," was received 
early in the year, a copy sent to each member of the Society, to the 
holders of copyrights, officers of other patriotic societies, and some 
copies sold to the public. 

A large number of the leaflets entitled "Instructions for Immigrants," 
published in the several foreign languages by the National Society, were 
received and distributed with the assistance of Miss Maude Campbell, 
Librarian of the Passaic Public Library, who entered heartily and 
thoroughly in the work, giving invaluable assistance to your Secretary 
and Registrar. 

James R. Mui.ukin, Secretary. 

EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

Total membership April 1, 190S 1,280 

Admissions and reinstated 121 

Losses by death, etc 73 

Total membership April 1, 1900 1,328 

Active 1,284 

Inactive 38 

Honorary 6 

Total 1,328 



PROCEEDINGS OP BALTIMORE CONGRES: 



1 53 



Three meetings of the Society have been held during the past year 
and nine meetings of the Board of Managers. The annual election of 
officers took place April 21, iqoS, at which time the Hon. Cornelius A. 
Pugsley, ex-President General of the National Society, was .elected 
President. 

The Society sent a complete delegation to the Congress of the Na- 
tional Society which was held at Buffalo, N. Y., on April 30 and May I, 
1908. 

At the meeting of the Society held April 21, 190S, the sum of five 
hundred dollars was appropriated for the purpose of aiding the Buffalo 
Chapter to entertain the delegates to the National Society Congress, 
of which sum three hundred dollars were returned as not needed. 

At this meeting the Rev. D. C. Hughes, D. D., father of Compatriot 
Governor Charles F. Hughes, read a paper entitled "The American 
Revolution, the Genesis of the World's Progress," which was published 
in our Year Book for rgoS. 

Resolutions were passed thanking the retiring President, Mr. William 
A. Marble, for his activity, during the three years he had held the office, 
for the welfare of the Society, many times at much inconvenience to 
himself. 

At the meeting held October 20, rgoS, resolutions were passed thank- 
ing Mrs. Russell Sage and Miss Anna Bartlett Warner for their most 
magnificent gift of Constitution Island to the United States for the 
use of the United States Military Academy; also a resolution of thanks 
to Mr. J. P. Morgan for his offer to donate to the State of New York 
a piece of property in exchange for the site of old Forts Clinton and 
Montgomery, that these might be preserved in their present state as 
historic landmarks too sacred to be used as a prison site. 

On February 16th a meeting of the Society was held at the Waldorf- 
Astoria. The Rev. Samuel H. Virgin, D. D., the first Chaplain of the 
Society, and Mr. Lorenzo Oviatt, a real son, were proposed for honor- 
ary membership. 

The compatriots and friends were entertained with an illustrated 
lecture by Mr. William F. Flint on Abraham Lincoln. 

On the evening of Sunday, February 21, 1009, our regular church 
service was held at the Calvary Methodist Fpi^copal Church, Seventh 
Avenue and T20th Street, of which our Chaplain, Rev. Charles L. 
Goodcll, D. D., is the pastor. 

February 25, 1900, the annual banquet of the Society was held at the 
Waldorf-Astoria, at which about three hundred ladies and gentlemen 
were present. Addresses were made by President General Henry 
Stockbridge, Hon. William A. Prendergast, Rev. John Wesley Hill, 
D. D„ Rev. Frank Oliver Hall, D. D., ex-Governor Lucius F. C. Garvin, 
of Rhode Island, and Mrs. Donald McLean, President General of the 
Daughters oi the American Revolution. President Pugsley acted as 
toastmaster. These addresses will be printed in our Year Book for 1901). 

The Society has sent representatives to many banquets given by sister 
societies during the winter. 

During the year two new Chapters have been formed, one at Hunt- 
ington and one at Painted Post, making the number now fourteen. 

Historian Tosiah C. Pumpelly, A. M., LL. B., was directed to write 
a letter to Mr. Tames Gordon Bennett, asking that he donate to the 
State his property, on which is the site of Fort Washington, as a public 
park, that it may be preserved from the encroaching march of improve- 
ment so general now in that neighborhood. 

Invitation has been received from the Hudson-Fulton Celebration 
Committee that the Society take part in the exercises next September, 
and a committee has been appointed to that end. 

Portraits of Washington have been presented to the high school at 



154 SOX'S 01- Tin: AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Amcnia, N. Y.,' the high school at Painted Post, N. Y., Mt. Pleasant 
Academy, at Ossining, X. Y., Columbia University, New York Univer- 
sity, and Solvay High School, at Syracuse. 

Several thousand of the pamphlets, "Information for .Immigrants," 

have been distributed by the Society during the year. 

Louis Annin AmES, Secretary. 

Old 10 SOCIETY. 

The annual meeting of the Ohio Society was held at Memorial Hall, 
Columbus, Ohio, on the 19th of April, 1909. 

President 11. P. Ward called the meeting to order at 2 o'clock. 

President Ward submitted his report verbally. He reviewed the work 
of the Society for the past year, calling attention to the efforts of the 
State officers to revive the Chapters at Xcnia, Newark, Kenton, and 
Cincinnati, and of the effort to establish new Chapters at Springfield, 
Dayton, Marietta, Gambier, and Oberlin. fie expressed the hope that 
the newly-elected President would take up the work where it had been 
left off and accomplish something more definite. 

S. G. Harvey, Treasurer, then submitted his report. His books showed 
a ualance on band of $866.96, which did not include the life-membership 
fund of $450. I lis report showed that the names of eighty-seven of 
the compatriot's had been dropped from the rolls of the Society for 
non-payment of dues, the Constitution providing for such action, leav- 
ing 437 present active members. 

He reported further that the Simon-Kenton Chapter, of Kenton, had 
requested that their charter be revoked. 

The report of Hugh Huntington, Registrar, showed that there were 
forty-six new members taken into the Society during the past year, the 
Benjamin Franklin Chapter, of Columbus, having furnished the largest 
number of any Chapter, which number was seventeen. The number 
who have joined the Society since it was founded in 1899 has reached 
nine hundred and forty-six. 

The report further showed that they had lost four members by death 
during the last year. 

The Registrar called attention to the fact that the records of the 
Society plainly show that our sources of strength are the local Chapters, 
and the Society was urged to give all encouragement possible to the 
local Chapters. 

The Registrar recommended that a legislative committee from this 
Society be appointed to secure a sufficient appropriation from the Gen- 
eral Assembly to enable the State Librarian to keep the library open- 
to the public in the evenings and on Sundays. 

The report of the Historian, Col. W. L. Curry, was then submitted. 
He had prepared memorials for the following-named compatriots wdio 
had died during the past year: George Dunlap Potts, John Austin 
Woods, John Thomas Sutphen, and Cooper Fenimore McBride. 

After remarks by Gen. J. M. Richardson, on the education of for- 
eigners, the meeting proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing 
year. 

The Society recessed to 6:30 p, m. to attend the annual dinner at the 
Columbus Club, which was attended by seventy members of the Society 
and ten invited guests. Among the guests were Hon. Edwin Warficld, 
ex-Governor of Maryland; Hon. William T. Spear, and William Z. 
Davis, of the Ohio Supreme Court. 

Hugh Huntington, Secretary. 



PROCJSJvl^I-NCia Off UAl/TlMORff, CONCRKSS I 55 

PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

tn submitting my annual report to the Society, I am glad to be able 
to slate that in no year in its history lias the Society been mure active 
in practical work and individual interest. This is shown by the number 
of accessions which we have had— there have been about forty-five new 
members added, which is a greater number than in any other year 
except 1901 — the year of our National Congress in Pittsburg. In view 
of the continued financial depression, together with the fact that social 
organizations among men base greatly increased in the past few years, 
I feel that the Society has every reason to be congratulated upon its 
work during the past year and its substantial gain in membership. 

At the suggestion of several compatriots, a series of luncheons were 
given, having in view the promotion of social intercourse among the 
members, the lack of which bad been the cause of considerable com- 
plaint in past years. The first one was given at Hotel Lincoln roof 
garden at noon September nth last, to which the members responded to 
the number of fifty-four. All present were most enthusiastic and en- 
dorsed the movement most heartily. On September 25th a second one 
was given at McCreery's cafe with about forty-live members present, 
which was equally enjoyable. A third luncheon was given on October 
30th, at the same place with thirty-six members present. At all of these 
gatherings a number of new members were present, and were thus en- 
abled to meet the compatriots in a social way at once upon their admis- 
sion to the Society. The fourth meeting was held November 24th at 
6 p. m., at the Monongabela House, when fifty members sat down to an 
excellent supper at a cost of but seventy cents each. The guest of 
honor upon the occasion was Mr. Peter V. Rovianek, who gave us a 
most interesting address upon the subject of "The emigration to this 
country of his own race — The Slovaks." Mr. Rovianek spoke most 
interestingly of this people and his remarks elicited the greatest en- 
thusiasm as he enlightened those present with statistics in such a con- 
vincing manner that they called forth responses from Colonel Lindsay,. 
Clerk of the United States Court, and Mr. R. C. Hall, both of whom 
spoke at considerable length along the same line. The meeting was 
successful beyond the expectation of the Board and resulted in practical 
steps being taken for the amelioration of the condition of foreigners in 
our midst. We hope to continue these mid-day luncheons during the 
coming year, and we hope that you will make an effort to respond in 
person when the notice is sent you. 

Our Philadelphia Chapter is in a very flourishing condition as is the 
New Castle Chapter also. 

During the year. markers were placed on the graves of seven Revolu- 
tionary soldiers, and just here I am glad to be able 1o state that the 
United States Government, through the War Department, lias notified 
us that they will furnish neat granite head-stones for the graves of any 
Revolutionary soldiers whose names are sent them without any expense 
to the Society. 

In closing T wish to state, that the impression of the Board of 
'Management has been repeatedly confirmed that the best and only way 
to add to our membership is by personal solicitation. The record of the 
past year bears us out in this statement, as, through the efforts of 
perhaps eight or ten of our enthusiastic members, at least one-half of 
the new applications were secured. ] would, therefore, urge upon you 
to bear this in mind ami to lose no opportunity to speak to any friend 
or acquaintance who may be eligible to the Society. 

The annual meeting for the election of officers for the ensuing year, 
and other business, was held in the Chamber of Commerce rooms, Feb- 
ruary 22d, with .about thirty members present. 



156 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



The annual banquet was held on the evening of February 22d, at the 
Union Club, with about ninety members present. The speakers of the 
evening were Honorable John Barrett, Chief of the Bureau of South 
American Republics, whose subject was "Washington's world-wide 
influence in American prestige and commerce." Air. Barrett spoke for 
an hour most eloquently, and the statistics which he gave as to South 
America's present position in the commercial world were a revelation to 
his hearers. Our Chaplain, Rev. J. H. Bausman, D. D., recited from 
"Drummond's French-Canadian Poems" most charmingly and displayed 
great skill in interpreting these delightful poems. ''Ancient sires and 
modern sons" was the subject chosen by 1 Ion. IX. O. Randell, of Col- 
umbus, Ohio, an ex-President of the Ohio State Society. I T is address 
was not only interesting and witty, but very instructive, historically. 
Our genial friend and compatriot, Major Moses Veale, President of our 
Philadelphia Chapter, was with us also, and our evening would not 
have been complete without hearing from him. At the call of our 
President he addressed (lie Society in a few witty and well chosen 
remarks. 

F. G. Paulson, Secretary. 



RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 



The Rhode Island Society during the past year added 15 members 
to its roll. 

Number of members February 22, 1908 291 

Admitted during the year 15 

306 
Lost by death during the year . .' 5 

Number of members February 22, 1909 301 

Since we have lost by death 1 

Leaving the number at this date, April 24 300 

The past year has been a good one for this Society, and we hope to 
make a better showing this year. 

The marking of graves of our Revolutionary heroes still goes on. 

We held our annual services at the monument of Admiral Esek Hop- 
kins on Memorial Day, May 30th, which is always a complete success. 
Our President, Hon. Charles Warner Lippitt, delivered a fine address, 
followed by lion. Roswell B. Burchard, Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives of Rhode Island, and others. 

On Saturday, October 3, 1908, members of this Society, by invitation 
from the Massasoit Monument Association, of Warren, R. L, attended 
the dedication of a soldiers' and sailors' monument, to commemorate 
the local patriots who have borne arms in the wars of our country, at 
Warren, R. I. 

Two Chapters have been added this year, Pawtucket Chapter, No. 3, 
and_ Kent County Chapter, No. 4, which, we think, will help us in 
getting recruits. 

Mr. Gould, a descendant of Admiral Esek Hopkins, has deeded to 
the city of Providence the Hopkins homestead, and several acres of land 
for a public park. The use of the rooms is given to the Societies of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Colonial Dames, the 
Colonial Wars, and this Society expects to have the use of one of the 
rooms. 



PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS I 57 

The annual meeting was held on February 22, 1909, and the annual 
dinner was given at the Narragansett Hotel in the evening, at which 
President Lippitt presided, who gave a fine address on General James 
Mitchell Varnum. He was followed by the Governor of the State of 
Rhode Island, the mayor of the city of Providence, and the chief justice 
of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island, and by the Historian and Poet 
of the Society. 

The presence of the Varnum Continentals, of East Greenwich, com- 
manded by Compatriot Capt. Nathaniel H. Brown, added much to the 
entertainment. When they entered the banquet hall the color guard 
marched to a position in front of the main table, behind which was a 
portrait of George Washington, and when all the company had entered 
the hall, the colors were dipped and saluted with roll of the drums and 
finger tips at the visor. 

At the annual meeting the Society appropriated the usual amount of 
$100 towards the erection of a monument to General Nathanael Greene. 

Christopher Rhodes, Secretary. 

UTAH SOCIETY. 

The Utah Society admitted ten new members during the year; the 
outlook is excellent, and we confidently expect a very substantial addi- 
tion in the active membership of the Utah Society during 1909. The 
present membership is j6. 

The medal offered by the Utah Society for the most successful ora- 
torical patriotic effort by the Salt Lake High School boys was adjudged 
to Lawrence Clayton, of the Salt Lake High School, after keen and 
exceptionally good oratorical competition on February 18, 1909. 

The annual banquet of the Utah Society, Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, was held at the University Club, Salt Lake City, on April 19th, 
the anniversary of the Battle of Lexington. The banquet was excep- 
tionally well attended, forty-five members participating. The selection 
of toastmaster and speakers was a happy one, and the responses to the 
various toasts were of such a character as to mark the banquet as 
probably the most dignified and successful celebration of the local 
Society. 

Gordon Lines Hutchins, Secretary. 

VERMONT SOCIETY. 

The Vermont Society has at present an active membership of 2S0. 
During the past year seventeen new members have been received, five 
members have died, and two have withdrawn. The deaths include Rev. 
M. L. Severance, for several years State. Chaplain, and Hon. Hiram 
Carleton, a former Historian. 

During the past year the Society has issued a new roster. The His- 
torian is making preparations to write a history of Vermont in the 
American Revolution. 

The Vermont Society desires to call the attention of the National 
Society to the celebration this year, at Burlington and other points, 
beginning July 4, 1909, of the three hundredth anniversary of the dis- 
covery of Lake Champlain. Ethan Allen's capture of Ticonderoga in 
1775, Montgomery's invasion of Canada the same year by way of this 
lake, Arnold's naval battle on Lake Champlain in 1776, and Burgoyne's 
invasion in 1777 by way of Lake Champlain are events relating to 
Revolutionary history that will be observed this year. Members of the 
various Societies of the Sons of the American Revolution are cordially 
invited to be present and aid in the celebration of these notable events 
in our national history. 

Walter Hiee Crockett, Secretary. 



1 58 



SONS ()[• THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



j 



WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 



The Washington Society has admitted thirty members during the 
year, five have died, four have been dropped, and one. demitted to 
another State Society. 

The annual election was held at Seattle on February 22. In the 
evening the banquet was held at the New Washington Hotel, about a 
hundred members being present with their lady guests. The following 
program was successfully carried out. President If an ford gave the 
introductory address and Mr. Joseph Shippen acted as toastmastcr. 
The toasts were responded to as follows : "George Washington," by 
Mr. George II. VYalker; "The State of Washington," by Edward C. 
Hanford; "The Mission of the S. A. R.," by Overton G. Ellis; "Abra- 
ham Lincoln,'' by Albert H. Beebe ; "The Women of the American 
Revolution and Their Daughters," by President Penrose, of Whitman 
College. 

The State Society lias contributed five hundred dollars ($500) to- 
wards the erection of a statue of George Washington, by Leonardo 
Taft, on the campus of the University of the State of Washington at 
Seattle. 

The Page Lumber Company, of Buckley, Washington, has furnished 
a tree about two hundred feet in heighth, which our Society has trans- 
ported to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition grounds, and is erecting 
it as the official flagstaff of the Fair. 

Our Society, with the D. A. P., are to have charge of the exercises 
at the Fair on June 14th, in connection with Flag Day, and are now 
arranging elaborate and fitting exercises for the occasion. 

We have three flourishing Chapters in this State. The Spokane 
Chapter has been and is now the most active in recruiting new mem- 
bers. It has a membership of about twenty-seven. The Tacoma Chap- 
ter lias about twenty members, and the Seattle Chapter about twenty- 
nine. 

So much interest has been manifested by the students in the high 
schools over the prizes given by our Society for orations upon Revolu- 
tionary subjects that the prizes have been increased. Our Society now 
gives prizes of $30, $20, and $10 in each of the high schools of Seattle, 
Tacoma, and Spokane. The contests are held about the 22d of Feb- 
ruary, and are held under the auspices of the local Chapters. 

Our Society was very much disappointed that we could not have the 
Annual Congress meet with us this year of the Exposition, but trust 
that we may have the pleasure in the near future of entertaining in 
Seattle the delegates to an Annual Congress of the Sons. 

Augustus Armstrong, Secretary. 

April 14, 1909. 

The President General: The next order of business is old and 
unfinished business coming over from the last Congress. 

The Secretary General: All the old business was referred to the 
Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees by the last Congress. 
The Board and the Committee have acted on these matters during the 
year, ami the results have been published in the OFFICIAL Bulletin. 
There is nothing pending now. 

The President General: The next order of business is the new 
business, which includes the election of officers, etc. 

Mr. McCi.arv : hi order that this Congress may place itself in line 
with the arrangements already made by the Maryland Committee on 






rKuu;KiM,\<',s op i»Ar/riMOUK congukss 159 

Arrangements, whereby the election of officers is to lake place at 
Annapolis tomorrow in historic surroundings, I move you that when 
we reach the election of officers under new business that said election 
be postponed until tomorrow. 

Seconded and carried. 

Mr. MASTICK: Mr. President General: On behalf of the California 
delegation, I desire to offer this resolution: 

Resolved, That no member of a Society shall be a delegate to or a 
member of an annual or special meeting of a Congress, or shall be 
elected as an officer or be a member of a committee of' the National 
Society, unless he is a member in good standing in the State Society 
to which he belongs. 

The President General: You have heard the resolution as offered, 
which was coupled, as the Chair understands, with a motion that that 
resolution be referred to the Executive Committee. 

Seconded and carried,. 

Mr. MarblE: Mr. President General and Compatriots: I hold in my 
hand a letter, written to our Historian of the Empire State Society by 
the 1 ton. Mr. Wilcox, who, I understand, is a judge — at any rate, an 
attorney — in Porto Rico, and with your permission I would like to read 
a portion of that letter, lie says he would like to discuss with us the 
situation there, and goes on: "I think it would be eminently proper 
for the Society to interest itself in the situation here. 1 understand that 
the Society would be glad to take up any work here that would teach 
patriotism and love of our flag. This is very essential in the new 
possessions, like Porto Rico, where there is a large foreign population, 
and where the Spanish element is strong and is actually engaged in 
trying to retain its influence and make these possessions, while Ameri- 
can in name, Spanish in thought and practice. 1 wish you would take 
interest in this work." In this connection I would like to offer a 
resolution to the effect that this letter be referred to the Executive 
Committee with the request that they take up the matter by correspond- 
ence with Judge Wilcox, of Porto Rico. 

Seconded and carried. 

Major Yka[,K: Mr. President General: When the Congress me! in 
Philadelphia one of the compatriots called attention to the fact that he 
had visited the grave of John Morton, one of the signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, and he found that the grass and weeds had grown 
all over the grave; that the inscription on the monument had become 
entirely defaced, so that you could scarcely find the place where this 
very eminent man was buried. I, for one living in Philadelphia, felt 
very much ashamed that this matter should be brought to our attention 
by one not a resident of the city of Philadelphia. The State Chapter 
assumed the responsibility of contributing whatever funds were neces- 
sary to place this grave in good condition. The matter was referred to 
me and 1 visited the old Saint Paul burial ground in Chester, and there 
1 found matters worse even than had been reported. 1 had the weeds 



I()0 



SONS Ul- T1XIJ AMERICAN KK,VOI,UTlON 



and grass cut; I bad the monument cleaned from bottom to top; I bad 
the inscription all re-engraved or cut and placed in perfect order; then 
a walk was placed from the street to the grave; a flag pole was placed 
there, which is raised on all the National holidays. But. while I was 
doing this the thought occurred to me, "Where are the graves, and 
what condition are they in, of the other signers from the State of 
Pennsylvania ?"' I concluded that 1 would undertake and see if I 
could find where they were, what the conditions were, and the Philadel- 
phia Chapter assumed the expense of this. The result was I found one 
of these signers buried in North Carolina, one in Trenton, N. J., one in 
York - , Pa., one in Lancaster, and the others in the city of Philadelphia. 
In seeking for information upon the subject I asked a great grandson 
of one of the most distinguished signers and he could not tell me where 
his great-grandfather was buried. 1 succeeded, however, in finding 
the lot; I had a photograph taken of the grave; I then wrote a small 
biography of each one, had the photographs photogravured and I had 
them all placed in a little volume, a copy of which I hold in my hand. 
I then thought that, while we had placed in permanent form the signers 
of the Declaration from Pennsylvania, it would be a very good tiling 
as an educational matter that all of the other States would have placed 
in permanent form the graves and the history of the signers from those 
States. When the members of the Sons of the Signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence met in Philadelphia I went before them and laid 
the matter before them. The results so far of that have been that Con- 
necticut has a volume of the same kind of their signers, their graves, 
their history. Applications for these have been made all the way from 
California; all the historical societies almost have applied for copies, 
and it has been suggested in Philadelphia that they be placed in the 
public schools as an educational matter, for as to these signers we all 
know that no men are more worthy to have their memories protected. 
No greater deed was ever performed than by these signers. And T 
would ask', if it meets the approval of this Congress, that they pass a 
resolution requesting that the State Societies of the other eleven States 
have a volume or pamphlet of the same kind prepared. I am perfectly 
willing that, so far as the editorial work' is concerned, so far as all of 
the work is concerned, if simply the State Societies would send me a 
photograph of the grave, that 1 will do all of the work and ask no pay 
whatever, except that they will simply pay for the printing. (Applause.) 
Why, the monuments on some of the graves in some of the States are 
scarcely known, they are neglected as ours were in the State of Penn- 
sylvania until this matter was taken up. While we are erecting new 
monuments to the soldiers of the Revolution, why not look after the 
graves of the signers of the Declaration of Independence? Without 
their effort, without their worth, without their sacrifice, this Congress 
today would not be in session. There would be no Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. (Applause.) The influence that they sent out through 
the civilized world would be today mocked. Why not have every one 
of these thirteen States look after the graves of their signers. Some of 



100 SUNS Ul- THL-; AMERICAN KI'CVOI,UTJON 

and grass cut; J had the monument cleaned from bottom to top; I had 
the inscription all re-engraved or cut and placed in perfect order; then 
a walk was placed from the street to the grave; a flag pole was placed 
there, which is raised on all the National holidays. But. while I was 
doing tins the thought occurred to me, "Where are the graves, and 
what condition are they in, of the other signers from the State of 
Pennsylvania?'' I concluded that I would undertake and see if I 
could find where they were, what the conditions were, and the Philadel- 
phia Chapter assumed the expense of this. The result was I found one 
of these signers buried in North Carolina, one in Trenton, N. ] ., one in 
York, Pa., one in Lancaster, and the others in the city of Philadelphia. 
In seeking for information upon the subject I asked a great grandson 
of one of the most distinguished signers and he could not tell me wdiere 
his great-grandfather was buried. I succeeded, however, in finding 
the lot; I had a photograph taken of the grave; I then wrote a small 
biography of each one, had the photographs photogravured and I had 
them all placed in a little volume, a copy of which I hold in my hand. 
I then thought that, while we had placed in permanent form the signers 
of the Declaration from Pennsylvania, it would be a very good thing 
as an educational matter that all of the other States would have placed 
in permanent form the graves and the history of the signers from those 
States. When the members of the Sons of the Signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence met in Philadelphia I went before them and laid 
the matter before them. The results so far of that have been that Con- 
necticut has a volume of the same kind of their signers, their graves, 
their history. Applications for these have been made all the way from 
California; all the historical societies almost have applied for copies, 
and it has been suggested in Philadelphia that they be placed in the 
public schools as an educational matter, for as to these signers we all 
know that no men are more worthy to have their memories protected. 
No greater (icvd was ever performed than by these signers. And T 
would ask, if it meets the approval of this Congress, that they pass a 
resolution requesting that the State Societies of the other eleven States 
have a volume or pamphlet of the same kind prepared. I am perfectly 
willing that, so far as the editorial work is concerned, so far as all of 
the work- is concerned, if simply the State Societies would send me a 
photograph of the grave, that I will do all of the work and ask no pay 
whatever, except that they will simply pay for the printing. (Applause.) 
Why, the monuments on some of the graves in some of the States are 
scarcely known, they are neglected as ours were in the State of Penn- 
sylvania until this matter was taken up. While we are erecting new 
monuments to the soldiers of the Revolution, why not look after the 
graves of the signers of the Declaration of Independence? Without 
their effort, without their worth, without their sacrifice, this Congress 
today would not be in session. There would be no Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. (Applause.) The influence that they sent out through 
the civilized world would be today mocked. Why not- have every one 
of these thirteen States look after the graves of their signers. Some of 



I'UOCIC'KIMNGS OF HAl/riMORIj) CONCRK.SS LOl 

them may be in need of it; .some of them may be lost to sight; some of 
them are lost I know to memory. Why not revive that memory? Why 
not put life and vitality into the fact that these men by us will be 
remembered and honored, placed in the historical societies, placed in the 
libraries of the country in some permanent form by which the children 
as well as the adults can know the fact of who these signers were, 
where their graves are and whether they are kindly and lovingly cared 
for. I ask therefore that the resolution or the request of this Congress 
be made to the State Societies that they have prepared a history just 
similar to this. (Applause.) 

The President Genekai,: You have heard the resolution that the 
remaining eleven original States be requested to have prepared a pub- 
lication similar to that already issued in the two States to which Major 
Veale has referred. 

Seconded and carried. 

The President General: Compatriots: On the iqth day of April, this 
year, there was gathered in a neighboring city the representatives from 
the largest of the patriotic societies of this country. The occasion was a 
memorable one. It was the dedication of the temple erected by the 
zealous hands of that splendid organization, The Daughters of the 
American Revolution. (Applause.) This Society was honored upon 
that occasion by an invitation most graciously and courteously extended 
to your President General to attend those opening ceremonies and it was 
with great personal pleasure that T went there and gave a few feeble 
words expressive of our feeling towards that organization. That they 
have reciprocated it, and are reciprocating it, is evidenced by the fact 
that today there are honoring us by their presence here, Mrs. Donald 
McLean, the former President General of that Society, and Airs. Scott, 
their newly-elected President General, whom it gives me great pleasure 
to present to this Congress. (Vociferous applause.) 

Mrs. McLean : When your President General told you of our affair 
in Washington on the 19th of April, I remembered that I had opened 
my address then by saying, "We have come home." I say today with a 
redoubled meaning, ''I have come home." (Applause.) T have come 
home, not only to my home State and the home Sons, but the Sons 
from all over this country who have given me a place in their — if there 
are no wives that would object— I would like to say affections. (Ap- 
plause and laughter.) T have had a place for every individual one of 
you in my affections for your loyal and constant interest and support of 
me, which I have always felt was one of the most compelling factors 
in any success T may have had in patriotic work. I have truly come 
home. T have come home to the Sons! T have come home to my 
Maryland! T have just been informed by the President of the Mary- 
land Sons that Maryland has broken the record for the admission of 
new members during the last year. Now let me tell you right here that 
my memory of Maryland men when T was a girl makes me rejoice 
and that they are multiplying. (Applause.) T wish also, in this in- 
formal, but most feeling way, to pay tribute to the magnificent address 



UY2 SONS 01' '.I'lll', AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

your President General made for us on the loth of April. You know, 
as 1 have told you so often — I constantly repeat it and I even say it to 
my own sex, which shows my courage — that 1 am the old-fashioned sort 
of woman who loans upon the support and kindness of man, and I felt 
that the Daughters of the American Revolution under my presidency 
could not be properly represented unless the President General of the 
Sons of the American Revolution came and gave, us his approval on the 
dale of our opening-. Your President General did that and in his 
masterly address won the hearts of everybody and made me so proud 
that I had such a co-president and that he was good enough to speak 
for us as he did. Of course, we could not fail to wash to come to the 
Sons' Congress. When have I ever failed to want to go to the Sons' 
Congress and when it was a combination of the Sons' Congress — in 
Maryland — wdiy, it was just simply irrepressible, that was all. (Ap- 
plause.) J am supposed by the Daughters to be recuperating and re- 
posing in my old age when I am really renewing all my youth over here 
with you, and I have come here for recreation and repose and the 
happiness that really comes from congenial companionship when we are 
all working together for one great patriotic end. And I say to you as 
the outgoing President General, what I know my beloved incoming 
President General will say, that it is woman's place — I said it to the 
District Sons the other night — it is woman's place to make a home. 
We have made a home in Washington. We believe the home we have 
reared there as a memorial and as a practical place for the work of 
patriotism is unequaled in the world's history. It would not he perfect 
unless we shared it with you. Come to it; use it; hold your meetings 
there ; be at home in it ; be welcome to our hearthstone ; come, Sons, 
and be one with the Daughters, no matter where or how many. 
(Great applause.) T could not go from you — because I am coming 
back to every one of the Sons' Congresses, whether I go to the Daugh- 
ters' or not — but I could not go from you without one word expressive 
of the high admiration that I have for my successor. You know if you 
don't have love and admiration for your successor, you just hate her! 
But. as you know, as I have respect for the ability of and love for the 
woman and admiration for the personality of the present President 
General, I can be satisfied to be an honorary President General if the 
Sons don't forget me. (Shouts and applause.) 

The President General: Mrs. Scott, the newdy-elected President 
General. (Great applause.) 

Mrs. Scott : Mr. President General and members, Honorary Presi- 
dent General: T can think of nothing more beautiful in life, nothing to 
be more greatly treasured or more sacredly appreciated than an in- 
herited friendship. I shall feel myself most fortunate if, like my very 
distinguished predecessor, I may have the glory of inherited friendship 
with the Sons of the American Revolution. (Applause.) 

The President General : Resuming now the direct work of the Con- 
gress, is there any further new business to be presented? 



PROCEEDINGS <)]• l'.AI.TlMORK CONGRESS l6 



Mr. MacrudKr (D. C.) : I have a resolution to present in reference 
to a suitable memorial to Thomas Jefferson, which I will read: 

"Resolved, That a committee be appointed, of which the presiding 
officer and his successor shall be members, to investigate what plans, if 
any, have been formulated by the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Associa- 
tion regarding the erection at the National Capital of a suitable monu- 
ment to Thomas Jefferson as the author of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, and if such committee shall find that no such plans have been 
formulated, or are in contemplation, that then said committee, upon 
approval of the Executive Committee, be authorized to issue to the 
several State Societies an earnest appeal to lend their cooperation 
toward the realization of such project." 

I do not ask this because Thomas Jefferson stands preeminently great 
among the great men of our country. 1 do not ask this because he was 
governor of his native State, "The Cradle of the Republic." I do not 
ask this because, while Minister to France during the Revolution, he so 
fired the French mind by the genius of his personality as to bring us 
many noble recruits who developed into matchless military leaders. 
I do not ask this because he was Secretary of State in the cabinet of 
the Father of his Country during a formative and fostering period of 
our infant republic. I do not ask this because as President of our 
country his farsightedness prompted the purchase of that magnificent 
domain known as the Louisiana Purchase. But I do ask it because he 
was the author of the Declaration of Independence, an instrument 
hallowed by blood and sanctified by tradition, an instrument which 
embodies all the thoughts of liberty, an instrument which put high 
hopes and noble resolves into the hearts of our forefathers and crowned 
their stubborn efforts with success. Surely we, as their descendants, 
should here meet on a common ground and unite in our efforts to honor 
ourselves by paying deference to such a man. (Applause.) 

Mr. Dewey: Knowing that many in our vicinity have not heard the 
resolution so as to understand what it is, I would like to ask that it be 
read, Mr. President General, from the stage or the front part of the hall. 

Resolution read, seconded, and carried. 

Mr. Watktns : Compatriots: One hundred and twenty years ago 
today George Washington was inaugurated President of these United 
States. The date is also one of especial interest to this Society, as at 
that time the first plans were formed for this National Society and it 
seems fitting that we should today take some action as to that event, 
and I present this to the consideration of the Congress. I would move, 
sir, that the Congress place upon its records recognition of the fact 
that this is the T20th anniversary of the inauguration of President 
Washington, and also the date upon which this Society first started as 
a national organization. 

Seconded and carried. 

Mr. Hartsock: In view of the fact that there is likely to be some 
change in the time of the national inauguration, it seems to me as 
though it might not be inadvisable to suggest or recommend to those 



164 SONS Ol' Till? AMERICAN RICVuCUTION 

in authority that they use the date of the original inauguration, which 
will be a very advisable time to change to as to the time of the official 
inauguration of the President of the United States. I move that such 
a resolution be sent from this Society to those to whom it should 
properly go, that that would be the recommendation of this Society. 

The President General: Plow is it to be formulated? 

Mr. Hartsock : I will formulate it and hand it to the Secretary 
General. 

The President Generae: Very well. The motion, when formulated, 
will be that the recommendation be made to the Senate and House of 
Representatives that in considering any change in the date of the 
inauguration of the President of. the United States, this Congress 
respectfully suggests and recommends that such change of date be from 
the 4th day of March to the 30th day of April, the anniversary of the 
original inauguration of Washington as President. (Applause.) 

Seconded and carried. 

(The following resolution,, offered by a member of the Pennsylvania 
Society, was discussed and referred to the Board of Trustees: 

Resolved, That the request for the Liberty Bell, asked for by the 
managers of the Alaska-Yukon Exposition, be endorsed, and that Mayor 
Reyburn, of Philadelphia, and the city council of that city be requested 
to grant the same. 

The above action was reconsidered at Annapolis, May 1, the question 
was again discussed, and the resolution endorsing the sending of the 
Liberty Bell to Seattle was laid on the table.) 

The Congress then adjourned to meet in the State House at Annapo- 
lis on the following day, May 1. 

Afternoon Session, Annapolis, Md., May 1, igog — 2 p. m. 

The President Generae : It is with great pleasure that I present to 
you as a body one whom you have already met individually, and who 
is at this time the honored Governor of our State of Maryland, the 
Hon. Austin P. Crothcrs. (Applause.) 

Governor C rot hers: Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: Your 
Committee on Arrangements was kind enough to honor me by per- 
mitting me to say a word or two on this occasion at this time. In 
obedience to that very kind invitation I rise to bow my acknowledg- 
ment in the name of this city for the great honor that you have con- 
ferred upon us by visiting us today. So far as I am informed of the 
objects and purposes of this great organization, I know of no city in 
this country in which you would be more likely to find a generous 
response to those principles than this old city of Annapolis. (Applause.) 
I shall not, upon this occasion, because of the time it would take and 
because I recognize the particular knowledge and detailed information 
you have of all sections of the country upon this subject — but there 
has never been a time in the history of this country when the position 







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PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIMORE CONGRESS 



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which it has taken has not been one of conspicuous interest, so that 
we feel that while we are not a large city in population, we are big in 
patriotism — we are rich in interesting history in the affairs of this great 
country. (Applause.) They honor you as they ought, they appreciate 
your coming as they ought, and they, through me, extend to you the 
dead level of Maryland hospitality. (Applause.) 

I feel gratified as a Marylander that they do appreciate organizations 
of this kind, because if an organization, one of whose principles and 
purposes is the perpetuation of the memories of the men who lived and 
died for freedom's sake, what could we hope that would attract public 
sympathy in this country more than this great organization? We are 
glad that you are here, because we believe that there has been no time 
in the history of this country where the practical application of an 
active and aggressive patriotism is more needed than now. (Applause.) 
I am one of those who have always delighted to remember and to 
discuss the great unselfish deeds of the fathers of this colossal republic, 
and to take and encourage and to try as best we can to emulate their 
example; but, my friends, I believe in an active patriotism. I believe 
that there ought to be an electric spark back of the patriotism in order 
that we may show our appreciation of their great work, and make 
some little effort in our own day and generation to raise the standards 
of citizenship and higher responsibilities of the public officers of the 
country. I have sometimes felt that we ascribe, perhaps, more credit 
to ourselves than we ought in regard to the accomplishments of the 
Republic. I sometimes think that we, in gathering the ripened and 
ripening fruit, forget sometimes that that is the result of the self- 
sacrificing devotion of those men who laid deep the foundations of the 
Republic, without model or example, and who are entitled to the credit 
of the fruit that resulted from their patriotic deeds. They were men 
who were uninfluenced by selfishness; they were purified from all that 
because of the condition of the nation; they approached the solution of 
the government by the people with an intelligent patriotism, devoted 
to what would not be necessarily for their own personal good, but that 
it would be for the public good — for them and succeeding generations, 
in the great welfare of humanity itself. So, my friends, we want a 
little more of the aggressive patriotism. This great organization will 
help to encourage and inculcate that idea. We want to get just a little 
away from our own selfishness. We want to feel that in our con- 
siderations of public questions and of good government that we must 
close our eyes, if we want to do what is really our duty, to every 
consideration except that which is for the public good. And, my friends, 
I believe in that comes real satisfaction after all, no matter how rugged 
and rough the road, no matter how sweet public approval and public 
esteem. I saw once where it was said that "It is the most delightful 
thing, and a man is most fortunate to have it. but most pitiable to 
need it." So, my friends, 1 think that the work of your great organi- 
zation is helpful along the lines of good government, of higher citizen- 
ship, and that is exactly the work that I appreciate in. -your great 



1 66 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

organization. We are delighted to have you here. We want you to 
visit that old room over there, rich in the spoils of time. I am not 
going to talk about the great incidents that happened there and in this 
town, because it is filled — it is filled — with interesting, historical places. 
It has been called the "Athens of America," and I do not believe there 
has ever been a town of its size in our early history that has accom- 
plished with more intelligence the building up of the National Govern- 
ment and its maintenance afterwards than this city — intelligence, cul- 
ture, and patriotism. Through me they express their thanks for your 
visit here today. I conclude with the hope that your work in the future 
may be as creditable to you and as beneficial to the public as it has been 
in the past, and that you may flourish. But don't forget that in this 
city, when you are near enough to approach it, there is extended to you 
and the principles of your organization a welcome hand. (Applause.) 
The President General: There is a considerable amount of business 
to be disposed of this afternoon. Most of you have entered this build- 
ing through the old east portal. You have stopped there long enough 
to pass through the old senate chamber, rich and hallowed in its memo- 
ries, for it is, indeed, not merely historic, but is sacred ground. I do 
not wish to delay the proceedings of this session, but I am going to 
ask for just five minutes of your time, in which I shall ask Professor 
Bibbins, the Historian of the Maryland Society, to enumerate a few 
of the more important events which have occurred within the walls of 
that senate chamber. 

HISTORY OF STATE HOUSE AT ANNAPOLIS. 
By Arthur Barneveld Bibbins, Historian of Maryland Society. 

Your Excellency, Governor Crothcrs, Mr. Presidcyit General, Com- 
patriots and Friends: 

In the brief time allotted, perhaps, I can not do better than present a 
short chronology of the very historic building we are occupying, with a 
few of its more intimate connections. 

1634 is the date of the planting of the colony of Maryland at St. 
Mary's. Seventeen years later Annapolis was settled by the Puritans, 
who were driven from Virginia, and the town named "Providence." 
Forty-five years after this, in 1694, the Capitol of the Province was 
removed from St. Mary's to Annapolis, and the quaint old Treasury 
building, the "strong box" of the Colony, which you see just outside 
and the oldest official structure in this State, erected soon after. The 
great tulip poplar on the campus at St. John's College is the only 
surviving witness of the erection of this Treasury building, it being 
the same under which the Puritans made their treaty with the Sus- 
quehannocks in 1652. That building is said to have been used by the 
General Assembly to some extent before the erection of the first State 
House. 

The foundations of this first State House were laid in 1696. Eight 
years later this building was destroyed by fire, and with it many of the 
priceless early records. During the interval that followed the "March- 
arid House," on Prince George Street, is said to have been used by the 
Assembly, being one of the five existing Colonial Governor's houses in 
and about Annapolis. 



PROCEEDINGS 01 ? BALTIMORE CONGRESS iGj 

A new State House was erected upon the same site ten years later. 
This remained for sixty-eight years, and was torn down in 1769 to 
make room for the present structure, which was erected in I77-. just 
before the Revolution. Its corner-stone was laid by Governor . Eden, 
the Royalist, and it is said by those who were in a position to judge, 
to have been the finest official building in America, and that it remained 
such for many years. Its dome, the first erected in this country, was 
illumined by the flames of the brig, "Peggy Stewart," during the 
"Annapolis Tea Party," and within its walls met the Committee or 
Council of Safety, which raised levies and kept the brave Maryland 
Line and Continental Army filled. 

The architectural design of this building is said to have been inspired 
by the great Architect, Sir Christopher Wren, and one can readily be- 
lieve this from its modest resemblance to his masterpiece, St. Paul's, of 
London, which with its radiating streets no doubt suggested the "cart- 
wheel" plan of Annapolis, with the State House and St. Ann's as the 
chief centers. 

This plan has been unkindly characterized as like one laid out after 
dark by a citizen in his cups! But, notwithstanding this slur, General 
Washington, a frequent visitor to the town, adopted its plan of radiation 
as the most advantageous for the Capital of the Nation, and it was 
elaborated for him by Major L'Enfant, whose ashes have so recently 
been given a place of honor at Arlington. 

On the 23d of December, 1783, while the Continental Congress was in 
session in the old Senate chamber adjoining, General Washington came 
hither to perform that, perhaps, greatest and most significant of his 
deeds, the resigning of his Commission as Commander-in-Chief of the 
Continental Army, setting a distinguished pattern in modesty for all 
men of achievement for all time to come. 

The year following, in this same room, Congress officially ratified 
and signed the Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, and in it, also, in 
September, 17S7, a Convention of Delegates from five States, which had 
been suggested by Maryland, met and proposed a closer union of the 
States. Out of this meeting grew the Continental Congress of 1787, and 
our present form of government. 

Truly this venerable Senate chamber has been an historic ami mo- 
mentous room in the destinies of our Nation, and we esteem it a rare 
privilege today, one hundred and thirty-seven years after its construc- 
tion, to look upon its original chaste and classic lines, restored as nearly 
as possible, largely through the untiring interest and labors of our 
distinguished compatriot and former President General, Ex-Governor 
Edwin Warlield. 

Mr. Pucsi.rcY: Mr. President General: It would seem eminently ap- 
propriate at this time that some notice should be taken of the splendid 
action of our distinguished compatriot and past President General and 
former Governor of Maryland, Mr. Edwin W r arfield, in restoring the 
old Senate chamber, and I wish to offer the following resolution: 

Whereas, During the administration of Hon. Edwin Warfield, former 
President General of this Society and Governor of the State of Mary- 
land, the old Senate chamber in the State House at Annapolis, which 
we have this day visited, was restored to the form, style and appear- 
ance it had at the time there occurred therein these many incidents of 
Revolutionary history and of such hallowed memory; therefore, be it 

Resolved by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution in Congress assembled in tlie city of Annapolis, That we extend 
to our compatriot and former President General, ITon. Edwin Warfield, 



l68 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

an expression of our appreciation of the patriotic service that he lias 
rendered to his State and the Nation in accomplishing tin's work. 
Resolved further, That we extend to him our sincere thanks for this 

evidence of his interest in the great cause of patriotism and for the 
credit he has reflected upon the organization of which he has been such 
a useful member. 

I move yon, sir, Air. President General, the adoption of this resolution. 

Seconded by Mr. Dates and carried. 

The PRESIDENT GENERAL: Since the adjournment yesterday, two tele- 
graphic dispatches have been received which it seems proper to read 
to this gathering. 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
The Oklahoma Society sends cordial greeting to the National Con- 
gress and regrets that its delegate is unavoidably prevented from 
attending. 

A. H. Price, President. 

Pensacoea, Florida, May i. 
Florida Society of the Sons of the American Revolution sends best 
wishes and greetings to the Congress now in session. 

John Hobart Cross, President. 

At the hour of adjournment yesterday we were in the period of 
unfinished business. There are a number of matters to come up, but 
possibly it will facilitate the dispatch of business if we now take up 
that portion of unfinished business which constitutes the election of 
officers for the ensuing year. Therefore, in the absence of objection 
from some delegate, I. would hold that to be the present order of busi- 
ness, and nominations for the office of President General for the ensu- 
ing year will now lie in order. 

Mr. Curtis: Mr. President General, Compatriots: It is my pleasant 
duty, as President of the Connecticut Society, to {dace in nomination 
the name of one of our members who I think you will all find accept- 
able. A year ago, when I had the pleasure of seconding the nomination 
of our President General, I told you that we had in preparation and in 
training one of our members for this high position this coming year. 
You will remember that the Connecticut Society gave to us our first 
President General. Then, after long years of preparation, we gave you 
a Greeley. Since then we have had another in training. He has been 
the Vice-President of our Connecticut Society; for long years was on 
our Board of Governors; then, advancing to the National Society, he 
has been your Vice-President General once; he has been on your 
Governing Board, and, most of all. he is the author of your constitution. 
Now, like knights of old, after having served seven long years, less 
one, he asks for your sufferance as your President General for the 
coming year. It gives me great pleasure to place in nomination the 
name of the Plon. Morris B. Bcardsley, of Connecticut. (Applause.) 

Mr. Battis: It gives me great pleasure to second the nomination 
on behalf of the delegation from Massachusetts. I say this personally 



l'ROClvF.DlNGS (JI 



Al.'I'I MORK CONGIUvSS 



1 60 



and as a delegate from Massachusetts. Those of us who have known 
Judge Beardsley know of his work in the interest of this Society. I 
would say, sir, the Massachusetts delegation unanimously stand for 
the election of Judge Beardsley. 

Mr. Pugsi.Ey: Compatriots: 1 know that I voice the sentiment of 
the compatriots of the Empire Slate in seconding this nomination, 
During my term as President General three men rendered invaluable 
service in the interests of this great Society. Those men were Nelson 

A. McClary, of Chicago (applause); the Hon. Henry Stockbridge, of 
Maryland (applause), and the Hon. Morris B. Beardsley, of Connecti- 
cut (applause). Those of us who knew something about: what it 
meant to draft a new constitution for the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, which was adopted at the Denver Congress, know the amount 
of work which was done by our esteemed compatriot, Morris B. 
Beardsley, and those who were connected with him in tint work. 
(Applause.) We have already elected as President General Nelson A. 
McClary, of Chicago, and Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland. (Ap- 
plause.) And I believe that it is but just and right that the man to 
follow in the steps of these distinguished compatriots should be Morris 

B. Beardsley, of Connecticut. And 1 therefore, on behalf of the Empire 
State, second the nomination of Judge Beardsley. 

Mr. Mack: The State of Ohio has spent so much time in the last 
ten years in preparing men for the Presidency of the United Stales that 
it has had no time to train any man for the Presidency of this Society. 
Therefore, on behalf of my State, I second the nomination of Mr. 
Beardsley. (Applause.) 

Dr. C. N. Guyer: Mr. President General and Compatriots: While 
Judge Beardsley was in Colorado he won the hearts of every man 
of our Society. The only mistake that 1 knew him to make — and 
that has been pardoned long ago — was at the banquet table. Sitting 
as I was just across from Judge Beardsley, he leaned over and asked 
me what State T came from. I said, "Colorado." He said, ''Your 
name?" T said, "Dr. Guyer." He said, "Pardon me, Doctor; I didn't 
know you in your lull-dress suit." (Applause and laughter.) You 
know we are from the wild ami woolly West. But T want to rise, 
on behalf of Colorado, and second the nomination of Judge Beardsley. 

Colonel Guthrie : On behalf of the State of Pennsylvania I would 
like, Mr. President General, if it is in order, to move that the nomina- 
tions close, and that the election of Judge Beardsley be made unani- 
mous. 

Mr. Bates: Michigan has ever been faithful to Connecticut. We 
realize that in the early days many of the distinguished sons and daugh- 
ters of Connecticut came West — which at that time was the extreme 
West — and settled our State, and it gives me great pleasure, on behalf 
of the Michigan delegation, to support the nomination of Judge 
Beardsley. 

Gentleman from Illinois: On behalf cf the delegation from Illinois 



170 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

I wish to second the nomination of Air. Beardsley, from Connecticut, 
and I wish to second the motion of the delegate from Pennsylvania 
that the nominations be closed. 

Mr. DEWEY: As long as these men have all had their say I would 
like to put in a word. I have been trying to get up and say that, meet- 
ing Judge Beardsley in Denver two years ago and realizing what this 
committee has done in reporting this constitution to us and studying 
it since their great work was accomplished that Mr. Pugsley has told 
you about, and listening at that time to a memorial resolution in 
memory of Walter Seth Logan, who was a classmate and schoolmate 
of Judge Beardsley, I was reminded of this remark. He said, "Broad 
of mind, of the highest ideals." I have found, in my acquaintance with 
Judge Beardsley, that man, and for Vermont I second that nomination. 

J. H. Moore: Gentlemen of the Congress: It devolves upon me a 
great pleasure, on behalf of the delegation of the District of Columbia, 
to second the nomination of Judge Beardsley. I think that all that is 
necessary for any man in this Congress to satisfy himself of the fitness 
of this nomination is simply to look at the man and gaze into his face. 

Nomination seconded by gentleman from New Jersey. 

Mr. Chandler: Mr. President General: It is delightful to hear these 
speeches in favor of Judge Beardsley. We would not bottle anybody 
up or cork them up; we want to hear more, but I would like to make 
this motion, when it is proper to have the vote cast, that this Congress 
further honor Judge Beardsley by instructing the Secretary to cast 
one vote for him for his election at the time. In the meantime, let us 
hear all the good words for Judge Beardsley possible, and at the proper 
time let us instruct the Secretary to cast the vote for his election. 

Gentleman from Pennsylvania: I do not know whether we can, 
under the rules of this Congress, or not, but I want to second the 
nomination of Judge Beardsley, and I want to move the previous ques- 
tion on behalf of the delegation from Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Warfieed (applause and three cheers for the speaker) : Mr. 
President General and Compatriots: First let me thank you for your 
warm greeting. I just want to say one word about Judge Beardsley. 
There is not a member of this splendid organization of ours who has 
been more loyal, who has done more earnest work for the cause of 
patriotism. He has earned this distinction. He is a lovable man and 
I assure you that there has never been a President General who has 
graced the position with more dignity than he will grace it. I there- 
fore, recognizing, sir, the important work which you have before you 
and that this Society has before it this afternoon, second, on behalf of 
the whole organization (applause) the nomination of Judge Beardsley. 
I second the motion now to close the nominations, not because I want 
to have the last word, but because I am real sure that you all want an 
expression by voting for this splendid man for President General of 
our organization. 

The President General: The motion is that the nominations be 



PROCKLCDINGS Otf UAI/riMORlJ CONGRESS I /I 

closed, and that the Secretary of the Congress be directed to cast — 
the phraseology that I caught from the delegate, who moved it was — one 
ballot at a time for Judge Beardsley. 

Carried unanimously. 

Secretary General Clark: Mr. President General: The Secretary 
General casts one vote at one time for the election of Judge Beardsley. 

Mr. Pugsley and Mr. Warfield were appointed by the President Gen- 
eral as a committee to find Judge Beardsley and escort him before the 
Congress. On being presented to the Congress by the committee, after 
three cheers were given for the President General-elect, Mr. Beardsley 
spoke as follows : 

Mr. BEARDSLEY: Mr. President General and Compatriots: Only a 
short time ago in the city of New York I was present at a grerit dinner 
of 1,500 graduates of Yale, assembled to pay honor to their co-graduate 
of that institution, the first President that they had ever had of the 
United States. And as Mr. Taft rose to acknowledge the honor (ap- 
plause) the first words he uttered were these: "It is always hard to 
talk to men you love and to express to them in proper terms how you 
love them and why you love them, but I love every man in the sound 
of my voice." Now, if the President of the United States could say 
that to men that he never had seen, to men that were not in college 
with him, much more can I say it to my brethren, men whom for ten 
years I have stood shoulder to shoulder with in this grand cause that 
enlists the sympathy of all of us, men in whose cities and homes I have 
been taken, men whom I have met in Congress and out of Congress, 
and men who share with me above all the beloved remembrance of 
those compatriots that have worked with us in years past and now gone 
to the Heavenly Chapter above. Gentlemen, you have elected me to the 
highest trust in your gift, in a historic city, in a building filled with 
patriotic associations. You have conferred the honor upon me, I am 
told, by a unanimous vote, thus making it as honorable and as pleasing 
to me as it could possibly be. I have no words to feebly express what 
is in my mind and heart, but with all my heart I thank you. And, 
gentlemen, although I perhaps ought not to say this, I want to think 
today that you gave me this honor, not on account of the State of Con- 
necticut or even on account of the Connecticut Society, but for myself, 
for the loving patience which you have always shown me, and T feel 
that it is not on account of my merits. Mr. President General, I do not 
claim the ability which you have and which you have shown, but I yield 
to you or to no man in my honest endeavor to do my best for the 
interests of this Society and a warm regard which T feel for all of you. 
In my term of office I want to visit the homes of as many of you as I 
am able. I would like, if it were possible, to meet every one of the 
11,000 members of this Society. I want you to work with me, to hold 
up my hands, and, if at the end of my year I have attained in that war 
any considerable success, T will go back to my place in the ranks carry- 
ing a debt of gratitude that a life-time cannot discharge. Gentlemen, I 
thank you. (Applause.) 



172 



SUNS 01< Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



The President GenEkae: The next in order is nomination of Vice- 
Presidents General, of which there are five. 

Colonel Guthrie: On behalf of the Pennsylvania Society I am going 
to ask you to elect one of our favorite sons for the office of Vice-Presi- 
dent General. As judge Beardsley has just said, "It is hard to talk of 
those we love." The gentleman whom 1 would name to you is known 
throughout our State as a soldier of distinction and of a most prottd 
record. He is a member of the bar of high standing; he is an earnest 
Christian gentleman; he is President of the Philadelphia Chapter and 
Vice-President of the State Society. On behalf of my State I would 
ask you, gentlemen, to elect Major Moses Veale, of Philadelphia. 

Nomination seconded by gentleman from New Jersey. 

Mr. Ames: Gentlemen of the convention: 1 desire to put in nomina- 
tion for the office of Vice-President General of this Association the 
name of one of our prominent attorneys and citizens, Mr. George C. 
Sargent. Mr. Sargent is a son of the late A. A. Sargent, who settled in 
California, and is the President of the California Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. I am perfectly well aware that he is not 
known to many of you, but I am sure that he will honor the Associa- 
tion, he will honor our State, and you will honor the Society by electing 
him to that office. 

Nomination seconded by delegate from Massachusetts. 

Mr. YVentworth : In going from Pennsylvania to California you 
must cross the fertile prairies of Iowa, and Iowa desires to nominate for 
Vice-President General one of her past Presidents, one of the young 
men upon whose shoulders the duties of these offices must eventually 
fall, and I place in nomination Willard Secor, of Iowa. (Applause.) 

Nomination seconded by delegate from Nebraska. 

Mr. P.\r,Aimi\ : Mr. President General: In looking over the names of 
our Vice-Presidents General 1 find no representative of the Southland. 
I stand here from the distant State of Louisiana, as her only delegate, 
and I believe that the gentleman whom I shall have the honor to nomi- 
nate will show himself a worthy Vice-President of this distinguished 
body. He is a respected citizen of that State which I have the honor to 
represent, and he stands there well known in our social circles. Not 
only that; also in the municipal offices that they have seen fit to confer 
upon him, be has discharged I hose duties satisfactorily. I would nomi- 
nate Hon. Peter F. Pescud, of New Orleans. 

Nomination seconded by delegate from Maryland. 

Mr. Whitchjvr: On behalf of the New Hampshire Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution I wish to place in nomination for the 
office of Vice-President General of the Society the name of the Hon. 
Henry M. Baker. General Raker is one of the early members of the 
Society and one of the most active, efficient members of the New Hamp- 
shire Society. He has been twice President and occupies the office of 
President of the Society at the present time; has done most excellent, 
most creditable work- in literature pertaining to the Society, especially 
in relation to the battles of Bunker Hill and the Siege o( Boston; is 



L'ROClCKDlNGS oK HA1/T I iMoKIC CONGRESS 



l 73 



honored by the State; has sufficient leisure and time to give to the 
work of the Society, and should he be elected would make, I have not 
the least doubt, a most excellent and efficient Vice-President General. 
New 'Hampshire has asked little of the Society since its organisation. 
She has never been honored with any of the officers except as I have 
found, as I have found at this and other Congresses delegates whom I 
have met have nearly all hailed from New Hampshire or their ances- 
tors have, except by proxy, but now we ask for a New Hampshire man 
to be elected to the office of Vice-President General. I nominate, there- 
fore, for that office the Hon. Henry M. Baker. 

Nomination seconded by delegate from Massachusetts. 

J. II. MooRS : Mr. President General and Compatriots: Colorado is 
represented in this Congress by two brothers. It was rather hard for 
one brother to nominate the other, so I rise and, representing the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, present the name of Dr. C. N. Guyer for Vice-Presi- 
dent General. (Applause.) Dr. Guyer has shown in his great work 
during the past year that he is one of the greatest organizers that this 
Society has ever had. This Society cannot afford to lose his services 
for next year without strengthening his hand so that he can carry on 
the good work which he has commenced. I believe that by electing 
him Vice-President General he will do more work for the Society 
throughout the West than any other man that we possibly could put in 
the position. The fact that he holds the office of Vice-President General 
will strengthen his hand and give him more force to carry on the work 
which is so dear to his heart. I sincerely hope that every one present 
will vote for Dr. C. N. Guyer. 

Nomination seconded by delegates from New York, Pennsylvania, 
Vermont. Connecticut, Michigan, Illinois, and California. 

Moved (by Mr. Bates) that the nominations for the office of Vice- 
President General be closed. 

Seconded and carried. 

Ballot ordered by the President General, Mr. Mack, of Ohio, and Mr. 
Curtis, of Connecticut, being appointed as tellers. 

Air. WENTWORTH : I have been asked by delegates if Mr. Secor is not 
the present Treasurer General. He is, but is not a candidate for re- 
election, and I desire to state that to the delegates. 

Mr. PuGSLEY : May T ask that the names of the nominees for Vice- 
President General be read for the information of the delegates? 

The PRESIDENT GENERA!, : The names of those who have been nomi- 
nated are Major Veale, from Pennsylvania; Mr. George C. Sargent, 
from California; Mr. Secor, from Iowa; Mr. Pescud, from Louisiana; 
Mr. Baker, from New Hampshire; Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, from Colo- 
rado; that is all. While we are waiting for the ballot to be gathered, 
nominations for the office of Secretary General are in order. 

Mr. PuGSEEY: It gives me pleasure to nominate A. Howard Clark' for 
the offices of Secretary General and Registrar General. 

Dr. Parker: I rise to second that nomination. 






174 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Mr. Bates: Michigan is very glad to second the nomination of Secre- 
tary Clark. 

Moved (by gentleman from Pennsylvania) that the nominations for 
Secretary General and Registrar General be closed and that the His- 
torian General be directed to cast the ballot of the Society for A. 
Howard Clark as Secretary General and Registrar General of this 
Society for the ensuing year. 

Seconded and carried. (Applause.) 

The President General: Mr. Clark has prepared an elaborate speech 
for this occasion. (Applause.) 

Mr. Clark : Compatriots : I thank you. 

The President General: Nominations for the office of Treasurer 
General are now in order. 

Mr. Secor: Compatriots: I have had the pleasure of serving as 
Treasurer General the past two years, and you have kindly nominated 
me for the office of Vice-President General. I intended to retire from 
the office of Treasurer General, and I wish to nominate a gentleman 
with much more ability to fill the position than myself, from the city 
of New York, the Hon. John IT. Burroughs, and I move you, Mr. 
President General, that the rules be suspended and that the Secretary 
General cast the vote of the Society for Mr. Burroughs for Treasurer 
General for the coming year. 

Dr. Parker : I rise as a delegate at large from Massachusetts to say 
that Massachusetts wishes to second that nomination. 

Carried. 

Dr. Parker: I rise to place in nomination for the office of Historian 
General, or to renominate the gentleman who was elected and has 
served one year, Mr. Walter Kendall Watkins, of Massachusetts. 

Nomination seconded by delegates from New York and Connecticut. 

Moved (by gentleman from New Hampshire) that the nominations 
be now closed and Mr. Walter Kendall Watkins, of the Massachusetts 
Society, be elected, by a ballot cast by the Secretary General, as Histo- 
rian General of this Society for the ensuing year. 

Carried. 

Mr, Marble: New York honors herself and honors this Society by 
placing in renomination the name of the Rev. Frank O. Hall, of New 
York, for the office of Chaplain General. 

Seconded by Delegate Moore, of the District of Columbia. 

Dr. Parker: Massachusetts asks to second the nomination, and asks 
that the nominations be closed. 

Motion seconded by Mr. Eaton. 

The President GENERAL: The motion is that the nominations for the 
office of Chaplain General be now closed, and that the Secretary of 
this Congress be directed to cast the ballot of the Congress for the 
Rev. Frank Oliver Hall, of the Empire State Society, for the position 
of Chaplain General for the ensuing year. 

Carried. 



■ 
PROCEEDINGS OL- BALTIMORE CONGRESS 1/5 

Nominations for members of the Board of Trustees made by State 
Societies prior to May 1st, and the names of Presidents of State So- 
cieties that had not filed nominations, were read by the Secretary 
General. 

Moved (by Mr, PetTENGILX) that the Secretary of the Congress be 
authorized to cast the ballot of the Society for the names nominated by 
the State Societies as their representatives on the Board of Trustees, 
and for the President of each State Society failing to make such nomi- 
nation, for filling up that Board. 

Seconded and carried. 

(The names of Trustees elected for each State Society arc given on 
pages II and 12 of the present Year Book.) 

A resolution favoring the sending of the Liberty Bell to the Seattle 
Exposition was here discussed and laid on the table. 

Mr. Dewey : By request I am asked to offer this resolution, that 
there shall be sent to the Historian General each year, on or about 
April 1st, by the Historian of each State Society, a full account of the 
patriotic work done during the year, the celebrations observed, and 
with lists of the memorials placed during that year. This return shall 
be compiled by the Historian General and presented to the Congress in 
his annual report. This report may also include any original matter 
not before published relating to the Revolution. 

Moved that the above resolution be adopted. 

Seconded and carried. 

Mr. Bates: I know 1 voice the sentiment of every delegate present 
when 1 say that at no time have we been more handsomely entertained 
than at this Congress, and that those who are responsible for it are the 
■officers and members of the Maryland Society. And in accordance with 
that idea I desire to offer this resolution: 

// is resolved. That the thanks of this Congress are hereby tendered 
to the Maryland Society for the very satisfactory and complete manner 
in which they have entertained the Congress, and also the Hon. Henry 
Stockbridge, as President General, for the very impartial and efficient 
manner in which he has presided over the proceedings of the Congress. 
(Applause.) 

On the suggestion of Mr. Marble, I include the Daughters of the 
Maryland Society. Well, we will put in the Governor, too. If there 
are no more amendments to this resolution I will put it to a vote. 
(Motion seconded.) All those in favor of it will please say "Aye." 
It is carried. 

The President General: Upon yesterday the matter of the award of 
the fulb gold insignia of the Society, which was offered one year ago 
by a member to the Society which should bring in the largest number 
of sons of present members, was referred to the Secretary General for 
verification of certain data upon that point. That verification has now 
'been completed and it is my very great pleasure to announce that the 
State of Michigan is entitled to that honor, and that the emblem is 



176. SONS 01? TIlK AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

accordingly awarded to the State of Michigan. (Applause.) I will 
ask the delegates of that State to arrange among themselves as to who 
shall be the bearer of this insignia to their Society. 

Mr. HARRIS: It is indeed an unexpected pleasure to the delegates 
from .Michigan to hear this announcement, and it is a great honor to 
me to be delegated to bear the insignia home. In thanking the unknown 
donor of this beautiful insignia, I would say that I am glad that it has 
been awarded in this historic place, where the generous hospitality of 
Maryland has been so freely shown. We in Michigan have a great deal 
of material to draw upon, for Michigan, as you know, was settled very 
largely by those from New England States, and there are thousands 
among us that we desire to get into our Society. I assure you that 
you will hear from us again. Thank you. (.Applause.) 

The PRESIDENT GENERAL,: The ballot for Vice-Presidents General has 
resulted as follows: Mr. Veale, of Pennsylvania, has received 194 votes 
(applause) ; Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, of Colorado, has received 193 
votes (applause) ; Mr. Sargent, of California, has received 178 votes 
(applause) ; Mr. Secor, of Iowa, has received 174 votes (applause), 
and Air. Pescud, of Louisiana, has received 137 votes. These five gen- 
tlemen are accordingly elected as our Vice-Presidents General for the 
ensuing year. There is required to be a drawing to determine the 
order of precedence among these gentlemen, and if those who placed 
these names in nomination will kindly step forward to the Secretary's 
desk and draw for them the order of rank will be legally established. 

Drawings for Vice-President General resulted as follows: 

First Vice-President General .Clarkson N. Guyer 

Second Vice-President General Peter F. Pescud 

Third Vice-President General Willard Secor 

Fourth Vice-President General George C. Sargent 

Fifth Vice-President General Moses Veale 

On motion by Mr. James F. Hancock, of the Maryland Society, the 
Twentieth Annual Congress then adjourned without day. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 



' 






BANQUET SN HONOR OF THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL CONGRESS, 

GIVEN BY 

THE MARYLAND SOCIETY AT THE HOTEL BELVE- 
DERE, BALTIMORE. 

SATURDAY EVENING, MAY i, 1909. 



Mr. GaiTHER (10:30 p. in.) : The President will recognize General 
Clinton L. Riggs, of the Maryland Society. 

General Riggs : Mr. President: In an English school recently a young 
girl was asked to explain the English method of colonization. She said, 
"Well, you know the English first send out missionaries, and the mis- 
sionaries go to the far countries and they gather all the people to- 
gether, and after they have gotten the crowd assembled they say, 'Let 
us pray.' Then, when everybody closes their eyes, they run up the 
English flag." (Applause.) Gentlemen, the transformation I am going 
to ask you tonight will not require that you close your eyes. Air. 
President, as one of the members of the National Committee, I have 
been asked to request that you, sir, having now temporarily completed 
your duties as President of the Maryland Society, do now continue to 
preside as the toastmaster of this banquet. 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITHER,' PRESIDENT OF 
THE MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

Gentlemen ok the Socifty 01' the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion AND THi; DEAR LADIES WHO ACCOMPANY THEM, WHOM WE CALF THE 

Daughters of the American Revolution : On behalf of the Maryland 
Society I rise this evening to bid each and every one of you a most cor- 
dial welcome on this occasion. I want to say to you that, though Alary- 
land cannot boast of any great held upon which the conflicts of the 
Revolutionary War were fought, though she cannot point to a Saratoga 
or a Bunker Hill, or a Valley Forge or a Yorktown, as the classic spot 
upon which one of the great conflicts of the war was fought, yet she can 
and docs recall to your minds that on the soil of her Commonwealth 
some of the most important events in the history of our great country 
at the time of the Revolution were finally accomplished. And I want 
to say to you that since you have been our guests in the city of Balti- 
more I trust and hope that you have all seen the monument that we 

1/7 
12 



lyS sons oi' 'mi; American revolution 

erected to the memory of George Washington. I want to say to you 
here that the people of Maryland raised that monument to him largely 
by the result of a lottery system that was established at that time, by 
which we appealed to that spirit of getting something for nothing which 
makes you go out and play the ponies at Pimlico on different occasions, 
and I want also to say to you, to assure you, that the old times have 
changed and the old manners are gone. I stood in the United States 
Court only last Wednesday and saw United States Judge Morris, whom 
we hoped to have with us this evening, sentence a gentleman to thir- 
teen months in the Atlanta penitentiary for selling lottery tickets in 
the city of Baltimore. I also hope that you have noticed the fact that 
George Washington is situated at the top of the monument and that a 
lion is situated at the base of the monument. Perhaps you have noticed 
the fact that this lion has gone to sleep. Now the question of how that 
lion went to sleep, I want to tell you, arose in this way: They say that 
he watched for George to come down for ten years and George stayed 
in one position, and so the lion has gone to sleep sitting up, so you can 
see how he is doing. I want to call your attention again to how old 
times have changed and old manners are gone. George Washington 
stays on the top of his pedestal because the lion is' down at the bottom, 
but the last President of the United States has gone over to Africa to 
kill all of them he can. And so, gentlemen, we hope that you have 
visited the other historic spots in Baltimore; but we want to say to you 
tonight that Maryland, although she has no battlefields, although she 
cannot call your attention to any great conilicts, as I have said, upon 
which the Revolutionary sires won their great contests, yet she had 
here in the city of Baltimore at one time in the trying history of our 
country a place for the assembling of the Continental Congress, and 
the Sons of the American Revolution of Maryland have marked that 
spot forever in the city of Baltimore. And then you have gone with 
us today to that classic old city of Annapolis, and you have seen there 
the spot where George Washington, the Father of his Country, laid 
down his commission at the feet of the Congress that gave it to him — 
an example of patriotism unparalleled in the history of any nation, and 
that has written his name higher in the annals of fame than any record 
that has ever been given to him by the Continental Congress. And, 
although we cannot point you, as I say, to the battlefields of the Revo- 
lution, yet I want to say to you, our guests tonight, and I want to say 
that to his honor the Mayor, who sits with us, that we are proud of 
the fact that old Baltimore, the old colonial city of the colonial days, 
is the only city in the colonies of those days that was untouched by the 
foot of a conquering foe. Yes, Baltimore never surrendered, and when 
the good old war for independence for the second time — because I be- 
lieve that the War of 1812 was the second war of independence of the 
United States of America — when the second war of independence came 
to us, although the city of Washington was captured, yet when Ross 
and his veterans of the English army landed at North Point, it was the 
sons of Baltimore who went out to battle with them — with those vet- 



T J ! l$ 11 AT/r I MOR lv BANQU L;T 1 79 

erans of the British army — and I am here tonight to tell you that those 
veterans drove back that army of Englishmen in the battle by land, 
and when the battle by water came old Fort McIIenry stood there 
forever with the star-spangled banner waving above it. I want- to say 
to you that that star-spangled banner gave the inspiration to a Mary- 
land man, Francis Scott Key, to write the national anthem of our 
country. And so tonight, as the first toast to be given is a toast to be 
drunk standing, I want to ask each and every one of you afterwards 
to join us in singing that national anthem, The v Star Spangled Banner. 
I offer a toast to the first citizen of the United States, whom we love 
to honor — I he President of the United States. (Toast drunk and na- 
tional anthem sung, all standing.) And now, gentlemen, I want to 
propose another toast, to be drunk standing, after which we will sing 
two verses of America. I propose a toast to that man whom Maryland 
loves to honor because he belongs to our sister State of Virginia and 
to the whole nation, to the memory of General George Washington. 
(Done as indicated.) And now, gentlemen, I want to propose a third 
toast to our sires, and to the Army and Navy of the United States. 
(Done.) And now, gentlemen, you come to the reason why this head 
table exists — in order that we may inflict some certain speeches upon 
you. I want to say that, though this is Saturday night, 'we have the 
mayor of Baltimore with us, and therefore there is no such a thing as 
Sunday tonight and we are going to keep it going. As I say, I want 
to tell you the reason why this head table up here exists. The Consti- 
tution of the United States provides that there shall be no such a thing 
as cruel and inhuman punishment. We have wandered somewhat far 
away from that old idea. I want to say here for the information of our 
guests, however, and especially for the information of those guests who 
may not be familiar with the fact, that our guest of the evening, the 
mayor of Baltimore, has been suffering from a great deal of cruel and 
unusual punishment. You will recollect that the Chinese have a way 
of punishing a man by letting drops of water fall upon him from some 
point, a drop at a time, and they say it is a most excessive form of 
torture. It goes slow, Mr. Mayor. But the difference with our mayor 
at the present time is that they are dropping water on him quickly;' 
that is the only difference, and that is cruel and unusual punishment. 
And as though not satisfied with that, they have been putting him in 
a football game, and he has had more trouble on his hands than any 
football team J have ever known of. But, gentlemen of the Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, you are not here tonight to 
hear about the affairs of the first city of Maryland, the city of Balti- 
more. We have the men here to talk about that if you wanted to hear 
about it, but we want to hear about the affairs of the National Society, 
and I am going to ask a gentleman tu speak upon a point that is very 
vital and of vital importance to every man of us. We are all interested 
in the vital question of appointments, special appointments in Wash- 
ington, and we have with us tonight a gentleman who has a great deal 
to do with appointments, because all the appointments of the Treasury 



180 sons oj? r 1 1 j-; amjckican kk volution 

Department of the United States are in his hands, Colonel Lyman, who 
has charge of the Treasury Department appointments, and I am going 
to ask him to tell the National Society by appointment whatever he 
chooses to tell us on that subject. Colonel J.yman. 



ADDRESS BY COL. CHARLES LYMAN, OF THE DISTRICT OF 

COLUMBIA. 

Mr. Toastmastkr, Com patriots, Ladies and Guests : The toastmas- 
ter has suggested that I might talk about appointments, and especially 
appointments in the service of the National government. I do not 
propose to talk about appointments. I propose to talk for a few 
moments, and a few moments only, on a more practical subject, and 
one which I hope before I get through you will think concerns you 
and each of you men, women, and children, if there are any. About 
nine years ago the Boxer uprising in China occurred. (Don't think 1 
am going too far away from home to begin : I will get back home after 
a while.) That was a reaction which followed certain reforms in 
China which had already begun to materialize. After that uprising was 
put down and order was restored in China, largely by the valor of the 
American troops, there began in that great empire a revolution. It 
began quietly, but it has progressed with remarkable rapidity, and I 
fancy that there are comparatively few people in the United States 
who know to what an extent that revolution has progressed. When the 
Boxer uprising started there were about 500 miles of railroads in China. 
There are today more than 5,000. At that time the educational system 
of China was a system of examinations in the classics; you all know 
something about that. At this time that system of education has 
entirely disappeared in China — a most remarkable circumstance when 
you consider that China for more than 2,000 years has practically been 
dead to the world and to the influences of the world. The system of 
education in China today is largely patterned after that of Germany 
and the United States, and in every village of the Chinese Empire there 
is a primary school ; in every province there are high schools ; in every 
province there is a college, and at Peking there is a University of the 
Empire. I say this new system of education in China is patterned after 
the educational systems of Germany and of the United States. Do 
you think that this is a far call from the business that is before us as 
vSons of the American Revolution? Do you think that, in going to 
China to call your attention to this condition, I am going too far away 
from home? I tell you, my compatriots, there is no question before 
the American people today that, is so live, that concerns you and each 
of you so much as this very fact concerning the Empire of China. We 
have to deal with this renaissance of China, its awakening, as a matter 
that concerns each enc of us, for it brings into active participation in 
the active affairs of this world a great people that has lain dormant Foi 
2,000 years — a people that must be reckoned with within your lifetime 






THE) BALTIMORE BANQUET lSl 

and mine, if we live only ten years longer, or even a shorter period 
than that — and I say to you, Mr. Toastmaster, and to you, Mr. Presi- 
dent-elect of this Congress, that before another Congress of the Sons 
of the American Revolution shall meet events will have marched with 
such rapidity that we will be compelled to take notice of what is going 
on in the Empire of China. Only a short time ago we began to realize 
to what an importance and to what immense power the Empire of Japan 
had grown ; but Japan is a baby compared with China, and when China 
awakens and takes on her strength and begins to assert her right to 
participate in the affairs of this world, then the American government 
and the people of the United States will have to take notice of that 
power. (Applause.) And it is barely possible that we may have to 
readjust ourselves to the new condition which will be met with when 
that takes place. We go to our own history and we see that under the 
Articles of Confederation under which our Revolution was fought and 
our liberty won we could not establish a firm and stable government. 
Why, the Articles of Confederation and the conditions under which we 
lived at that time were not sufficient to control and adjust even our 
commercial relations, and a convention called in this State, which met 
in the city of Annapolis for commercial purposes, resulted in the forma- 
tion of the Constitution of the United States in order that the general 
Government might have such control over our commercial affairs that 
we could go on our way in an orderly and stable manner. Only a few 
months ago there occurred on the Pacific coast an incident which 
stirred our whole country from boundary to boundary, and which has 
been felt throughout the whole world — a very simple matter in itself. 
The question was whether the Japanese might be introduced into the 
public schools of the city of San Francisco, a small matter, but this 
Government felt itself bound to take notice of that fact, because Japm 
is a power that must be reckoned with in the United States. Now this 
leads to one thing that I want to suggest to this Congress as the thing 
which is of the very first importance for us as a people to consider. 
We have treaty relations with all the great powers of the world, but 
under our institutions as they are at present understood and interpreted 
the National Government appears to be unable to deal with and enforce 
the stipulations of our treaties. Now, gentlemen, it may be necessary, 
in order that the affairs that are strictly national and international may 
be dealt with by national authority, that we must either have a different 
construction of the provisions of our Constitution or amend the Consti- 
tution, for it is inconceivable that the United States Government can 
be maintained and perpetuated when the Government itself cannot en- 
force its treaty stipulations. There must be something besides the town 
meeting or the district school to overturn and upset the treaty stipula- 
tions of the United States. (Applause.) Now that is the principal 
point that I wanted to bring before you tonight, and I want to leave this 
thought with you, that this country is a nation, and if we are to succeed 
on the lines on which we were established we must deal with the ques- 
tions that come before us, National questions Nationally, State ques- 



182 SONS OI< Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

tions by State authority, local questions by local authority, and we 
cannot have local authorities dealing- authoritatively with questions 
strictly pertaining to our National condition. (Applause.) We may 
have to meet that question. If we do meet it wc will meet it, 1 am 
convinced, in the true spirit of patriotism with which we have met every 
question from the organization of our Government down to the present 
day. If any change is needed in our system of government to adjust 
it to these conditions that come day after day which were not antici- 
pated in the beginning, could not have been anticipated, it can be solved 
in a manner perfectly consistent with the principles which underlie our 
governmental system, our governmental frame-work. Our liberty can 
be maintained, our justice can be maintained, every vestige of authority 
which we now possess can be maintained, and wc can still meet the 
grave conditions which are coming upon us. We are no longer an 
isolated people. We have in the truest sens*.: and in the fullest sense 
become a world power. China is our neighbor. What is going on in 
China today concerns us and concerns each of us (applause) and con- 
cerns all of us, and don't forget it, and prepare for it! Do your think- 
ing along that line, for sooner than you may now believe we shall be 
called upon to meet great questions that have never been met before. 
But we are patriotic enough, we are honest enough, we are truthful 
enough to meet those conditions and solve them to the interest and 
permanent welfare of our great country. (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITHER. 

Gentlemen: I am sure we have all listened with the greatest interest 
to the very instructive words of Colonel Lyman as to the dangers that 
our country may be involved in relative to China. But for fear that 
you may be unnecessarily alarmed this evening about it, I want to say 
for our own comfort that only a short time ago there was quite a fall 
of (C) china out that way and we do not think there is going to be 
any more danger from it for the next few minutes, and so about the 
Boxers, Colonel, I don't think there is any danger about that as long 
as Johnson and Jeffries are to decide the championship between them- 
selves. But tonight I want to say that we are gathered together in a 
State that is known by the name of Maryland. (Applause.) Now 
there is no connection at all between Maryland and anybody else. I 
attended a banquet a few years ago of the St. George's Society, a 
society, you know, of patriotic Englishmen that assemble once a year, 
and it happened to be on the 23d of April. Being seated next to the 
president of the society, and the fund of conversation running rather 
low at that time of the evening, I asked him whether there was any 
coincidence at all between the 23d of April and the St. George's Society. 
He thought for a moment and he said, "No; nothing in particular that 
I know of, except it is St. George's Day." And so, when we come to 
the question of the State of Maryland — well, for a number of years in 



THE BALTIMORE BANQUET 183 

Maryland we have only associated it with one man. That toast has been 
responded to so many times in so many eloquent ways by one gentleman 
that I am reminded of a story that I read the other day, and I want to 
tell you about it. I am going to tell you about something that was dis- 
covered by an old alchemist in the days of 1550, that, if we only knew 
the secret of it, if I told you its secret, it would make you independent 
of the Standard Oil trust and everything else. I read the other day — 
and this, unfortunately, was a discovery that was not handed down — 
that there was an old alchemist who discovered this wonderful fact,, 
that whatever money he paid out to any one on any one day within 
one hour it returned into his pocket again without any change. Now 
think of the possibilities of that secret of alchemy! Why, $10,000 — if 
we had the capital and paid it out and got it back again in an hour, we 
could have this banquet duplicated every hour of the twenty-four, and 
we could keep it going. And what has that to do with Maryland? 
Why, I want to tell you that we have a son of Maryland who can make 
a good speech on Maryland every hour of the day and repeat it on the 
next and you would not have any trouble about enjoying it. And this 
man is to speak, and he can tell you in response to that toast all the 
glories of this good old Commonwealth of ours, so that you will rejoice 
to feel that you are gathered together under the yellow and black of 
Maryland. And I propose a toast to the State of Maryland, and wc are 
going to sing "Maryland! My Maryland!" and I am going to ask 
Governor Warfield to respond to that toast. 

(Great applause, and song rendered as announced.) 

ADDRESS BY MR. WARFIELD. 

Mr. Toastm aster (three cheers given for Mr. Warneld), Compa- 
triots, Daughters oe the American Revolution, and Ladies who are 
not members oe that Organization : I have been wondering why this 
Congress has been a great success and I have been making my own 
calculations, and I find that the members of this Congress have brought 
either their wives or their daughters with them, so they have been 
attending to business on this trip. When we met at Buffalo my friend, 
whom you then elected as President General of this organization, told 
you if you came to Maryland that we would try and give you a good 
old Maryland time and a Maryland feast. It is not for us to say how 
w r cll we have succeeded (voice: You did it), but I want to tell you 
this, that you have given to us Marylanders a great deal of pleasure 
by coming here. (Applause.) You have inspired us as it were anew 
with patriotism, and we are today better Sons of the American Revo- 
lution than we have ever been. (Applause.) We are proud of the 
record that Judge Stockbridge has made as President General of this 
organization. (Applause.) I had the pleasure in Buffalo of saying if 
you elected him as President General of this great, this magnificent, 
organization that he would make good, and I know that you will vote 



184 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

unanimously that he has made good. (Applause.) You have today 

elected a new President General. I seconded the nomination of that 

gentleman in the convention at Annapolis. I haven't time to tell you 

all I know about him and I didn't have time then. I did say that he was 

an earnest and a patriotic member of this organization — a man that we 

all honor, respect, and really love. You know there is something about 

this organization that appeals to our best impulses. As I said to my 

dear friend General Greeley, who succeeded me as President General 

of this organization (applause), I said, "General, the ties seem to grow 

closer and closer every time we meet; we seem to be bound together 

by ties that are very sweet and dear to us." I think there is a great 

deal in that. I have been associated with Judge Bcardsley in this work 

for fifteen years. (Applause.) I have always found him earnest; I 

have always found him working for what was best in this organization. 

This is a great organization. (Applause.) Now this is not a social 

organization. I remember last week, in going from Cleveland to 

Columbus, Ohio, sitting near a gentleman in the Pullman car, a man 

who rather attracted my attention. We got into conversation and he 

spoke of the Congress of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 

and slightingly referred to the fact that "they were having a lively time 

down there." I said, "Yes, they may be having a lively time down 

there, as you term it, but I want to tell you, sir, that they are doing a 

magnificent, they are doing a great work." (Applause.) lie said, "My 

wife is a member of that organization and I am entitled to membership 

(applause) ; or rather membership in our organization." "Well," I 

said, "shame upon you that you have not proved your right to become 

a member of the Sons of the American Revolution." I said, "You are 

wearing a button of the Grand Army of the Republic, and what would 

you think of your son if he did not venerate that and try to perpetuate 

your memory and the memory of those who have done great deeds 

for our country?" And when I find men who speak slightingly of this 

great organization I become indignant. A man who has not time to 

give to the cause of patriotism ought not to enjoy the privileges of an 

American citizen. (Applause.) That is the way I feel about it. Now 

you visited Annapolis. We are very proud of our record. See what 

your assembling in this city means to the v State of Maryland. We have 

told you something about our proud record. We have told you about 

the splendid bravery of the old Maryland line. (Applause.) We have 

told you about the Four Hundred on Long Tsland. We have told you 

about the burning of the "Peggy Stewart." We have told you about the 

places of historic interest in this State. You did not realize until today 

what we had here. You went to Annapolis and we showed you the 

old senate chamber there, and just there, in connection with that senate 

chamber, I want to make a confession to this organization. I sat in 

that senate chamber during the winters of '82 and '84 and in the 

session of 18S6, and presided over the Maryland Senate right on the 

spot where Mifflin sat when he received the resignation of Washington 

of his commission. At that time the senate chamber was a beautiful 



TIIIC BALTIMORE BANQUET 185 

room; had in 187S been remodeled, refurnished, and made an up-to-date 
room during the administration of a descendant of Charles Carroll of 
Carrollton, who is today not only the President of the Maryland So- 
ciety of the Sons of the Revolution, but President General of the 
National Society of the Sons of the Revolution. Now let me tell you 
what the organization of these patriotic societies has done for me and 
done for Governor Carroll. Governor Carroll did not stop to think 
in 187S, when the powers who had control of the affairs of this State 
wanted to expend a good deal of the State's money in refurnishing and 
remodeling that grand old historic building. They tore out all of 
those things that were historic and made it a beautiful modern build- 
ing, and he has said to me since, "I never thought for a moment that we 
were desecrating this chamber." And I confess to you today during 
those three winters that I sat there as a representative of my com- 
munity in that historic and sacred chamber, I never thought for a 
moment that it had been desecrated by the change that was made in it. 
But in 1802, when the Maryland Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution was organized, a new spirit sprung up in rne and I realized 
that we had done a sacrilegious thing in changing that chamber, and 
I then made up my mind that if I could aid in restoring it to its original 
form I would do so. (Applause.) Now that was a lesson that was 
taught me by the organization of this Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, and when I became governor I determined that during 
my administration that chamber should be restored to the form and 
the style that it was in when Washington resigned his commission, irid 
when all of these historic events occurred therein. (Applause.) You 
have seen how truly that has been done. No man can go into the 
senate chamber at Annapolis without feeling an inspiration. No man 
can go there and read the words of Washington in (hose bold letters 
framed on the walls there without eoming away a better American and 
a better citizen. One of the members of this organization who was 
there today said to me, "After our meeting was over I went back into 
that sacred chamber, and when I recalled that there was the very spot 
where the Father of our Country stood when lie handed back to Con- 
gress that commission given to him to lead the rebellious troops of 
the volunteers, when I realized that in that room the first action was 
taken to make this a more perfect union, tears welled into my eyes, and 
I go home remembering with pleasure this day." (Applause.) I am 
not going to tell you, gentlemen, about our grand old State. We have 
a glorious record.' You have honored us in coming here. We can 
never forget you. You have inspired our citizens, and when I learned 
that during the administration of Judge Stockbridge the membership 
of our organization had increased I was greatly pleased. I am a private 
citizen. I have time now to devote to this patriotic work. I love it. 
(Applause.) You, my friends, are writing the true history of the Revo- 
lution. As a boy I read the names of the Signers of the Declaration 
of Independence and read the names of a few men who held important 
commissions in the army. But now, thank God, 1 can read the names 



l86 SONS OL< Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

in the records that we have prepared, that we are publishing, of the 
men who were behind the gun, and of the men who won our freedom 
from British rule. (Applau.se.) It is growing late. Somehow or other 
I cannot help but warm up when I look into the eyes of the men who 
are descended from those heroes who made our great country possible. 
It is a great heritage. Go home and teach your children to venerate 
the memory of the men who made our nation possible. (Applause.) It 
won't make you proud, but it will make you true citizens. It will make 
your sons true citizens to realize that they have flowing through their 
veins the blood of the men that made this great nation what it is today. 
You know we are eighty millions, and I was out West not long ago 
and it occurred to me, as a man believing probably in principles that 
many of you do not endorse, that it might not be a good thing to advo- 
cate a man who is only once removed from the immigrant, and who 
has not in his veins the blood of the founders of our country, as Presi- 
dent of the United States. I found there was not that response just 
yet that wc want, and you are and we all realize that we all are proud 
of the fact that there has not been a President of the United States 
of America that has not been either a man that participated in that 
great Revolution, or who is not descended from somebody who par- 
ticipated in our great Revolution. Now that is a splendid heritage. 
Now I am done; others are to follow me. (Voices: Go on! Go on! 
Go on! Go on!) You have all been very good to me.' Now there 
is one thing that touched me very deeply, and I have attributed it to 
my gray locks and the fact that I have been identified with this organi- 
zation for so many years. (Voice: Because you are you!) And that 
is the kindly spirit that you have all evidenced towards me. I am 
simply a private citizen. I followed after some distinguished men — my 
friends Porter and Breckinridge and Logan and Greeley came after me, 
and then came my friend Pngsley. And by the bye, I want to tell you 
a little circumstance, a little incident, that happened between Pngsley 
and myself. You know Pngsley and I are good friends, and he is a 
generous, splendid fellow, but he evidenced at Buffalo a spirit that I 
did not exactly like. Everybody in Maryland, and I hope everybody 
in the United States, realizes one fact about me and that is that I love 
the women. (Laughter and applause.) (Voice: No doubt of it.) No 
doubt in the world. And I want to say to you as I said then, that I 
would not give one good, genuine woman for all of you. men. Upon 
that occasion I was sitting here at this anxious bench — and it is an 
anxious bench, I assure you — and before we got through I. noticed a 
whole lot of ladies come into the adjoining room, and I said to the 
gentleman sitting by rne, "I won't stay here when I see that attraction 
over there," and I went out into the other room and spent the balance 
of the evening with the ladies until it was my time to respond to a toast. 
Pugsley had to speak before I did and he referred to me in very slight- 
ing terms, and I told him he reminded me very much of an incident 
that happened with an old colored woman in our family who wanted 
to get a divorce. I had always said when I lost rny regard and my 



■ 



- 









THE BALTIMORE BANQUET 1 87 

taste and respect for the ladies I wanted to die. So this old woman 
came and said she wanted a divorce, and I said, "Why, what is the 
trouble? Does your husband support you all right?" "Oh, yes, yes." 
"Does he abuse you?" "Oh, no, sir; he is very kind and good to me." 
"He has not deserted you?" "No, indeed, sir; he is home every night." 
"Well," said I, "what in the world is the matter with you? You can't 
get a divorce on that. You tell me the whole truth." She said, "Well, 
Air. Edwin, to tell you the truth, I've just lost the taste for him!" 
(Laughter and applause.) So 1 told Pugslcy whenever I lost the taste 
for the ladies I wanted to die. Now I am done. I want to say that 
you have done us a great service by coming to Baltimore. You have 
done us a great service by making this one of the greatest Congresses 
that the Sons of the American Revolution has ever held. (Applause.) 
You have done us an honor by appreciating what the young men of this 
organization of ours have done for you and we appreciate it, and we 
hope some day or other that you will come back. You have been the 
means of increasing the membership of our organization, and I think 
if we keep on in the ratio that we have started out that we will get the 
medal next year. My friend Beardsley has the gratification of knowing 
that he has been elected by the largest vote that was ever cast for a 
President General of the Sons of the American Revolution. (Applause.) 
That is an honor, and I want to say to you that when he retires from 
office you will all say that he has made one of the best Presidents 
General that our Society has ever had. (Applause and three cheers.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITHER. 

Gentlemen : I want to say, as a Maryland man, I have never before 
appreciated the tremendous power of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion as I have in the last few minutes. I want to tell you that it is the 
first time in the time I have known Governor Warfield that I have heard 
him respond to a toast on the State of Maryland when he has forgotten 
so completely the State of Maryland and has talked about so many other 
subjects. It shows the wondrous power of this Congress, and I think 
after Ids confession here that his statement in the beginning of his 
speech was certainly out of order in every particular. I want to say to 
the ladies of Maryland who are here that T do not believe the statement 
is exactly correct that was made by the former President General from 
Maryland, that every member of this Congress brought his wife or his 
daughter with him because from their sincere affection for the ladies of 
Maryland, I think they must have left some of them behind. Now, he 
has told you, in most eloquent language, of what was done to restore 
that old Senate Chamber at Annapolis, ami in commemoration of that 
our Society has presented to you as a memento a photogravure of 
Washington resigning his commission at Annapolis, with the language 
of that historical address that he made on that occasion, and we want 
you to take it home with you and make it one of the mementos of this 
Congress. (Applause.) And now I want to say to you that he forgot 





















. 






1 88 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



to mention, when he was out West the last time, that lie received a 
distinguished consideration from one of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. He was nominated for President of the United States in 
1912. (Applause.) And we have with us tonight the gentleman who 
made that nomination, the original Warfield man of the United States. 
We will promise you Maryland for him anyhow. Now I am going to 
ask that gentleman to respond this evening in a few remarks to a 
toast that has been suggested by the eloquent remarks of our former 
President General from Maryland, lie ha; told you of the inspiration 
of this Society upon him and upon all members that come in contact with 
its glorious influence. I want to ask a former Vice-President General 
of this Society from the grand old State of Ohio, that makes Presidents, 
and therefore has the right to nominate them, to respond to a toast to 
America and Americanism and what this Society can do and has clone 
for this glorious old country of ours, and for that toast to America and 
Americanism and its relations to this Society I rail upon Mr. Richard- 
son, of Ohio, a former Vice-President General of this Society. (Ap- 
plause and three cheers for speaker.) 

ADDRESS BY JAMES M. RICHARDSON, OF OHIO. 



Mr. TOASTMASTIvR, COMPATRIOTS, DAUGHTERS 01? Till; AMERICAN REVO- 
LUTION, Ladies and GenteEmen : I have begun to realize within the 
last few moments what it is to follow your distinguished and beloved 
fornur Governor and former President General of this Society on an 
occasion of this kind. I begin to realize, too, that, when a man is put 
on as a substitute for one of the most distinguished speakers of the 
National Society to respond to his toast in this presence, he has a very 
large and, what is called out West, land-office contract. I wish to ex- 
press my sincere appreciation of the cordial words of 'your toastmaster. 
I wish also to express here and now my appreciation and that of my 
compatriots from the West of this magnificent entertainment, which has 
been afforded this National Congress by this great Maryland SocieLy. 
We have discovered that there is some certain subtle delicious mint- 
julepy flavor to this hospitality which you have accorded us which is 
entirely unique, and which places the Maryland Society beyond the 
consideration which we have accorded the Society in other States who 
have entertained us. Aud we thank you for 
which you have shown us true Maryland hosp 
Governor Warfield, whom I love and whose; 
ciety T appreciate, and whose distinguished career T am certain has not 
yet terminated (applause), that he has been maligned by one of our 
other distinguished compatriots for expressing his admiration for the 
ladies. Now, T want to give notice to Mr. Pugsley and to Governor 
Warfield that we will no longer tolerate the feeling in this National 
Society that these two gentlemen are alone authorized or are alone 
expected to express their sincere affection for the ladies. I want to say 



he magnificent manner in 
itality. T am reminded by 
great services to this So- 



Til JC BALTIMORE BANQUET 1 89 

to you now that we are off the reservation, and some of us are going 
on the war path after these two men. A man said to me today that this 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution was the greatest 
hereditary patriotic society in the United States. I thought about that 
and it reminded me of a dispute between two colored brethren as to the 
relative bigness of Barnum & Bailey's circus and Ringling Brothers' 
circus. Sam says, "Oh, Mose, Barnum & Bailey's is the greatest show 
on earth and I can prove it." So they went down to the bill board 
where it was displayed, posted to arrive on the first of September, and 
Sam says, "There, Mose ; there, you see it, 'Barnum & Bailey's, the 
greatest show on earth.' " And Mose says, "Sam, you don't read that 
right ; it says, 'Barnum & Bailey's, the greatest show on earth Sept. I.' " 
And the Sons of the American Revolution is the greatest hereditary 
patriotic society on earth "Sept. I," and that is the Society of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. (Applause.) And I say to you 
that I have stood in this Society, have ever stood, for union with the 
Daughters in the organization. In our Society, after we first organized 
this great National Society, it dawned upon us that it was not good for 
man to live alone or rather they brought it to our attention, for they 
knocked at our doors for admission, and for the life of me I don't see 
why we did not admit them. I suppose the ladies will admit that men 
as a rule don't know what is good for them. I remember of hearing of 
a man who had two wives, one at a time, of course. He lost the first 
one and he proceeded at once to erect to her memory a tablet bearing 
this tribute: "Tears will not bring thee back: Therefore I weep !" He 
wept until another wife dried his tears, and in the course of time, he 
passed over the river, when his remaining consort erected this touching 
tablet to his memory: "Rest in peace till I come." But I am here to- 
night to seek more than vindication for my fellow compatriots against 
the aspersions of Mr. Pugslcy and Governor Warfield. We all love the 
ladies, and we would not be good patriotic American citizens if it were 
not so. (Applause.) Gentlemen and ladies, the Governor has here 
referred in his eloquent address to the very enjoyable and very inspiring 
day which we spent together at Annapolis. Somehow or other the 
Governor's speech filled me all up. He is a citizen worthy of your 
admiration and of your affection. I think down in the bottom of 
Governor Warfield's heart there is more absolute sincere love for 
American institutions than in the heart of any other compatriot which 
we have. The fact is that I was impelled to come to Maryland on ac- 
count of the insistence of Governor Warfield a week ago at Columbus. 
But today at our meeting in Annapolis there we drank at the fountain 
of enthusiasm and of patriotism. There we recalled the sacred 
memories of that sacred past, which we are here to commemorate today. 
But while our visits to these historic spots should be and are an in- 
spiration to us, it should be an aspiration. It is not, my compatriots, 
that we should exist simply for the past. The mission of this Society 
is not only to keep in memory the men and the deeds which have made 



I90 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

this country great and powerful, but it is and has as an excuse for its 
existence the power of this organization to mold and fashion and create 
a public sentiment now, in this year of 1909, and for all future years in 
which we shall exert our activities as a vSociety to impress upon this 
country the absolute necessity of fostering patriotism and forever re- 
peating our solemn vows of allegiance to the flag which has protected 
us, and to the principles of the American Revolution. The time is 
short; the hour is far spent; I shall not take your time in speaking of 
the various and multitudinous conditions and problems which face us as 
a people, but we have insistently presented to us as citizens of the United 
States an insidious form of treason which is endeavoring to subvert 
and revolutionize our representative system of government. That one 
thing I wish to mention here tonight. That one thing I wish to im- 
press upon you as a thing to lie avoided, a tiling to be condemned, a 
thing to be warred against. We should not in this Society be partisan; 
we should be absolutely non-partisan, we should be absolutely non- 
sectarian, and we should be at all times patriotic Americans. The 
initiative and referendum, a pretended form o[ popular legislation, is a 
thing that we should condemn and that we should look out for. As 
Governor Black said recently, "Beware of the man who talks from the 
head of a barrel !" I insist that this subtle poison is getting into the 
body politic and should be looked out for, for direct legislation in op- 
position to representative legislation is a legislation by minorities and 
legislation by interested minorities who have axes to grind. It is legis- 
lation that can be handled by the thug and by the man who corrupts the 
electorate. Do you want to destroy the latest, the greatest republic? If 
you do, corrupt the electorate. It is a sipmle thing for a people to go 
down hill. It is a simple thing to destroy the republic which we have in- 
herited from our fathers. Destroy the altars of our religion, corrupt the 
ballot box, and the republic is doomed. Listen to the wise de Tocque- 
ville, "Morality, — morality is the safeguard of good government and 
religion is the only safeguard of morality." These words I leave with 
you. I thank you for your attention. (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITHER. 

GiCNTrjjMiCN : I am sure we have listened with pleasure to the words 
of wisdom that have come to us from the former Vice-President Gen- 
eral from Ohio; and no one can listen to them without realizing that the 
true interests of America and Americanism today consists in fighting 
for our institutions as strongly and loyally as in the past. But from 
Ohio it is only a short step — although in the olden days it might have 
been quite a long one — to almost its sister State of Illinois. Yes, even 
with the Sons of the American Revolution, the course of empire west- 
ward takes its way, and now I want to ask the former President General 
of this Society from the State of Illinois, former President. General 
McClary, to respond to a toast to the Sons of the American Revolution 
in the West, that western country that means (lie destiny of our Nation. 
I call upon him to respond to that toast. (Applause.) 



TIM', BALTIMORE BANQUET IQI 



ADDRESS BY NELSON A. McCLARY. 

Mr. TOASTM ASTER, Mr. PRESIDENT GENERAI,, COMPATRIOTS, I*ADlES, 

Daughters oi ? the American Revolution: I am not here volun- 
tarily. These seats have been referred to by Governor Warfielcl as the 
anxious seats, f did not wish to be an occupant this evening of one 
of these anxious seats. My preference was strongly to be with my own 
delegation over there at a central table, when: 1 might have an irre- 
sponsible good time. But I. am here in respon c to orders. After 
making as complete and full a protest as it was possible for me to put 
into writing, I received word thai I would have to stand, and when 
Judge Stockbridge says ''You must," why, I think that most of you 
have learned that you must. Jt reminds me of a story that a compatriot 
told last night in the corridors of this hold. Ii was of a little darky, 
who was plowing and sweating and working very hard, and when asked 
what he got for those serviees replied, "I don't get nothing for doing 
it, boss; but I get hell if I don't!" (Laughter and applause.) There- 
fore I am here. I don't want to get the latter thing. Of course, if I 
were entirely disinterested, I might be willing to stand here as a sort 
of a foil for the eloquent speakers who have preceded me, except that 
they need no foil. There is not a man among yon into whose faees 
I look that is not more capable of making a proper speech before a 
Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution than myself; but T 
am actually here, and must crave your indulgence. That reminds me 
of another— not a story, but a saying. You have heard it, probably: 
"Courtesy is voluntary attention to that which bores you!" Will 
you give me your courteous attention for the next five minutes? I 
guarantee that I will not fall-: more than five minutes at this late hour. 
I did not select the theme; Judge Stockbridge selected the theme. I 
might have don.- better— it was a second thoughl • ii should have 
been my first thought— if I had gotten him to write my p<- ch. 
However, it is a good subject; it is an inspiring subject: "Westward 
the star of empire takes its way." I believe the original was, "West- 
ward the course of empire takes its way," but I like the star. It is 
the insignia of virility, of progress, of patriotism, and idealism, and we 
must not lose our idealism. For some thousands of years the course 
of empire, the course of the star of empire, has been westward. You 
will remember Persia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Caul, Great Britain, and 
now America. The question for us to consider is, Will it stay with us? 
Will it pause here, or will it go on across the Pacific to where the West 
meets the East — to where those great nations with wonderful poten- 
tialities are now just awakening to their great power,? Or perchance 
will it turn southward to those great republics of South America, the 
relative importance of which we are ju I beginning to realize? Gen- 
tlemen, it rests with us whether or not it will continue with us. Under 
certain conditions it could not be snatched from us; under other condi- 
tions it will voluntarily drifl away from ms. If we preserve the ideals 



IQ2 SOiNS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

that have come down to us from our forefathers it will remain with 
us. If, in our great material prosperity, we forget or neglect these 
it will pass from us. Compatriots, we read of another star — also a 
star of empire — which "came and stood over the place where the 
young child was." Shall we, may we, term this the star of idealism? 
Perhaps we may. This star of idealism has moved for the last 2,000 
years in close conjunction with the mighty star of empire. If, with 
our material prosperity, we couple high idealism; if, with our wonder- 
ful progress, we remember our patriotism, then the star of empire will 
certainly remain over America, and we may paraphrase by saying, 
"Behold the star of empire — here to stay!" But -if we forget, if we 
are heedless of the still small voice, we will lose not only the high 
idealism but, compatriots, we will lose ultimately our material pros- 
perity. This is the point and the thought that we should bring home 
to ourselves ami it is a point and a thought" that I believe is pertinent, 
and I believe the importance of it is realized by every compatriot within 
the sound of my voice. This brings me to a practical suggestion. I 
suppose it was as a practical man that I was asked' to speak, and our 
idealism does not amount to much, gentlemen, unless it has a practical 
basis. Now it is very easy for us to wave our napkins and cheer 
splendid sentiments, but it amounts to — T was going to say absolutely 
nothing; perhaps it amounts to something, but very little, eery little, 
unless tomorrow morning, next week, next month we are prepared 
to do something. Now I am not going to ask you to do very much. 
You ought to be willing to do a great deal, because you gentlemen of 
the Sons of the American Revolution are direct descendants of the 
men who sacrificed their property, their comfort, their liberty, who 
suffered great hardship, who laid down their lives that this new nation 
might live. Remembering their sacrifices, arc we not willing to do a 
Hi lie, just a little? 

Now this organization of ours helps to keep alive our patriotism — 
helps to preserve to our descendants inspiring memories of the great 
actions and the noble ideals of their ancestors. It stands for all that is 
best and most disinterested in this Republic. It is doing important 
patriotic work' in several directions, but not enough — nut half enough. 
What it. is now accomplishing is but a small percentage of what it 
could and should do, or of what it would do if recruited to its proper 
strength. The little tiling which T now ask' of you is that you make 
it a potent instrumentality for the promotion of patriotism and of good 
citizenship that it can be made — complete its efficiency. We are al- 
ready well organized; we are splendidly distributed; we now have 
forty-five State Societies, including Hawaii, the District of Columbia 
and the Society of France, leaving but a few States unorganized. We 
have this year, under Judge Sloekbridgc's efficient leadership, added two 
new States. We will next year probably, as a result of work done 
during the past year, add two more States, which will leave, I believe, 
only two States in the United States not organized. We are non- 
sectional; we are non-sectarian; we are non-political; we have every 



. 















Tlllv UAI/riMOKlS BANQUUT 1 93 

advantage; we have a noble opportunity. We are only lacking in 
numerical strength; therefore the first thing is to multiply our mem- 
bership. It can be done. Look at the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, with 70,000 members. (Applause.) Sec our organization, 
splendid as it is, imcqualcd perhaps m personnel, but with a total 
membership of only 11,500. The first thing to do is to double that 
number. It can be done if each compatriot will bring in one new 
member. Now this seems easy; almost too easy; so easy that I am 
afraid you won't do it, but you should do it. I know of several com- 
patriots who for five years have brought an average of six members 
a year. We would be equal in numbers to the Daughters if all of 
the compatriots had done equally well. So my final word to you, com- 
patriots, is to go home, report this great Congress, report this wonderful 
enthusiasm, report the way in which we have been received in this 
splendid old State of Maryland, and then emphasize the necessity of 
building up our organization to at least 25,000 this next year. It is 
easy if you will do it. Do it! Don't resolve tonight to do it and forget 
it tomorrow morning. Go home; meet your members at the meeting 
at which you report this Congress. And, by the way, don't fail, don't 
fail to make a good, full, and complete report to your State Society 
of this Congress, and then ask for a rising vote and a pledge from each 
man to bring in during the coming year two members. It seems easy, 
but it is the first step to the higher idealism— idealism which will stay 
the star of empire in its course. Gentlemen, I appeal to you to do 
this thing. I thank you. (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITIIER. 

We have realized that the practical man is the idealist on this occa- 
sion, and tonight we want to call for another toast to the stars of this 
most momentous meeting. I feel that, as in the good old occasions 
of the past, we should rise by proper climax to the toasts that are to 
follow, and I am going now to propose a toast which represents the 
stars of this occasion, (he ideals that we all should strive for. I found 
in an old record that the glorious things that made us rejoice in our 
boyhood days was that history of the fairk-s — of that fairyland that 
was peopled with those wonderful beauties that inhabit every stream 
and every grove and made that fairyland the image of beauty that it 
always has been to every one of us, and 1 found that this fairyland 
disappeared in the early part of the sixteenth century, and il is told 
by the old record of that day that when they came to conclude why the 
fairies were driven out there were two reasons given for it: One that 
we had gotten down to such a serious idea of everything by virtue of 
the puritanism that existed that we could not have a fairy and the 
fairies all left us. But the other more profound reason given by the 
ancients was that the fairies were driven out by tobacco. Now in this 
day of ours, in this generation, we have discovered that the fairies have 
all come back, like the Pied Piper of ITamelin, with the tobacco smoke. 



194 



SONS OK 'I'm; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



They have gathered here tonight and we have them sealed all around 
us like the fairies of old. They come and we have with us a toast 
that we always should rejoice as Sons of the American Revolution to 
celebrate, and, even though Governor Warfield has spoken to 'you about 
Maryland, it is the one toast that we always unite with Maryland. 
And I feel that there is one time that we can unite fairies and the 
Empire State Society, and that toast I am going to propose. It is a 
toast that we can always rejoice in — the fairies of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, the Daughters themselves and their relations to 
the fairies, and I am going to call upon our sister State, the Empire 
State of New York, and former President General, the lion. Cornelius 
A. Pugsley, to respond to a toast on the fairies of this day — the ladies 
and their relations, to Maryland. 






ADDRESS BY MR. PUGSLEY. 

Mr. Toast ma st i;k, Ladik.s and G-IvNTi.f.mlcn : An Irishman asked for 
a day off that he might attend a wedding, lie appeared the next day 
with his clothes in tatters and a broken head. lie was asked how it 
happened; he replied, "And sure I met a man at the wedding that I 
didn't know, and I says to him, 'Who are yon?' And he says to me, 
'I am the best man,' and, be jabers, he was." (Applause.) After en- 
joying the gracious hospitality at Annapolis and at Baltimore of the 
Maryland Society, we say, those of us from tin! Empire State and from 
every other State of this grand old Union of ours, that Maryland is the 
best man. And Maryland always comes to the front. When you want 
a great battle fought and victory won at Santiago, the man that per- 
forms the 6c^<\ that makes his mime famous is Admiral Schley of 
Maryland. (Applause.) Reference has been made here tonight that I 
said something that ought not to have been said at Buffalo, but I want 
those who were not present at that time to know this, that all I said in 
regard to Governor Warfield was this : That he stated to me that he 
hoped to live to see that sweet day of which the prophet Isaiah speaks, 
"When seven women shall lay hold of one man!" (Laughter and 
applause.) (Voice: How about Dr. Parker?) Well, ladies and' gentle- 
men, with this splendid fringe of fairies about this banquet hall tonight 
I do not wonder that among those fairies is to be found the ex- 
President of the Massachusetts Society, Dr. Moses Greeley Parker. 
(Laughter and applause.) Why when we hold a banquet of the Sons 
of the American Revolution in Maryland, attended by such charming 
ladies as the Regent of the Buffalo Chapter (applause), I do not 
wonder that Dr. Parker should be among the ladies, and if I was not 
expecting to speak I would have been there also. (Applause.) I must 
confess, ladies and gentlemen, that I admire the tact and diplomacy of 
our worthy retiring President General, Judge Stockbridge. (Voice: We 
all dn.") In a most courteous letter he desired me to extend to Governor 
Plughes, of New York, an invitation to speak on this occasion, and in 



Til !■;. JJAI/i'lMUKl-: BANQUET 195 

case the Governor could not be present that I should take his place. 
He also gently hinted that ten minutes would be about right for the 
Governor, and I should imagine less for his substitute. He confirmed 
my own impression and belief that after-dinner speeches are a good 
deal like a wheel, "the longer the spoke the greater the tire." In ac- 
ceding to Judge Stockbridge's request, I first tried the Governor and 
then fell into the breach myself and surrendered to the conditions ex- 
isting. It is a pleasure to surrender, not alone to Judge S.tockbridge, 
but also to the far-famed beauty and charms of the ladies of Baltimore 
and Maryland, as well as to those from other States, who grace this 
banquet hall tonight. (Applause.) We are told that when Adam was 
alone in the Garden of Eden he fell into a profound sleep and while he 
slept a rib was taken from his side and created into woman for man's 
companion. I have no sympathy, however, with that cynic who said, 
"And thus man's first sleep became his last repose." (Laughter and 
applause.) My surrendering to Judge v Stockbridge and these ladies 
tonight reminds me of a Hessian who, in one of the battles of the 
Revolutionary War, was pursued by a Maryland soldier. The Hessian 
was running away as rapidly as he could when he happened to step upon 
a rake hidden in the grass. The handle flew up and hit him in the 
back of the head. He naturally supposed that the Marylander was upon 
him and fell upon his knees exclaiming, in broken English: "Mein 
Gott ! I surrender! Hurrah for liberty and the Continental Congress!" 
(Applause.) I believe today that women stand preeminent in our Na- 
tion and in all the Christian nations of the earth as one of the most 
potent factors in the up-building, the development, and the progress of 
mankind. (Applause.) It is she whose tender ministry by the cradle, 
in the home, and wherever she wills to exert her gentle influence, that 
makes for the uplift and the betterment of the individual and of na- 
tions (applause) ; and when we wish to give form or expression to 
Justice, to Charity, to Liberty, to Peace, or to any of the finer, loftier, 
more spiritual ideals, sentiments, and aspirations of the human race, we 
shape and mold them in the form and semblance of beautiful woman- 
hood. (Applause.) It may be that the women of this great country of 
ours shall have the right of suffrage within a few years, but whether 
she has or not her power is preeminent throughout the country. (Ap- 
plause.) My time, I think, is up. Your toastmaster says that I must 
have just a word to say about Maryland. (Voice: Ten words.) I want 
to thank Judge Stock-bridge for giving me ten minutes upon this de- 
lightful occasion, for it affords me an opportunity to congratulate him 
upon his splendid administration as President General, and also to 
congratulate my good friend Judge Beardsley, who was elected today. 
During my term of office, three men of this great Society, since elected 
Presidents General, rendered inestimable, invaluable service — Judge 
Stockbridge, Mr. McClary, and Judge Beardsley. They together drafted 
the new Constitution, which was adopted at the Denver Congress, and 
Judge Stockbridge penned the splendid pamphlet explaining American 



KjG SONS OF T I L I C AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

citizenship rind the principles of liberty, which has been adopted by the 

United States Government, and which is placed by our Government, as 
far as possible, in the bands of all immigrants coming to, our shores. 
I feel, compatriots, when the National Congress of the Sons of the 
American Revolution meets upon the soil of Maryland, and within 
the gates of your beautiful city of Baltimore, that be would be 
an unworthy son of Revolutionary sires of the Empire State who 
would not rejoice to meet with the descendants of the famous Four 
Hundred of the Maryland Line, who stood so invincibly upon the soil 
of New York in the Battle of Long Island to cover the retreat of the 
patriot army from their perilous position. With charge after charge 
they held the British foe until the patriot army was safe. Well did 
they win the proud title, ''The Bayonets of the Continental Army!" 
Their valor was like the valor of the Spartans at the Pass of Ther- 
mopylae, or the valor of the Light Brigade. But where they fought that 
clay and where their slain was buried there now stands a mighty city 
with its throbbing life, while above the graves of those heroes is the 
busy hum of a city's teeming streets. Well might we say with Long- 
fellow : 

"In the heart of the city they lie, unknown (but not), unnoticed. 
Daily the tides of life go ebbing and flowing beside them; 
Thousands of throbbing hearts, where theirs are at rest and forever; 
Thousands of aching brains, where theirs no longer are busy; 
Thousands of toiling hands, where theirs have ceased from their labors; 
Thousands of weary feet, where theirs have completed their journey." 

I never look upon that beautiful monument in Prospect Park, Brook- 
lyn, reared by the citizens of Maryland to commemorate the deeds of 
those heroes, but I glory in American valor and in the love of liberty 
which inspired those men to offer such a price for freedom and inde- 
pendence. I never look upon Stony Point, so near my own home on 
the banks of the beautiful Hudson, but I think of the valor of the 
Maryland Line and the valor of the Continental soldiers. Throughout 
the whole of our Revolutionary struggle, the Maryland troops stood 
preeminent, and well may we tonight upon Maryland soil join with you 
in honoring your heroic, your patriot dead. Compatriots, we need in 
this great country of ours, with .all the varied nationalities coming to 
our shores, men who will stand for the great principles for which Our 
fathers fought, Men who in their devotion to those principles will rise 
above party expediency in public life. Men who in all our great commercial 
enterprises will place honor and integrity above wealth and power. 
Men of the strong, sturdy fiber and coinage of the Maryland fathers 
who, in defense of (he principles fur which (bey stood ready to fight, 
said to the owner of (he "Peggy Stewart," who sought to violate those 
principles: "You must either go with us and apply the torch to your 
own vessel, or hang before your own door." We rejoice ("night in the 
ties of friendship and mutual interest that hind together the North and 
the South. I was very glad to bear from Governor Warfield tonight 



Till-) I i.M.T I MoKlC BANQUET 197 

that we stand, (lie North and the South, once more together. (Ap- 
plause.) We rejoice that we are now a reunited people with a common 
purpose and a common spirit. (Applause.) Passion and prejudice 
have gone with the years. We of the North clasp hands with those of 
the South, and, whether the descendants of the Cavaliers, the Puritans, 
the Dutch, or whatever nationality, we glory tonight in our American 
citizenship and in being Americans. (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITHER. 

Now, gentlemen, we propose a toast that is the next to the last we 
can offer. I propose a toast to the Sons of the American Revolution, 
and that toast is to he responded to by our President General-elect, 
Judge Beardsley. (Applause and three cheers for speaker.) 

ADDRESS BY MR. BEARDSLEY. 

Mr. ToASTMASTER, Ladies, and COMPATRIOTS: I shall make you no 
speech at this time of night. I am the son of God-fearing New England 
parents, and I have been taught to break the Sabbath as little as possi- 
ble. I am asked to speak of the future of our Society. Could it seem 
to me any otherwise than rose-colored as I look into the faces of those 
who have so signally honored me today and am surrounded by a coterie 
of beautiful ladies? Not only does the future of our Society look 
bright and rose-colored, but every future looks bright. You have chosen 
me this afternoon for the highest office in your gift. For twenty years 
this office has been held by a succession of remarkable men — men who 
have been ambassadors, governors of their States, judges in the highest 
courts, and captains of industry. Every one of these men that have 
preceded me have made good, and there has never been a year in the 
history of this organization that there has not been at least one great 
achievement charged up to its credit. Following in such a succession 
as that, no wonder that I doubt my own capacity. A few years ago, 
in New Haven, you allowed Connecticut to follow Massachusetts — the 
Puritan to follow the Cavalier. Now today history repeats itself again; 
Connecticut follows Maryland, and again the Puritan takes the place 
of the Cavalier; but it is not the austere Puritan of old, but modified 
by the mollifying influences of the succeeding years. And I want you 
to bear me witness that I am not the Puritan type that was the con- 
ception of St. Gaudens that stands in the park at Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and there are other differences between Deacon Chapin and 
myself besides the manner in which we wear our hair. This office of 
President General of the Sons of the American Revolution is a very 
important office and nobody appreciates it more than T, and I want to 
bear testimony that my friend Pugsley is right. We have our annual 
dinner on the 22d of February in each year. The year that he was 
President General of this Society he honored us with his presence. 
He made a most eloquent and beautiful speech; it was filled with the 



Kj)8 SONS 0l { TlLlC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

most beautiful prose and the loveliest poetry, and the refrain of one 
of his selections was "Give me men!" And, do you know, the influence 
of that in the State of Connecticut is such that there has been a very 
important secret society formed, composed entirely of ladies between 
certain ages, whose purposes are not entirely patriotic, having as their 
motto, "Give us men !" (Applause.) And their patron saint is Cor- 
nelius A. Pugsley. (Applause and laughter.) So much for the influ- 
ence of the President General. Now for the objects of our Society; 
just briefly to touch upon that. Of course our charter says they are 
threefold: they are patriotic, educational, and historical. The historical, 
of course, as you all know, covers the preservation of historical docu- 
ments and relics and the marking of historical sites. Through the 
efforts of our own Society and others this work has been largely done; 
it is being attended to. In our own State, Connecticut, we had a limited 
number of these, but such as they have have been marked. Under the 
head of education, of course, stands education among the foreigners, 
and that I will not dwell upon at this late hour at night. To be sure 
we have been prodigal of our privileges as we have been of our national 
resources, but we have the foreigners with us and we are going to 
prosecute our work. I want to say one word in seconding the sugges- 
tion of Mr. McClary, that we increase the number of our Society. That 
is absolutely necessary to us. We have an abundance of material today, 
for our forefathers were not all killed in the Revolution. A great 
majority of them survived. They married freely and extensively and 
lived to a very great age. There was no race suicide in that time. They 
married one wife after another, with but very little regard as to who 
should have him in the resurrection. And so, gentlemen, there is an 
abundance of material. But under the last head, patriotic, is the thing 
that comes home to us most. As they say of a prayer, its principal 
effect, its principal action, is on the pray-er. So with patriotism — it is 
what it makes of us. Eleven ye;!rs ago today Admiral Dc-wey, our 
compatriot, sailed into Manila Bay and sank the Spanish fleet. He 
made us a. world power and brought upon us our share of the white 
man's burden, but he modestly disclaimed all credit to himself and 
gave it to the man behind the gun. Now your President General, 
whoever he may be, can do very little unaided. He must depend on 
the rank and file of the Society. The failure or the success of the 
Society depends upon the man behind the badge. Whatever he is the 
Society will be. He should be enthusiastic. He should have the enthusi- 
asm of the college boy who can sit on the bleachers when his side goes 
down to defeat and can hurl the cry of his college. That is the kind 
of enthusiasm we want. And, gentlemen, we want to make our patriot- 
ism like our religion: we want to take it seriously. We want to be 
like Cromwell's soldiers, who, before they went into battle, knelt on 
their knees and asked the aid of God, and then when they rose they 
were invincible. That is the kind of men we want to be. And, gentle- 
men, we want to have the same spirit that the German soldiers hid 
after the battle, or the second day of the battle of Worth. They had 



Tl ! 1; J!.\ 1 ,T I M ORIS BA N Q U i',T 199 

fought through the first clay, and that night they lay on the held of 
battle wailing for the battle of the morrow. As the dawn broke a 
German officer who was awake saw a German soldier raise his head 
from a knapsack and start the first bars of Luther's hymn. Over here 
another soldier joined his voice and then another till all the air of 
that frosty morning resounded with that hymn, and then all was silent. 
Now when the battle was resumed that day there wasn't any question 
about the victory. Gentlemen, we want always to be in our business 
patriotic. As the toastmaster said in New York the other night, "We 
must be careful not to mistake the music of the stock ticker for the 
first violin • when the national orchestra plays 'My Country, "lis of 
Thee.' " Ue said, also, in speaking on that point, that he believed that 
if there had been brought into the New England town meeting the 
stock ticker there would not have been any tea thrown' over into Boston 
harbor; there would not have been any Saratoga and Yorktown, and 
we would still have been a British province. I remember a few years 
ago going on a trip to the North Cape, and in the town of Bergen in 
Norway there is a statue to that great musician, Ole Bull, lie is 
represented as standing with his violin poised in his hand and the bow 
raised, listening to the spirit of the Norwegian waterfall. And so we 
ought, as American citizens, in the busy pursuits of life and in the 
marts of commerce, to stop and pause for the still, small voice of 
patriotism. Let us remember that the motto of our life should be, 
"For God and for country." (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER GAITHER. 

We have one last toast to offer to you in behalf of the Maryland 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. We have had here 
tonight the President of the Society of the War of 18.12 and President 
of the Colonial Wars of this State. They have rejoiced with us in the 
inspiration of patriotism* that you have given us, and tonight, as the 
conclusion of this banquet, we want to ask you to listen to one more 
word from the Maryland Society, and that word properly comes from 
one you have most highly honored. We want to say to you that your 
visit to us has been a new birth of patriotism that will make our life 
in Maryland brighter and greater in the future than it ever has been 
in the past, and we believe that we will become one of the great insti- 
tutions of our country. And on behalf of the Maryland Society we 
want to say to you "Au revoir!" and "Auf wiedersehn!" Come again 
to meet with us. And we want to have these words spoken to you by 
a gentleman whom you have honored, our retiring President General 
of this Society, Judge Stockbridge, of Maryland. (Applause and three 
cheers for the speaker.) 

ADDRESS BY HENRY STOCKBRIDGE. 

Mr. Toastmaster, Compatriots, Ladies: I shall not attempt at this 
hour in the evening any extended remarks. I simply wish to give you 






200 SON'S Oi< T.IUC AMERICAN UUVOI/UTION 

one thought suggested to me in the words which have come- from other 
speakers this evening, and which cannot be too deeply impressed upon 
you, and then to bid you good night. You 'nave just heard frorri him 
who has been today elected your President General to direct the desti- 
nies of this organization for the ensuing year. I wish to bespeak for him 
the same ready, spontaneous, and effective aid and cooperation which 
have been so generously extended to me in the twelve months which 
have closed. If you will do that, one year from tonight we shall have 
occasion to celebrate the most successful year in our history, when we 
complete our twenty-first year and are fully of age. There is another 
matter: ] wonder bow far we realize the extent of the personal re- 
sponsibility which rests upon every individual member of this organiza- 
tion with regard to what he owes to this country, not merely in the way of 
rhetoric, not merely in contributions when the campaign comes around, 
but in constant daily work as he moves about his regular occupations. 
Turn to the composition of our land, a Nation of over seventy millions 
of people, extending from an ocean upon the one side to an ocean upon 
the other, aye, and beyond the isles of the sea; note the heterogeneous 
composition of that population, the diverse influences under which these 
men have been reared; trained not in the principles of self-government 
which have been learned at their mothers' knee, and then we realize the 
duty which rests upon us as a nation, not only to our own body politic, 
but also through the influence which it shall exert upon this great round 
world. And to what element of the population of the United States can 
we as confidently, as fittingly, look as to those who proudly acclaim the 
fact that it was their ancestors that made a government of the people 
possible upon this earth. And that reminds me of a little story: A 
couple of weeks ago a lady of this city and her little daughter paid a 
visit to Mount Vernon. The child was extremely interested in what 
she saw, and as she approached the tomb of Washington and clasped 
the iron bars within her hands and tried to peer into, aye, with her 
common eyes to penetrate the sarcophagus itself, and failed, she turned 
away disappointed* She was musing on the way home and finally 
turned to her mother and she said, ''Mamma, papa is a Son of the 
Resolution, isn't he? I guess if I bad told them that they would have 
let me looked in, wouldn't they?" Now, her childish mistake has an 
element of thought for us that it is well to cherish. There is not a 
great deal of difference between the Sons of the American Revolution 
and the Sons of the American Resolution. (Applause.) And what 
this organization wants today is a resolution carried into effective action 
to make this the greatest, the most beneficent nation upon which the sun 
has ever shone (applause), beneficent not only for our own citizens, but. 
in its effect sending a spark which shall be felt by the millions of 
people today to whom the words of freedom and liberty are unknown. 
The seed is here if we will couple the will, the resolution, with the act. 
This thought I would leave with you, and in conclusion, gentlemen, 1 
only wish to say on behalf of the Maryland Society that it has been 



THIS BAI/TIMORE BANQUET 201 

to us a great pleasure to have you gathered here upon the hanks of the 
Patapsco. It has been to us, as has been well said, an inspiration. ] 
assumed twelve months ago a labor fearful of the responsibilities 

which it entailed. 1 transfer it now to broader shoulders, hut, as I am 
not a launal naturalist, I am not going to take to the woods. 1 am 
going back where I love to he, right in the ranks, to work with each 
and every member of this organization (applause) (Voice: That's the 
stuff), to make real and possible the principles for which it is organized 
and for which it must, and I believe will, continue to work and grow 
year by year in increasing power and increasing usefulness. (Ap- 
plause.) And now, gentlemen, you have been very kind to us in your 
expressions of good will. To you let us say from the depths of our 
hearts, we thank you for your kind words; we appreciate your presence; 
we esteem you personally. The friendships which have been cemented 
here will long be cherished and remembered, and may the days not be 
long or far distant when you will again be glad to come to the shores 
of the Chesapeake and revivify still further the spirit for which this 
organization was formed. (Applause.) 






202 SONS OF TLIK AMERICAN RICVOT^UTION 



MEETINGS OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES. 



PROCEEDINGS OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, SEPTEMBER 

26, 1908. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee, duly called by order of the 
President General, was held at the Hotel Belmont, New York City, at 
1.30 p. m., September 26, 1908. 

Present: President General Stockbridge who presided, Mr. McClary, 
Mr. Beardsley, Commander Moore, Dr. Parker, Mr. Richardson, and 
the Secretary General. Regrets were received from Mr. Marble, who 
was unable to attend. 

The minutes of the meeting held May 2 in Buffalo, printed in the 
OFFICIAL Bui^f/TIN for May, 1908, were approved. 

The President General, acting under authority granted by the Execu- 
tive Committee at its meeting of May 2, reported that he had com- 
municated with the American Federation of Musicians and other 
organizations of musicians and with about fifty publishers of music 
throughout the country urging them to omit from all medleys played by 
bands or orchestras, "The Star Spangled Banner" or strains taken 
from it, and to encourage on all appropriate occasions, the rendering 
of the national anthem as a separate and distinct feature. Favorable 
replies were being received from several publishers. The American 
Federation of Musicians at its convention in St. Fouis, May n-16, 1908, 
adopted a resolution requesting the leaders of all hands and orchestras 
to comply with this suggestion. The Federation also adopted a reso- 
lution requesting the Sons of the American Revolution to use all 
patriotic means to have restored to common use, especially in text 
books of the public schools, the third stanza of the Star Spangled Ban- 
ner (beginning "And where is that band," etc., etc.,) and to preserve 
intact the national anthem as it was written by Francis Scott Key. 

On motion the Committee voted that expression of appreciation of 
the Federation's action be communicated to that organization. 

A letter was received from Thomas R. Shipp, Secretary of the Na- 
tional Conservation Commission, requesting that the proper officer be 
designated to receive material with reference to the conservation of the 
country's natural resources, in which the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion might be interested. Secretary General Clark was designated to 
receive communications from this Commission. 

Acting on a letter from a compatriot concerning the proper loca- 
tion of statues of John Paul Jones and John Barry, in the city of Wash- 
ington, it was voted that the Executive Committee express to the 
Secretary of War the hope that the statues be not placed in Franklin 
Square, but that a more eligible or suitable site be selected such as the 
Naval Observatory circle. 

■ 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 203 

Reports were received from Dr. Guyer, Chairman of the Committee 
on Organization in the West and Major Tcbbetts, Chairman of the 
Committee on Organization in the South, showing progress in the 
formation of new societies in New Mexico, North Dakota, Mississippi, 
Georgia, and South Carolina. Acceptable papers have been filed in 
considerable number by applicants in these States. 

The Secretary General announced that three hundred new members 
had been registered since May 1, showing an increase over the registra- 
tion during the same period last year. 

Dr. Parker, chairman, reported for the Committee on Local Chapters, 
that information was being gathered as to the present condition of the 
Chapters in the several States. In view of the importance of this work 
it was voted that Mr. McClary and Commander Moore be added to this 
committee, and the Committee was requested to present definite recom- 
mendations, if possible, for consideration at the next meeting of the 
Executive Com unit tee. 

The President General submitted fur consideration a scries of ques- 
tions to be sent to State Societies, calling for information as to work 
accomplished by them since their organization. The form of questions 
was adopted and ordered to be printed and communicated to State 
Secretaries. 

Commander Moore, Chairman of the Committee on Information for 
Aliens, reported that leaflet number two, entitled Naturalization of 
Aliens in the United States, telling in simple language, How to Become 
Citizens, What is Required, and Rights and Duties, had been printed 
in English in an edition of fifteen thousand copies. Arrangements were 
being made for its translation into various languages and its general 
distribution. 

It was voted that mention be made in the next Official Bui.t.ftin 
of leaflets numbers one and two on information for aliens and the 
methods of their distribution. 

The Secretary General reported that in compliance with direction of 
the Buffalo Congress, standard blank forms for State Society reports 
had been prepared and issued and that voucher blanks had been dis- 
tributed to State Treasurers for use in payment of accounts to the 
National Society. 

It* was voted that the printing of official notices be continued in 
future numbers of the Official BULLETIN. 

The President General was requested to prepare a special letter to 
' members of the Society for publication in the October issue of the 

Ol'KTCTAT, BuT.T.IvTIN. 

The Secretary General reported that, under authority granted by the 
Buffalo Congress, the OFFICIAL BULLETIN for May had been distributed 
to all members of the Society by mail direct from Washington, and that 
future numbers would be distributed in the same manner without ex- 
pense to State Societies or to members. 

An appropriation not to exceed one hundred dollars was voted for the 



204 



SONS 01- TIIlv AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



use of the Flag Committee, General Vincent, chairman, for printing and 
other necessary expenses. It was announced that the Flag Committee 
would use every effort to secure the enactment by the House of Repre- 
sentatives of Senate Bill 565, passed May 20, 1908, to prevent and 
punish the 'desecration, mutilation, or improper use of the Hag of the 
United States of America. 

The Committee then, at 6.30 o'clock, adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, FEBRUARY 

25, 1909. 

A meeting of the National Executive Committee, duly called by direc- 
tion of the President General, was held at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, 
New York city, at 2 o'clock p. m., February 25, 1909. Those present 
were President General Henry Stockbridge, who presided, and ex- 
President General Nelson A. McClary, Commander John 1 1. Moore, 
U. S. Navy, Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, Mr. Morris B. Beardsley, Presi- 
dent Cornelius A. Pugsley, of the Empire State Society, representing 
Mr. W. A. Marble, who was absent in the South, and Secretary General 
A. Howard Clark. A letter was received from Mr. Richardson, of 
Ohio, who was unable to attend. 

The minutes of the Executive Committee meeting, held September 26, 
1908, were approved as printed in the Official Bulletin for October, 
1908. 

On motion by Mr. McClary, duly seconded, it was voted that statisti- 
cal reports received from State Societies, in response to the circular of 
October 28, issued by order of the Executive Committee, and calling for 
record of patriotic work accomplished since the organization of each 
Society (described on page 7 of the December Official Bulletin), be 
referred to the Historian General to be digested and reported to the 
Baltimore Congress, and that the Secretary General request State So- 
cieties that have not sent reports to forward them promptly to the His- 
torian General; the State reports to be returned to the Secretary Gen- 
eral for future reference. 

, On motion by Doctor Parker, duly seconded, it was voted that the 
Secretary General be instructed to insert on the second page of applica- 
tion blanks, spaces for dates of birth, marriage, and death of each 
ancestor in each generation, ami that on the third page be added thf 
statement that "membership is based upon one original claim; when the 
applicant derives eligibility by descent from more than one ancestor, and 
it is desired to take advantage thereof, separate applications, to be 
marked 'Supplemental application,' should be made in each case and 
filed with the original." 

The President General announced that a charter had been iVued to 
the New Mexico Society, organized at Albuquerque on December 26, 
1908, and that charters had been prepared for issuance to new Societies 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 205 

in Mississippi and Idaho, through the Committee on Organization. The 
action of the President General was thereupon approved by the Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Commander Moore reported that 100 bronze copies of the prize essay 
medal, first issued by the National Society in 1895, in silver and gold, 
for award to colleges, had, by authority of the President General, been 
struck and are furnished by the Secretary General for general use by 
State Societies at a cost of two dollars each, including a seal-skin medal 
case. The Executive Committee approved the above action. 

The President General submitted a preliminary program for the 
Baltimore Congress, and it was approved. 

On motion by Commander Moore, the Secretary General was in- 
structed to note, as application papers are received, whether the appli- 
cant is a present or past member of another State Society, and if so 
such fact shall be communicated to the new Society before registration. 

President Pugsley extended an invitation to the members of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee to be the guests of the Empire State Society at its 
annual banquet that evening at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, and, on 
motion by Mr. Bcard.dey, the invitation was accepted with the thanks 
of the Committee. 

Mr. Pugsley submitted, in behalf of the Empire State Society, a pro- 
posal which had come before that Society that a military company be 
organized under the auspices of the National Society. Consideration of 
the plan was, on motion, postponed until the next meeting of the Com- 
mittee. 

Doctor Parker, Chairman of the Committee on Chapters, reported 
that at the September meeting of the Executive Committee there had 
been referred to the Committee on Chapters the draft of a plan of re- 
organization (see March BuLUCTiN, p. 5) with request that definite 
recommendations on the general subject of local Chapters be presented, 
if practicable, for consideration of the Executive Committee at its 
present meeting. The Committee reported that it does not recommend 
the adoption of the proposed changes in the Constitution. It does, 
however, submit certain recommendations as being in line with the 
purposes of the proposed changes. A tabulated statement, forming part 
of the full report of the Committee to the Baltimore Congress, shows 
that 75 Chapters in 17 State Societies have an aggregate of 2,180 
members. 

The Executive Committee, after considering the recommendations of 
the Chapter Committee, voted to concur in the same and voted that it 
docs not deem it expedient to recommend to the next Congress any 
changes in the Constitution. The Chapter Committee recommendations 
are as follows : 

1. Your Committee would recommend to those State Societies that 
have no fixed annual dues to establish such dues as Rf>on as practicable 
at a minimum of $1.50, while the annual dues of the National Society 
are 50 cents, thus making the minimum State lee $1.00 and National 
Society fee 50 cents. 

2. That the Chapters be officially recognized by the State Societies, if 



20G SON'S OF Till- AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

practicable, by making the Presidents of Chapters of a specified size ex 
officio members of the State Board of Managers. 

3. That a standing committee of the National Society be appointed to 
advise the State Societies with reference to State and Chapter organiza- 
tion, to be known as the Advisory Committee on Chapters. 

The Committee on Information for Aliens, Commander Moore, Col- 
onel Lyman, and A. Howard Clark, reported that the United States 
Department of Commerce and Labor has approved leaflet No. 2, "Natu- 
ralization of Aliens in the United States," and that it is being translated 
into several foreign languages. 

On motion, the report of the Committee was accepted. 

The Secretary General announced the death at Columbus, Ohio, on 
January 10, 1900, of Rev. Rufus W. Clark, Chairman of the Committee 
on Education, and former Chaplain General of the National Society. 
Tributes to the memory of Doctor Clark, adopted by the Ohio and 
Michigan Societies, were announced to the Executive Committee, and 
formal action by the National Society was deferred until the Baltimore 
Congress. 

The President General announced that Col. Charles Lyman had been 
appointed Chairman of the Committee on Education to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Doctor Clark. 

Mr. McClary, in general charge of organization work, stated that the 
committees on organization of new State Societies report good progress. 
A Society was formed in New Mexico on December 26, and early 
organization is looked for in Idaho and North Dakota. In Mississippi 
the required number of eligible applicants has been secured, and a 
charter has been prepared for issuance as soon as organization is per- 
fected. Early formation of a Society is also expected in Georgia. 

The Secretary General reported that there has been a registration of 
800 new members since the Buffalo Congress — a considerable increase 
over the same period in several past years. 

There being no further business the Committee adjourned at C p. m. 

A. Howard Cl,ark, 

Secretary General 

PROCEEDINGS OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, APRIL 29, 1909. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee, duly called by order of the 
President General, was held at the Hotel Belvedere, Baltimore, at 9 
p. m., April 29, 1909. Present: President General Stockbridge, who 
presided; Mr. McClary, Mr. Bcardsley, Commander Moore, Mr. Mar- 
ble, Doctor Parker, Mr. Richardson, and the Secretary General. The 
minutes of the meeting of February 25 were approved as printed in 
the OFFICIAL Bulletin for March, 1909. Various matters were inform- 
ally discussed, but no formal action was taken. Mr. Chester M. Clark 
was appointed to serve as Assistant Secretary General during the ses- 
sions of the Baltimore Congress. The Committee adjourned at II 
o'clock p. m. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 207 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, APRIL 30, 

1909. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees, duly called by order of the 
President General, was held at the Hotel Belvedere, Baltimore, at 9 
a. m., April 30, 1909. Present : President General Stockbridge, who 
presided; Vice-Presidents General Bates, Guyer, and Howe; Secretary 
General Clark; Treasurer General Secor; Historian General Watkins; 
General Anderson, of Virginia; Colonel Guthrie, of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Pettengill, of Maine; Mr. Ames, of California; Mr. Marble, of New 
York; Mr. Dewey, representing Vermont; Mr. Eaton, representing 
Michigan;' Doctor Parker, of Massachusetts, and others. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Trustees held at Buffalo, N. Y., 
on May 1, 1909, were approved as printed in the Official Bulletin and 
in the National Year Book. 

On motion by Mr. Pettengill, the action of the President General and 
of the Executive Committee, in granting charters in the name of the 
Trustees to new State Societies organized in New Mexico on Decem- 
ber 26, 1908, and in Idaho on April 8, 1909, and to applicants for a 
Society in Mississippi, was ratified and confirmed. 

Doctor Guyer, Chairman of the Committee on Organization in the 
North and West, reported on the recent organization in Idaho and on 
work in North Dakota and other States. 

Secretary General .Clark, member of the Committee on Information 
for Aliens, reported on the distribution of leaflets Nos. 1 and 2. 

On motion by Mr. Dewey, it was voted that the report from the 
Executive Committee, as to matters transacted at its meetings on May 
2 and September 26, 1908, and on February 25, 1909, be approved. 

There being no further business, the meeting of the Board adjourned 
at 9.45 o'clock. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, MAY 1, 1909. 

A meeting of the new Board of Trustees elected at Annapolis, Md., 
May 1, T900, duly called by the President General, was held at the Hotel 
Belvedere, Baltimore, at 6 p. m., May 1. Present : President General 
Beardsley, who presided; President E. B. Moore, of the District of 
'Columbia Society; Mr. Ames, of California; President Pngsley, of the 
Empire State Society; Vice-President General Guyer; Colonel Guthrie, 
■of Pennsylvania; President Curtis, of Connecticut; Mr. Stockbridge, of 
Maryland; Mr. Wentworth, of Iowa; Plistorian General Watkins, 
Treasurer General Burroughs, and Secretary General Clark. 

The President General nominated the following Executive Committee, 
rand, on motion by Mr. Pugsley, the nominations were approved : 

Morris B. Beardsley, President General, Chairman ex officio. 

Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland. 



2o8 sons of the American revolution 

Nelson A. McClary, of Illinois. 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., of District of Columbia. 

William A, Marble, of New York. 

Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., of Massachusetts. 

Lewis Beers Curtis, of Connecticut. 

The selection of place of meeting for the Twenty-first Annual Con- 
gress in 1910 was referred to the Executive Committee. 

It was voted that the present plan, of printing and distributing the 
Official Bulletin under the direction of the Secretary General be ap- 
proved and continued, and that an appropriation of $1,800 be made for 
the expenses thereof. 

An appropriation not to exceed $1,000 was voted for printing and 
distributing the National Year Book for 1909, and the Secretary General 
was authorized to condense the contents as may be deemed advisable 
with the approval of the President General. 

An appropriation not to exceed $1,500 was voted for the printing and 
distribution of leaflets Nos. 1 and 2, under the direction of the Commit- 
tee on Information for Aliens. 

An appropriation of $75, or so much thereof as may be necessary, was 
voted for printing and incidental expenses of the Committee on Educa- 
tion, subject to the approval of the President General. 

It was voted that the time of transfer of certain funds of the Society 
from present interest-bearing accounts be left to the judgment of the 
Treasurer General and the President General. 

It was voted that the question of continuance of special committees be 
referred to the Executive Committee. 

It was voted that the President General be authorized to refer to the 
Executive Committee for their action any matters not acted upon by 
the Trustees and such new business as in the judgment of the Presi- 
dent General may not require the action of the Board. 

The Secretary General was authorized to have manufactured a new 
supply of medals to be awarded to members for service in the War with 
Spain, subject to the approval of the President General. 

It was voted that the necessary expenses and the salary of the Secre- 
tary General and Registrar General be paid as during the past year. 

There being no further business, the Board then, at 7 o'clock p. m.,. 
adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

PROCEEDINGS OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, MAY 2, 1909. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee, duly called by the President 
General, was held at the Hotel Belvedere, Baltimore, at 9 a. m., May 2, 
1909. Present: President General Beardsley, who presided; Mr. Stock- 
bridge, Mr. McClary, Commander Moore, Mr. Marble, Doctor Parker, 
Mr. Curtis, and the Secretary General. 



PROCEEDINGS 01' THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 20Q 

A letter from Hon. E. B. Wilcox, a member of the Society, resident 
in Porto Rico, referred to the Committee by the Congress, was read and 
the President General was authorized to appoint a committee to cor- 
respond with Mr. Wilcox and to determine to what extent it may be 
practicable to (proceed toward the organization of a Society in Porto 
Rico, or how far it may be possible to operate through the schools in 
advancing American patriotism in the way proposed by him. 

It was voted that the place of meeting of the Congress of 19 ro be re- 
ferred to President General Beardsley, Mr. Curtis, and Mr. Marble as a 
special committee. 

It was voted that the President General be empowered to act for the 
Executive Committee in matters not already acted upon that may need 
attention after the full proceedings of the Baltimore Congress and of 
the Trustees' meeting on May 1 and the meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee on May 2 had been written up. 

It was voted that condensation of reports of officers and of State 
Societies for publication in the National Year Book be left to the dis- 
cretion of the Secretary General. 

It was voted that until otherwise decided there be no further setting 
up or making electrotype blocks of leaflet No. 2 in foreign languages. 

It was voted that the draft of a constitution proposed for the use of 
new State Societies and for the possible improvement of present Socie- 
ties be submitted to each member of the Executive Committee for 
examination before publication. 

The Secretary General was authorized to announce that, beyond the 
regular distribution, such copies of National Year Books as are avail- 
able will be supplied to members on payment of postage. 

A resolution from the Delaware Society, calling upon the Congress of 
the United States to publish the muster and pension rolls of the Revolu- 
tionary War, was referred to the Special Committee on Pension and 
Muster Rolls. 

A resolution referred to the Executive Committee by the Congress as 
to status of members not in good standing in State Societies was con- 
sidered and on motion was laid on the table. 

It was voted that the present special committees be continued. 

The Committee then, at 10.30 o'clock a. m., adjourned. 

A. I-Ioward Clark, 

Secretary General. 

SOCIAL FUNCTIONS AT BALTIMORE CONGRESS. 

The Maryland Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and 
the Maryland Chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution 
provided most lavishly for the social entertainment of delegates and 
guests attending the Baltimore Congress. Well-organized committees 
carried out special features with perfect success. At noon on April 30 
there was a bounteous luncheon in the assembly-room of the Hotel 
Belvedere, so there was no dispersing of members or loss of time at 

14 



210 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

the recess. The ladies were at the same time entertained by Mrs. Henry 
Stockbridge at Colonial Hall, the building of the Colonial Dames of 
America. In the evening of the same day the Maryland Daughters 
tendered an elaborate reception to the delegates, guests, and ladies at 
the Hotel Belvedere. 

Saturday morning the entire Congress, by special train, went to An- 
napolis, where an infantry drill was given by the midshipmen of the 
U. S. Naval Academy, and various historic places were visited. At 
noon a luncheon was provided at the Executive Mansion, where all were 
cordially received by Governor Crothers. At 2 o'clock a session of the 
Congress was held in the State House. The party returned to Balti- 
more by special train late in the afternoon. 

Saturday evening the delegates were the guests of the Maryland 
Society at a most elaborate banquet in the ball-room of the Belvedere, 
participated in by more than three hundred delegates and members, 
and at the same time about a hundred ladies of the party and Maryland 
Daughters were given a banquet in the adjacent assembly hall. 

Gen. Clinton L. Riggs, Vice-President of the Maryland Society, intro- 
duced Hon. George R. Gaither, President of the Society, as toastmaster, 
who welcomed the compatriots of the Congress and spoke of the deeds 
of Maryland in the Revolution. The speakers of the evening and their 
subjects were as follows: Col. Charles Lyman, of the District of Colum- 
bia, "Educational Work of the Society" ; ex-President General Governor 
Edwin Warfield, "Maryland" ; Mr. J. M. Richardson, of Ohio, "America 
and Americanism"; ex-President General Nelson A. McClary, of Illi- 
nois, "The Society in the Great West"; ex-President General Cornelius 
A. Pugsley, "Ladies and Maryland"; President General Judge Morris A. 
Beardsley, of Bridgeport, Conn., "The Future of the Society"; and 
retiring President General Judge Henry Stockbridge. 



L 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 

ENROLLED FROM MAY 1, 1908, TO APRIL 30, 1909. 

(Continued from 1908 Year Book.) 



ALABAMA SOCIETY. 

FRANCIS T. PARKER, Mobile, Ala. (19632). Son of Francis S. and Lillie B. 
(Troost) Parker; grandson of Francis S. and Mary T. (Lance) Parker; great- 
grandson of John and Emily (Rutledge) Parker; greal--grandson of John and 
(Smith) Rutledge; great 3 -grandson of John Rutledge, Delegate to Conti- 
nental Congress and Governor of South Carolina; great--grandson of John and 
Susannah (Middleton) Parker; great-grandson of Henry Middleton, Member 
of Continental Congress. 

TROOST PARKER, Mobile, Ala. (19633). Son of Francis S. and Lillie B 
(Troost) Parker; grandson of Francis S. and Mary T. (Lance) Parker; great 
grandson of John and Emily (Rutledge) Parker; great--grandson of John Rut 
ledge, member of Continental Congress; great 2 -grandson of John and Susanna! 
(Middleton) Parker; greats-grandson of Henry Middleton, member of Con 
tinental Congress, President of South Carolina Provincial Congress. 

ROBERT BURCI-I ROBINSON, Auburn, Ala. (19634). Son of John Evans and 
Isadore (Burch) Robinson; grandson of John Evans and Sarah (Ramey) Rob- 
inson; great-grandson of Randall Robinson, private, Colonel Waters's South 
Carolina Rcgt. ; grandson of Robert Simms and Martha Spear (Reid) Burch; 
great-grandson of Girard and Susan (Simms) Burch; great--grandson of 
Robert Simms, private, Capr. John Dickinson's Company North Carolina 
troops. 

APPEETON HAIRSTON STAPLES, Havana, Cuba (Ala. 19635). Son of John 
Norman and Mary Dawes (Appleton) Staples; grandson of George Dawes and 
Catherine (Hough) Appleton; great-grandson of Charles II. and Hannah 
(Dawes) Appleton; grcat 2 -grandson of Thomas Dawes, Colonel First Boston, 
Mass., Regt. and Member Committee of Correspondence. 

ALFRED EDGAR WHITE, Mobile, Ala. (19631). Son of George J. and Pauline 
(de Vended) White; grandson of Isaac and Lucy (Hoult) White; great-grandson 
of Christopher White, private, Colonel Noyes's Rhode Island Regt., pensioned. 

ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

EDDIE WYLIE YATES, Globe, Arizona (18789). Son of Paul Christian and 
Alice (Levy) Yates; grandson of John Marshall and Virginia (Christian) Yates; 
great-grandson of Paul and Mary King (Sutten) Christian; great 2 -grandson of 
John Christian, Captain Virginia Militia. 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

WIL'LIAM HERVEY BAILEY, Los Angeles, Cal. (20154). Son of Edward and 
Caroline (Hubbard) Bailey; grandson of James and Elizabeth (Gleason) Bailey; 
great-grandson of James Bailey, Sergeant, Colonel Brewer's and other Mass. 
Regts., pensioned. 

HERBERT BROWNING BEMIS, Berkeley, Cal. (20152). Son of Arthur C. and 
Lois L- (Browning) Bcmis; grandson of Edwin A. and Julia D. (Watson) 
Bemis; great-grandson of Robert and Lydia (Watson) Watson; great 2 -grandson 

2ir 



212 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

of Robert Watson, private, Capt. Ebenezer Mason's Company Mass. Minute 
Men, April 19, 1775; great-grandson of Samuel Watson, Sergeant Leicester 
(Mass.) Company of Minute Men, April 19. + 775- 

EDWARD MARCELLUS BIXBY, San Francisco, Cal. (i9443>. Son of Marcellus 
and Mary Amanda (Gould) Bixby;. grandson of Amasa and Fannie (Weston) 
Bixby; great-grandson of Solomon Dixby, private, Jacob Davis's Mass. Regt.; 
great-grandson of Samuel Dixby, private, Ebenezer Lcarned's Mass. Regt.; 
grandson of John and Lucy Taylor (Woods) Gould; great-grandson of Silas 
Gould, private, Fbenezer Bridge's Mass. Regt. 

ERNEST CHAPPELL BONNER, Alturas, Cal. (19435)- Son of John Heath and 
Emeline (Claflin) Bonner; grandson of Ira and Hannah Wells (Richardson) 
Claflin; great-grandson of Nathan and Ruth Colton (Trash) Claflin; great- 
grandson of Daniel Claflin, drummer, Colonel Woodbridgc's Mass. Regt. 

EZRA BAILEY BULLOCK, Alameda, Cal. (20103). Son of John IT. and Olive 
(Bailey) Bullock; grandson of John and Harriett (Shumvray) Bullock; great- 
grandson of John Bullock, Commander of Mass. privateer "Spy." 

HECTOR ROBINS BURROUGHS, San Francisco, Cal. (19444)- Son of Henry 
Benson and Rebecca (Robins) Burroughs; grandson of Charles and Lydia Ann 
Burroughs; great-grandson of John Burroughs, private Third Battalion Nevr 
Jersey Line. 

GEORGE WANTON ELLERY, San Francisco, Cal. (20157). Son of George 
Wanton and Mary Ann (Beard) Fllcry; grandson of George Wanton and Mary 
(Goddard) Fllcry; great-grandson of William Cilery, Signer of Declaration of 
Independence. 

WILLIAM ELLERY, San Francisco, Cal. (20160). Son of George Wanton and 
Mary Ann (Beard) Fllcry; grandson of George Wanton and Mary (Goddard) 
Fllcry; great-grandson of William- Ellcry, Signer of Declaration of Independ- 
ence. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON FIFE, Oakland, Cal. (20158). Son of William Hutchinson 
and Harriet Anna (Johnson) Fife ; grandson of John Allen and Mary Eliza 
(Eddy) Johnson ; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Allen) Johnson ; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Allen, private, Col. Seth Warner's Vermont Regt., 
pensioned. 

CLIFFORD ARNOLD FULLER, Oakland, Cal. (20153). Son of Aaron and 
Elizabeth (Simmons) Fuller; grandson of Obcd and Rachel (Preston) Fuller; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Fuller, private Bristol County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FRANK WHEELER MARSTON, San Francisco, Cal. (20165). Son of Samuel 
Ingersoll and Abigail Melissa (Griffin) Marston; grandson of Jonathan Sewcll 
and Cynthia Root (Ingersoll) Marston ; great-grandson of Samuel Marston, 
private, Capt. James Wedgcwood's Company, Col. Henry Dearborn's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

SAMUEL INGERSOLL MARSTON, Alameda, Cal. (20164). Son of Samuel I. 
and Abigail M. (Griffin) Marston; grandson of Jothani S. and Cynthia Root 
(Ingersoll) Marston; great-grandson of Samuel Marston, private, Capt. James 
W T edgcwood's Company, Col. Henry Dearborn's New Hampshire Regt. 

NOBLE FREDERICK MARTIN, Utica, N. Y. (Cal. 19445). Son of Jirah and 
Angeline (Sanders) Martin; grandson of Daniel and Delany (Pierce) Sanders; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Sanders, Jr., private Greene's Mass. Regt.; great- 
grandson of Benjamin Sanders, Sr., private Sparhawk's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE FRANCTS MIFFS, Fullcrton, Cal. (20155). Son of George Francis and 
Lillian J. (Andrews) Miles; grandson of Edwin Hunt and Sarah J. (Hawlcy) 
Andrews; great-grandson of Cliauncey and Electa (Hunt) Andrews; great- 
grandson of JJaz'id Andrczvs, private, Glastonbury, Conn., Company, Lexington 
Alarm. 

GEORGE ALFRED MONTELL, Santa Cruz, Cal. (20167). Son of Edgar TI. and 
Maria (Waters) Montcll; grandson of Elijah Dewey and Eliza Ann (Hinsdale) 



REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS 213 

Waters; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Mary (Dewey) Waters; great-grand- 
son of Eldad and Mary (Tilden) Dewey; greats-grandson of Jcdcdiah Dewey, 
Clergyman, volunteer soldier, "Fighting Parson Dewey." 
PATRICK NOBLE, San Francisco, Gat. (19441)- Son of Edward and Mary 
(Brattin) Noble; grandson of Patrick and Elizabeth B. (Pickens) Noble;' great- 
grandson of Ezekiel and Elizabeth (Bonneau) Pickens; great-grandson of 
Andrew Pickens, Brigadier-General South Carolina State troops. 

SHIRLEY BELL RYAN, San Francisco, Cal. (20156). Son .of Emmon Black- 
burn and Mary Louisa (Sweringen) Ryan; grandson of George Washington and 
Harriet (Jeter) Ryan; great-grandson of Littleton Jeter, private Virginia 
Militia, pensioned. 

SIDNEY VANUXEM SMITH, Berkeley, Cal. (19436). Son of Sidney Yanuxcm 
and Felixine (Tesseire) Smith; grandson of Nathan and Louisa Vanuxem 
(Clark) Smith; great-grandson of Elijah Clark, Lieutenant-Colonel Gloucester 
County New Jersey Militia; Member New Jersey Provincial Congress and Com- 
mittee of Safety. 

HOWARD GRIFFITH STEVENSON, San Francisco, Cal. (19442). Son of 
Charles Crawford and Ruth Anna (Griffith) Stevenson; grandson of Howard 
and Ruth (Plummcr) Griffith, Jr.; great-grandson of Howard and Jemima 
(Jacob) Griffith; great 2 -grandson of Greenberry Griffith, Member Committee of 
Observation of Frederick County, Maryland. 

PERCY KIRKWOOD SWAN, San Francisco, Cal. (20166). Son of William E. 
and Fannie (Wilson) Swan ; grandson of William A. and Louisa A. Swan; 
great-grandson of Robert Swan, Captain New Hampshire troops. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON TOWLE, San Francisco, Cal. (19440). Son of Ira and 
Annis (Doe) Towle; grandson of Brackett Toivle, Lieutenant New Hampshire 
troops. 

PETER VAN VALES, Hanford, Cal. ( 19446). Son of Cornelius and Matilda 
(Bush) Van Vales; grandson of Andrew and Hester (Little) Van Vales; great- 
grandson of Timothy (and Hannah Galloway) Little, private Orange County 
New York Militia; great--grandson of James Gallozvay, Lieutenant Orange 
County New York Militia. 

THOMAS EDWARD WALES, San Francisco, Cal. (19438). Son of Eugene 
Lawrence and Margaret Elizabeth (Mulcay) Wales; grandson of Theron and 
Charlotte B. (Derby) Wales; great-grandson of William and Rachael (Lovell) 
Wales; great-grandson of William Wales, private Mass. troops; great-grandson 
of Martin and Alary (Burrell) Derby; great 2 -grandson of Abner and Mary 
(White) Derby; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Derby, First Lieutenant Second 
Suffolk County Mass. Regt. ; greal"-graridson of Caleb Lovell, Captain and 
Quartermaster at Castle and Governors Islands; givat--grandson of Robert and 
Salome (Reed) Burrell; great 3 -grandson of David Bnrrcll, private Mass. troops. 

WILLIAM LOVELL WALES, San Francisco, Cal. (19439). Son of Eugene 
Lawrence and Margaret Elizabeth (Mulcay) Wales; grandson of Theron and 
Charlotte B. (Derby) Wales; great-grandson of William and Rachael (Lovell) 
Wales; great 2 -grandson of William IV ales, private Mass. troops; great-grandson 
of Martin and Mary (Burrell) Derby; grcat 2 -grandson of Abner and Mary 
(While) Derby; greats-grandson of Jonathan Derby, First Lieutenant Second 
Suffolk County Ma^. Regt.; grcat 2 -grandson of Caleb Lovell, Captain and 
Quartermaster at Castle and Governors Islands; great 2 -grandson of Robert and 
Salome (Reed) Burrell; great 3 -grandson of David Burrell, private Mass. troops. 

AUSTIN NELSON WALTON, San Francisco, Cal. 09437)- Son of Nelson Col- 
lins and Cora Ann (Bishop) Walton; grandson of Nelson Collins and Eliza Ann 
(Young) Walton; great-grandson of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Groome) Young; 
great 2 -grandson of John and Roxie (Banker) Young, Jr.; qrcat'-grandson of 
John Young, Surgeon New York Militia. 

HARVEY RISLEY WARREN, Los Angeles, Cal. (20150). Son of George .Austin 
and Almira (Risley) Warren; grandson of Nathaniel and Sara (Bidwcll) War- 
ren; great-grandson of .-Islibcl Warren, private Second Conn. Line. 






214 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

CASIMIR JACKSON WOOD, San Francisco, Cal. (20162). Son of William E. 
and Abbie F. (Jackson) Wood; grandson of Jacob Green and Flvenia D.Jack- 
son; great-grandson of Elijah and Betsey Jackson; great 2 -grandson of Samuel 
Jackson, private, Col. Joshua Wingate's New Hampshire Regt. 

COLORADO SOCIETY. 

CHARLES GALE ADAMS, Greeley, Colo. (201 oS). Son of George Samuel and 
Susan (Gale) Adams; grandson of Charles Augustus and Jennet t D. (Bemis) 
Gale; great-grandson of Samuel and Cynthia (Clark) Bemis; grcat--grandson of 
Moody and Susan (Richards) Clark; great a -grandson of Joseph Clark, Lieutenant 
New Hampshire Militia, pensioned; great-grandson of Otis and Elmira (Sher- 
win) Gale; great 2 -grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Cutler) Gale; great-grand- 
son of Isaac Gale, Jr., Sergeant, Col. Samuel Brewer's Mass. Regt. 
HIRAM SELDEN ASHLEY, Colorado Springs, Colo. (19859). Son of Hiram and 
Polly (Gilbert) Ashley; grandson of Noah and Elizabeth (Sheldon) Ashley; 
great-grandson of William Ashley, Lieutenant Berkshire County Mass. Militia. 
WILLIAM MAURICE ATKINS, Greeley, Colo. (20109). Son of Joseph and 
Laura J. (Pierce) Atkins; grandson of Flisha and Sarah (Ricker) Pierce; great- 
grandson of Ontario and Jane (Towne) Pierce; great--grandson of Hezckiah 
Pierce, Corporal, Colonel Simonds's Mass. Regt. 
JOHN ALDFN BAILEY, Denver, Colo. (20486). Son of Otis and Lucinda Alden 
(Lorfng) Bailey; grandson of James and Lncy (Brown) Bailey; great-grandson 
of Samuel Bailey, private, Col. Ebcnezer Bridge's Mass. Regt. 
BUFORD A. BANTA, Colorado Springs, Colo. (20476). Son of William I. and 
Margaret C. (Goff) Banta; grandson of Abraham and Elizabeth (Thorp) Banta; 
great-grandson of Henry and Wilmuth (Coombs) Banta; great-grandson of 
Abraham Banta, private, Capt, Hugh Campbell's Company, Col. Robert McPher- 
son's Second York County Battalion Penna. troops. 
WINSLOW BROOKS BOARDMAN, Colorado Springs, Colo. (19856). Son of 
Sewall and Elizabeth Wade (Brooks) Boardman ; grandson of William and 
Elizabeth (Hitchins) Boardman; great-grandson of Samuel Boardman, private 
Gerrish's Mass. Regt.; grandson of James W. and Rebecca (Wade) Brooks; 
great-grandson of Zachcriah Brooks, First Lieutenant Mass. Militia; great- 
grandson of Daniel Hitchins, private, minute man Mass. Militia. 
OLIVER EDWIN COLLINS, Colorado Springs, Colo. (19852). Son of Andrew 
Perry and Sarah Elizabeth (Blair) Collins; grandson of Oliver and Sarah (Noel) 
Collins; great-grandson of John and Lucy (Burdick) Collins; great--grandson of 
Thompson Burdick, private First Regt. Rhode Island Line, pensioned. 
HARRY WILBERT COOPER, Greeley, Colo. (20116). Son of Robert Hamilton 
and Anna Mary (Savage) Cooper; grandson of William and Margaret Ann 
(Leeper) Savage; great-grandson of Robert and Agnes (Harper) Leeper; great-- 
grandson of James Bciper, private Penna. Frontier Rangers. 
WILLIAM HENRY DELBRIDGE, Jr., Greeley, Colo. (201 10). Son of William H. 
and Mary Evelyn (Neilson) Delbridge; grandson of William Smith and Mary C. 
(Bowen) Neilson; great-grandson of Charles and Mahulda Allen (Easley) 
Bowen; great--grandson of Robert Bowen, private Third Virginia Regt. 
CHESTER N. DE VINE, Greeley, Colo. (19874). Son of Charles W. and Elsie 
(Forbes) De Vine; grandson of Andrew J. and Lydia (Pyle) Forbes; great- 
grandson of John and Sabina (Hamilton) Forbes; great 2 - grands on of John 
Forbes, Orderly Sergeant New York Militia, pensioned. 
WILLIAM THOMAS EUBANK, Denver, Colo. (19875). Son of Archillcs Eu- 
bank, private and wagoner Virginia Militia. 
GEORGE HAMILTON SWING, Greeley, Colo. (1087-). Son of Russell Merrick 
and Lucretia (King) Ewing; grandson of Asa Hamilton and Persis (Nichols) 
Ewing; great-grandson of Jabez and Sarah (Brown) Nichols, Jr.; great-grand- 
son of Jabez Nichols, private Mass. Continental troops; great-grandson of 
Jonathan Brown, Lieutenant, Leonard's Mass. Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 215 

WALTER HOMAN FICKLIN, Littleton, Colo. (19S53). Son of Joseph and 
Penelope (Terrill) Ficklin; grandson of James and Susan Mosely (Cave) 
Terrill; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Cornelius) Terrill; great-grand- 
son of Edmund Terrill, Sergeant Second Virginia Brigade; grandson of 
Joseph and Eleanor Wilson (Brown) Ficklin; great-grandson of Jared and 
Elizabeth (Dunklin) Ficklin; great 2 -grandson of John Ficklin, private Second 
Virginia Regt. 

EDWARD BELL FIELD, Jr., Denver, Colo. (20124). Son of Edward Bell and 
Mary Alice (Legg) Field; grandson of William Allen and Martha Ann (Tarr) 
Lcgg; great-grandson of Benjamin and Martha (Dyer) Tarr; grcat~-grandson of 
Elkanah Dyer, private, Capt. Joshua Jordan's Company, Col. Mitchell's Mass. 
Rcgt. 

JESSE R. FORBES, New Windsor, Colo. (20107). Son of Andrew J. and Lydia 
(Pyle) Forbes; grandson of John and Sabina (Hamilton) Forbes; great-grand- 
son of John Forbes, Orderly Sergeant New York Militia, pensioned. 

EDWARD P. HOLTENHOUSE, Payette, Idaho (Colo. 20488). Son of John and 
Sarah (Shaw) Holtenhouse; grandson of Moses and Maria (Loomis) Shaw; 
great-grandson of Israel and Mary Lee (Loomis) Shaw; great 2 -grand-,on of 
Israel Loomis, private Eighth Conn. Regt. 

GEORGE EVERETT HORNE, Greeley, Colo. (20104). Son of George D. and 
Lydia Francis (Stackpolc) Home; grandson of Joshua and Mary (Willay) 
Stackpole; great-grandson of Josiah and Abagail (Tcbbitts) Willey; great-- 
grandson of Josiah Wiley, private First Regt. Strafford County N. II. Militia. 

FLOYD DRAPER IIYLTON, Fort Collins, Colo. (20493). Son of T. W. and 
Mattie (Moore) Hylton; grandson of Joseph II. and Mary Baker (Johnston) 
Moore; great-grandson of John Wells and Nancy (Berry) Johnston; great 2 - 
grandson of James Johnston, private Fourteenth Virginia Regt. and Com- 
mander-in-Chief's Guard. 

JOHN T. JACOBS, Greeley, Colo. (20105). Son of Theodore Dwight and Lydia 
Jacobs; grandson of Ebenezcr and Laura (Yerenton) Jacobs; great-grandson 
of Nathaniel Jacobs, private Rhode Island Militia, pensioned. 

CHARLES CLIFFORD JONES, Denver, Colo. (20484). Son of Seth Lincoln 
and Louisa Jane (Chandler) Jones; grandson of Seth and Caroline (Josselyn) 
Jones; great-grandson of Charles and Deborah (Samson) Jones; great-grand- 
son of Simeon Jones, Sergeant Plymouth County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES EDWIN KEEPERS, Denver, Colo. (20405). Son of William Vane 
and Sarah (Pritchard) Keepers; grandson of William and Elizabeth (King) 
Keepers; great-grandson of William Keepers, private Fifth Cumberland County 
Battalion Penna. Militia. 

JIRAH HOLLIS KELLOGG, Lamar, Colo. (20106). Son of Jonathan Moore and 
Elizabeth Kellogg; grandson of Jirah Mumford and Eliza (Headon) Kellogg; 
great-grandson of Eliphalct Kellogg, Ensign, Colonel Wright's New York 
Regt. 

VICTOR E. KEYES, Greeley, Colo. (20101). Son of Melville and Elizabeth 
(Bassctt) Keycs; grandson of Wilson T. and Mary A. (Ostrander) Bassett; 
great-grand -urn of William and Harriett (Gregory) Ostrander; greats-grandson 
of Adam Ostrander, private, Colonel Van Rensselaer's New York Rcgt. 

WILLSON WHIPPLE KIRBY, Denver, Colo. (20490). Son of George and Kate 
Moore (Whipple) Kirby; grandson of Thomas and Sarah Hickman (Tomlinson) 
Kirby; great-grandson of Zebulon and Louisa (Gipson or Gibson) Kirby; 
great--grandson of John Gipson (Gibson), private Ninth Conn. Line, Col. Sam- 
uel B. Webb. 

WILSON SUMNER KNOWLES, Greeley, Colo. (201 1 1). Son of Myron 13. and 
Asinath (Butler) Knowlcs; grandson of Elisha ami Olive (Saunders) Knowles; 
great-grandson of Simon Knowlcs, private New Hampshire Line, pensioned. 

MALCOLM LINDSEY, Colorado Springs, Colo. (19855). Son of John A. and 
Emily H. (Jones) Lindsey; grandson of William II. and Emily II. (Snyder) 



2l6 SONS OF. THE AMERICAN REYOLUTIO: 









Tones; great-grandson of Peter and Sarah (Heston) Jones; grcat--grandson of 
William and (Miller) Jones; great 3 -grandson of Peter Jones, First Lieu- 
tenant Eleventh Rcgt. Pennsylvania Continental Line. 

CHAREES EDGAR LITTFLL, Greeley, Colo. (19871). Son of George Wash- 
ington and Anna (.Carls) Littcll; grandson of Isaac and Emeline (Slawson) 
Littell; great-grandson of Jonas Frazcc and Susan (Halsey) Eittell; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac Little, Littcll, private Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

REA PROCTOR McGEE, Denver, Colo. (-0120). Son of Ben Abe and Alice 
Florence (Norman) McGee; grandson of Joseph and Susan (McKnight) Nor- 
man; great-grandson of Decator and Margaret (Stuart) Norman; greats-grand- 
son of William Stuart; grcat 3 -grandson of William Stuart, Lieutenant Penna. 
Artillery. 

WIEEIAM RUFUS MARSFIAEE, Denver, Colo. (20119). Son of David Whit- 
law and Sarah Joe (Minter) Marshall; grandson of Jeremiah A. and Sarah 
(McDowell) Minter; great-grandson of Samuel and Annie (Irvine) McDowell; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel McDozvcll, Member of Virginia Convention 1775- 
1776, House of Delegates 1776, Colonel Augusta County Virginia Militia at 
Guilford Court House. 

SAMUEE FRANCIS MARTIN, Greeley, Colo. (201 13). Son of Samuel A. and 
Tabitha C. (Hopkins) Martin; grandson of Samuel and Nancy (Stark) Martin; 
great-grandson of Joseph Martin, Captain Cumberland County Penna. Militia. 

ALBERT C. MATHIAS, Monte Vista, Colo. (201 12). Son of David and Eve A. 
(Miller) Mathias; grandson of Frederick and Mary (Geyer) Miller; great- 
grandson of Joint Gcycr, drummer Penna. troops, pensioned. 

FRANKLIN ASA NIMS, Greeley, Colo. (20115). Son of Asa and Elvira (Moul- 
ter) Nims; grandson of Asaph and Marietta (Nichols) Nims; great-grandson of 
Ariel Nims, Sergeant Eighth Regt. Mass. Militia. 

DANA OLIVER NORTON, Ft. Collins, Colo. (20,196). Son of John Burgess and 
Katherine Manning (Murphy) Norton; grandson of Hiram Beach and Harriett 
(Burgess) Norton; great-grandson of John and Deborah (Terry) Burgess; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Burgess, Second Lieutenant Conn. Militia; great- 
grandson of Oliver Norton, private New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

IRVING HENRY PAINE, Greeley, Colo. (19870). Son of Noah and Lydia Ann 
(Whcatly) Paine; grandson of Noah Paine, private, Colonel Bedel's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

WAYNE BURNS PATTERSON, Greeley, Colo. (19873). Son of Martin V. B. 
and Jennie (Burns) Patterson; grandson of James and Juliet (Smith) Burns; 
great-grandson of Robert and Sarah (Turner) Burns; great L '-grandson of Dan- 
iel Turner, private First Regt. Penna. Line. 

WILLIAM ANDERSON PHILIPS, Greeley, Colo. (10869). Son of Samuel Gal- 
braith and Tabitha Harriet (Wilson) Philips; grandson of Enoch Wright and 
Jane (Galbraith) Philips; groat-grandson of Enoch and Catherine (Anderson) 
Philips; great 2 -grandson of David Fltilips, Captain Seventh Battalion Chester 
County Penna. Mditia. 

WENDELL BURR PRICE, Colorado Springs, Colo. (19857). Son of Basil Wells 
and Eliza (Burr) Price; grandson of James and Mary (Holmes) Price; great- 
grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (McNabb) Holmes; grcat 2 -grandson of Oba- 
diah and Mary (Clunn) Holmes; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Holmes, Member 
New Jersey Provincial Congress and Monmouth County Committee of Safety. 

SAMUEL LEWIS RUMSEY, Colorado Springs, Colo. (19858). Son of Phineas 
and Charlotte Youngs (Lewis) Rumsey; grandson of Samuel J. and Mary 
(Youngs) Lewis; great-grandson of Ichabod Lewis, private Third Rcgt. Orange 
County New York Militia. 

WARREN II. RUSSELL, Fort Collins, Colo. (20492). Son of Howard and Jen- 
nie (Warren) Russell; grandson of Dwigbt and Angelina (Grant) Warren; 



REGISTER OF NKW MEMBERS 21 7 

great-grandson of Phineas and Mary A. F. (Dean) Warren; great-grandson 
of Phineas and Mary (Knight) Warren; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Warren, 

Captain Vermont Militia. 

WALTER FARNAN SCHUYLER, Denver, Colo. (20125). Son of Frederick arid 
Nellie M. (Farnan) Schuyler; grandson of Philip Church and Lucy M. (Dix) 
Schuyler; great-grandson of John II. and Annatie (Fort) Schuyler; great- 
grandson of Harmanus Schuyler, Assistant Deputy Commissary General of the 
Northern Department, Revolutionary Army. 

CHARLES NOYFS SHANNON, Denver, Colo. (20489). Son of George F. and 
Henrietta (Noycs) Shannon; grandson of Benjamin F. and Eunice (Miner) 
Noyes; great-grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Babcock) Noycs; great 2 - 
grandson of Joscpli Noycs, Colonel First Kings County Regiment Rhode 
Island Militia. 

JOHN T. SPFFR, Denver, Colo. O0862). Son of Thomas and Ann Adalia 
(Taylor) Speer; grandson of Matthias and Hannah Taylor; great-grandson of 
David Taylor, private New Jersey Militia. 

ORIGFN SEYMOUR STORRS, Denver, Colo. (20498). Son of Lucius and 
Susan Y. Storrs; grandson of Dan Starrs, private Conn. Militia, Lexington 
Alarm list. 

HARRY POWERS STORY, Denver, Colo. (20485). Son of Charles W. and 
Anna Belle (Powers) Story; grandson of Henry Comegys and Abbie Win- 
gate (Uussey) Powers; great-grandson of Daniel and Abigail (Blake) Ilussey; 
great 2 -grandson of William and Elizabeth (Wingate) Blake; great 3 -grandson of 
JosJiua WingatCj Colonel Second New Hampshire Regt., Col. Joshua Wingate. 

GEORGE ALVIN STOUGH, Denver, Colo. (20 n 7). Son of Omar V. and Mary 
Jane (Dawson) Stough; grandson of Jacob and Margaret (Eatinger) Stough; 
great-grandson of Jacob Stough, private Second Battalion Lancaster County, 
Penna., Militia; grandson of James M. and Mardie (Bozarth) Dawson; great- 
grandson of Lemuel and Mary Jane (Garrison) Dawson; great 2 -grandson of 
Jolin Dazvson, private Virginia troops-, pensioned. 

FRANCIS L. STRANG, Black Hawk, Colo. (19861). Son of Stephen Brown and 
Louisa (Luqueer) Strang; grandson of Samuel Bartow and Catherine (White) 
Strang; great-grandson of Ebcnczer IV hit c, Surgeon Third Regt. Westchester 
County New York Militia. 

S. BARTOW STRANG, Denver, Colo. (19860). Son of Stephen Brown and 
Louisa (Luqueer) Strang; grandson of Samuel and Catherine (White) Strang; 
great-grandson of Ebenezer White, Surgeon Third Regt. Westchester County 
New York Militia. 

CHARLES ARTHUR TARBEL, Denver, Colo. (20114). Son of Paul and Louise 
Ellen (Harr) Tarbcl; grandson of Charles W. and Lucretia Ellen (Harris) 
Harr; great-grandson of Tames and Anne C. (Chambers) Harris; great'-'- 
graudson of Janus and Rebecca (Gill) Chambers; great :i -grandson of Thomas 
Gill (Giles), Captain South Carolina Dragoons. 

LATTIROP M. TAYLOR, Fort Collins, Colo. (20409). Son of William L. and 
Florence (Montgomery) Taylor; grandson of Alexander Kenny and Angeline 
(Reisinger) Montgomery; great-grandson of Simpson Walker and Nancy 
(Caldwell) Montgomery; greats-grandson of John Montgomery, private Fcnna. 
troops, pensioned. 

WILLIAM EMTL TARBEL, Kremmling, Colo. (201,8). Son of Paul and Lou-se 
Ellen (Harr) Tarbcl; grandson of Charles W. and Lucretia Ellen (Harris) 
Harr; great-grandson of James and Anne C. (Chambers) Harris; great-- 
grandson of James and Rebecca (Gill) Chambers; grcat 3 -grandson of Thomas 
Gill (Giles), Captain South Carolina Dragoons. 

GEORGE WYLLYS WARNER, Fort Morgan, Colo. (20,07). Son of Chauncey 
and Ellen (Tuttle) Warner; grandson of Isaac and Cine Ann (Gridley) Tut- 
tie; great-grandson of Jesse and Eleanor (Warner) Tuttle; great 2 -grandson of 
Jabcs Tuttle, private Tenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 



2l8 Su.\S OF Till; AMERICAN INVOLUTION 

COURTF.NAY CLEVELAND WASHINGTON, Greeley, Colo. (20483). Son of 

Courtenay and Jessie Hale (Cleveland) Washington; grandson of Jesse Alex- 
ander Harrison and Eliza Jane (Cash) Cleveland; great-grandson of Jessie 
and Lucy (Graves) Cleveland; great--grandson of Alexander Cleveland, pri- 
vate Virginia Militia. 

CHARLES AUGUSTINE WHITE,, Greeley, Colo. (20102). Son of James and 
Abigail Butler (Coburn) White; grandson of James and Susan (Flint) White; 
great-grandson of John White, private Mass. Militia at Lexington Alarm; 
great-grandson of Miles Flint, Lieutenant, Spaulding's and Reed's Mass. Regts. 

DORMAN EATON WHITE, Greeley, Colo. (20103). Son of Charles Augustine 
and Caroline Pamelia (Foster) White; grandson of James and Abigail Butler 
(Coburn) White, Jr.; great-grandson of James and Susan (Flint) White; 
great-grandson of John White, private Mass. Militia at Lexington Alarm; 
great a -grandson of Miles Flint, Lieutenant, Spaulding's and Reed's Mass. 
Regts. 

VVARDNER WILLIAMS, Denver, Colo. (204S7). Son of Thomas R. and Sarah 
Williams; grandson of Thomas and Catherine (Deavendorf) Williams; great- 
grandson of Thomas and Margaret (Sweet) Williams; great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel Williams, Captain New York Militia. 

FRANK GRIMES WILLIS, Cripple Creek, Colo. (19854). Son of Willet Rannc-y 
and Frances M. (Grimes) Willis; grandson of James Stanley and Frances 
(Warner) Grimes; great-grandson of John and Fanny (Sanderson) Warner; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Amasiah Sanderson, private Mass. troops, pensioned. 

CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

SEYMOUR LANDON ALVORD, Winsted, Conn. (19909). Son of James R. and 
Mary Eliza (Landon) Alvord; grandson of James Hall and Lucy (Cook) 
Alvord; great-grandson of Reuel Alvord, private Second Regt. Conn. Line; 
great-grandson of Richard Cook, private First and Third Regts. Conn. Line, 
pensioned. 

FRANK LEE ARMSTRONG, Bridgeport, Conn. (20320). Son of Charles Henry 
and Laura (Lee) Armstrong; grandson of Gurdon Bartram and Caroline 
Eulina (Gorham) Lee; great-grandson of Milo and Lucy Ann (Bartram) Lee; 
great 2 -grandson of Daniel Lee, private Twelfth Regt. Mass. Continental Line, 
afterwards First Regt., pensioned. 

DOW ROWLAND IIEKBE, Bridgeport, Conn. (20842). Son of William Ben- 
jamin and Mary Frances (Rowland) Beebc; grandson of John Rogers and 
Mary Ann (Lanfare or Lanphier) Rowland; great-grandson of Oliver and 
Lois (Willard) Lanphier; great 2 -grandson of Oliver Lanphier, Jr., private Sev- 
enth Conn. Regt. 

TIIADDEUS BROOKS BELCHER, Bridgeport, Conn. (20843). Son of Thad- 
detis and Maria (Brooks) Becchcr; grandson of Birdsey and Emily Brooks; 
great-grandson of Jo):n (and Mary Coe) Brooks, private, Captain Walker's 
Conn. Company, pensioned; great-'-grandson of Ebenczcr Coc, Captain Conn. 
Militia, wounded in Danbury raid, pensioned. 

CARL EMILE BEERS, New Haven, Conn. (19957). Son of Robert A. and Ida 
(Cooke) Beers; grandson of Anthony and Betsey (Ruggles) Beers; great-. 
grandson of (Robert) Boslwick Ruggles, Sergeant, Swift's Conn. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

FRANK LEWIS BIGELOW, New Haven, Conn. (19100). Son of Hobart B. and 
Eleanor (Lewis) Bigelow; grandson of Levi L. and Belinda (Pierpont) Bige- 
low; great-grandson of EHsha and Elizabeth (Cheney) Bigelow; great-grand- 
son of Paul Bi^elo:v, drummer and private Mass. Militia. 

CLINTON HARRISON BIRD, New Haven, Conn. (19096). Son of Theodore and 
FHza (Harrison) Bird; grandson of Joshua and Susan (Jackson) Bird; great- 
grandson of Samuel Jackson, Corporal Third Regt. Conn. Line. 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS 210, 

FRANK ERNEST BLAKEMAN, Oronoquc, Stratford, Conn. (20844). Son of 
Gould and Harriet (Birdscy) Blakeman; grandson of James Blakcman, private 
Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JAMES HENRY BLAKEMAN, Stratford, Conn. (20845). Son of James and 
Cornelia (Salmon) Blakcman; grandson of James Blakeman, private Conn. 
Militia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM CUTLER BOWERS, Bridgeport, Conn. (203-':). Son of Caleb Bailey 
and Fannie Maria (Cutler) Bowers; grandson of William and Almira (Bailey) 
Bowers; great-grandson of Caleb and Elizabeth (Tuclls) Bailey; great-grand- 
son of Caleb Bailey, private Second Conn. Continental Rcgt. 

EDWARD EEIAS BRADLEY, New Haven, Conn. (19958). Son of Isaac and 
Abigail Knowles (Hervey) Bradley; grandson of Eewis and Eydia (Woodin) 
Bradley; great-grandson of Isaac Bradley, private Conn. Militia. 

BENJAMIN HIEE BRISTOL, Naugatuck, Conn. (20308). Son of Iliel and Anna 
Chastina (Potter) Bristol; grandson of Nehemiah and Eorania (Dowries) Bris- 
tol; great-grandson of John Doiuncs, Orderly Sergeant, Quartermaster Ferris's 
Conn. Regt. 

BENNE'F BERI BRISTOL, Naugatuck, Conn. (20307). Son of Benjamin Iliel 
and Pauline Spalding (Phelps) Bristol; grandson of Iliel and Anna Chastina 
(Potter) Bristol; great-grandson of Nehemiah ami Eorania (Dowries) Bristol; 
great J -grandson of John Dozvnes, Orderly Sergeant, Quartermaster Ferris's 
Conn. Regt. 

EDGAR HIEE BRISTOL, Naugatuck, Conn. (20309). Son of Benjamin ITiel and 
Pauline Spalding (Phelps) Bristol; grandson of Iliel and Anna Chastina 
(Potter) Bristol; great-grandson of Nehemiah and Eorania (Downcs) Bristol; 
grcat 2 -grandson of John Dounes, Orderly Sergeant, Quartermaster Ferris's 
Conn. Regt. 

ORLANDO HALL BROTHWELL, Bridgeport, Conn. (19973). Son of Benjamin 
Beach and Elizabeth (Cookingham) Brothwell; grandson of Roswell and Julia 
Ann (Hall) Brothwell; great-grandson of Benjamin Brothwell, Corporal, 
Colonel Canheld's Conn. Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

WILBUR FISKE BURNS, Bridgeport, Conn. 09959)- Son of Calvin White and 
Elvira (Noyes) Burns; grandson of David and Susannah (Knight,) Burns; 
great-grandson of John Burns, private New Hampshire Militia, pensioned, 

FRANCIS JOSEPH CHATTERTON, New Haven, Conn. (1997"). Son of Francis 
and Mary Josephine (Riker) Chatterton; grandson of John and Elizabeth 
(Lines) Chatterton; great-grandson of Major I^ines, Lieutenant Second Com- 
pany Governor's Foot Guards of Connecticut. 

ARTHUR LUCIUS CLARK, Winsted, Conn. (19951). Son of Cyrus E. and 
Harriet (Oviatt) Clark; grandson of Ebenezer and Sally (Sanford) Clark; 
great-grandson of Strong Sanford, Sergeant Conn, troops, pensioned; grandson 
of John A. and Caroline (Mason) Oviatt; great-grandson of Hlisha Mason, 
artiticcr Conn. Continental troops, pensioned. 

DAVID COE, Stratford, Conn. (20322). Son of Dennis and Phoebe Ann (Wilcox) 
Coe; grandson of James and Sarah (Thompson) Coe; great-grandson of James 
Coe, private Fourth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

JAMES NELSON COE, Noroton Heights, Conn. (19961). Son of Nelson Daniel 
and Maria II. (Seymour) Coe; grandson of Daniel and Anna (Sweet) Coe; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Coe, Sergeant Conn. Militia. 

LEVI MORELLE COOKE, Wallingford, Conn. (20313). Son of George W. and 
Elizabeth A. (Doolittle) Cooke; grandson of Levi and Eunetia (Hemingway) 
Doolittle; great-grandson of Levi and Esther (Tuttle) Doolittle; great-grandson 
of Ezra Doolittle, Sergeant, Colonel Hooker's Regt. Conn. Militia; great- 
grandson of Lucius Tattle, Lieutenant Conn, troops. 
BLISS STEBBINS COWLES, Hartford, Conn. (19095). Son of Frank and 
Emeline N. Cowles; grandson of Stephen and Thankful (Uatheway) Cowles; 



220 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

great-grandson of Elijah and Thankful (King) Ilathcway; great 2 -grandson of 

Daniel King, private Conn. State troops. 

RICHARD GRISWOLD DAVIS, New Haven, Conn. (20846). Son of Daniel 
Loper and Lucy N. (Griswold) Davis; grandson of Joel and Polly (Bartlett) 
Griswokl; great-grandson of Joel and Lucy (Lee) Griswold; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel Lee, Captain First Company Twenty-eighth Conn. Regt. 

ELI PHELPS ELLSWORTH, Bridgeport, Conn. (20847). Son of J. Phelps and 
Ruth (Phelps, Case) Ellsworth; grandson of Eli Phelps, Corporal, Colonel 
Wolcott's Conn. Regt. 

GEORGE READING FARLEE, New York, N. Y. (Conn. -0323). Son of John 
Reading and Hannah Maria (Scudder) Farlee; grandson of Isaac and Abigal 
(Witherell) Scudder; great-grandson of William Scudder, Lieutenant Colonel 
Third Middlesex County Regt., New Jersey Militia. 

LEWIS EDSON FROST, Mcriden, Conn. (20324). Son of Lewis Hall and Adaline 
(Lewis) Frost; grandson of David and Mary Ann (Hitchcock) Frost; great- 
grandson of David Hitchcock, First Lieutenant, Colonel McLellan's Conn. Regt. 

JOSEPH MERRICK GALLOND, Watcrbury, Conn. (19968). Son of George 15. 
and Adaline (Blanchard) Callond; grandson of Jeremiah and. Dorcas (Babbitt) 
Gallond; great-grandson of Jeremiah Gallond, Corporal, Colonel Cushing's 
Mass. Regt. 

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL GOODRICH, Portland, Conn. (19974). Son of Eli/.ur 
and Caroline (Shepard) Goodrich; grandson of Daniel and Mary. (Pelton) 
Shepard; great-grandson of Daniel Shepard, Orderly Sergeant, Colonel Pen- 
field's Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

JOHN FREDERIC GORHAM, Westport, Conn. (-0848). Son of John W. and 
Caroline M. (Hendrickson) Gorham; grandson of Abraham and Junice M. 
(Treadwell) Hendrickson; great-grandson of Stephen and Sally (Richardson) 
Treadwell; grcat--grandson of Daniel Trcadtvcll, private, Col. Philip Burr 
Bradley's Conn. Battalion, pensioned. 

HENRY ROBERT GREENE, Bridgeport, Conn. (20S49). Son of Darwin W. 
and Adelaide (Mathewson) Greene; grandson of Edwin W. and Harriet (Wal- 
den) Mathewson; great-grandson of Luther and Harriet (Place) Mathewson; 
grcat 2 -grandson of John Place, ■ private, ■ Col. Jeremiah Olney's Rhode Island 
Regt., pensioned. 

FREDERICK WILLEY HALF, Bridgeport, Conn. (20310). Son of Ormel A. and 
Rebecca Nichols (Hatch) Hall; grandson of Daniel and Ann (Nichols) Hatch; 
great-grandson of Lemuel Nichols, Sergeant, Lieut. -Colonel Baldwin's Conn. 
Regt. 

ORMEL HOWARD HALL, Bridgeport, Conn. (19971). Son of Ormel A. and 
Rebecca Nichols (Hatch) Hall; grandson of Daniel and Ann (Nichols) Hatch; 
great-grandson of Lemuel Nichols, Sergeant, Lieut. -Colonel Baldwin's Conn. 
Regt. 

WILLIAM EDWARD HALLIGAN, Bridgeport, Conn. (20S50). Son of John 
and Sarah Ann (Palmer) Halligan; grandson of Warren and Sally (Merritt) 
Palmer; great-grandson of Smith Palmer, private, Colonel Elmore's Conn. 
Regt., pensioned. 

WILLIAM HENRY HART, Stratford, Conn. (20314). Son of Henry W. and 
Mary Elizabeth (Black) Hart; grandson of William and Rhoda (Judd) Hart, 
Jr.; great-grandson of Stephen and Sally (White) Hart; great--grandson of 
Ezra White, private Third Conn. Continental Line. 

SIDNEY EDWIN HAWLEY, Bridgeport, Conn. (20325). Son of Charles and 
Anna (Merwin) TTawley; grandson of Daniel and Johanna (Sccley) Hawley; 
great-grandson of. Seth Seelcy, Ensign Conn. Militia. 

ALBERT CUSIIMAN HENDRICK, New Haven, Conn. (19097). Son of Joel 
Dennis and Maria Hendrick; grandson of Coc Ilendrich, seaman, brig "Lexing- 
ton," and private, Douglas's Conn. Regt., pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 221 

CARLETON KDBON IJOAD1/EY, New Haven, Conn. (20851). Son of Henry 
Tomlinson and Sarah Jennettc (Jucld) Hoadlcy; grandson of Amos Murray 
and Elizabeth Ann (Titus) Judd; great-grandson of Joseph and Polly (West) 
Titus, Jr.; grcat--grandson of Joseph Titus, private, Colonel Porter's and other 
Conn. Regis., pensioned. 

DWIGHT GERARD HOI, BROOK, Hartford, Conn. (1909S). Son of D.wight and 
Kalista (Thayer) Ilolbrook; grandson of Josiah and Lucy (Swift) Ilolbrook; 
great-grandson of Daniel Ilolbrook, Captain Conn. Militia; grandson of Joseph 
Thaxter and Orrel (White) Thayer; great-grandson of Elkanah and Hannah 
(Thaxter) Thayer; great-'-grandson of Josepli Thaxter, Chaplain, Robertson's 
Mass. Regt. 

JAMES HARRY ITOLBROOK, Winsted, Conn. (20852). Son of James B. and 
Minnie (Placethes) ITolbrook; grandson of James and Mary Baker (Tyler) 
Holbrook; great-grandson of Paschal P. and Betsey (Baker) Tyler; great 3 - 
grandson of Daniel (and Mehitable Putnam) Tyler, Captain Conn. Matross 
Company; great 3 -grandson of Israel Putnam, Major General of Continental 
Army. 

FRANK DE WITT HOTCITKISS, Fairfield, Conn. (20S53). Son of Burritt 
Mackenzie and Adeline M. (Hall) Ilotchkiss; grandson of Marvin and Eunice 
(Durand) Ilotchkiss; great-grandson of Avera and Philamela (Judd) Ilotch- 
kiss; great 2 -grandson of Amos and Abigail (Scott) Ilotchkiss ; grcat 3 -grandson 
of Gideon Ilotchkiss, Member Committee of Safety of Watcrbury, Conn. 

ELIJAH KENT HUBBARD, Jr., Middletown, Conn. (19952). Son of Elijah Kent 
and Anna Jones (Dyer) Hubbard; grandson of Elijah Kent and Elizabeth 
Sebor (de Kovcn) Hubbard; great-grandson of Elijah and Lydia (Mather) 
Hubbard; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Hubbard, Commissary and State Clothier 
Conn. Continental troops. 

ANDREW BURR HUNTINGTON, Southport, Conn. (20826). Son of Enoch 
Smith and Esther (Lyon) Huntington; grandson of Burr and Abigail (Burr) 
I, yon; great-grandson of Wakerman and Esther (Hubbell) Lyon; great-'-grand- 
son of John Hubbell, Lieutenant, Capt. Jonathan Dimon's Company Conn. 
Militia. 

JOHN M JACKMAN, Bridgeport, Conn. (10854). Son of Angier M. and Chris- 
tina (French) Jackman; grandson of Abel Jackman, private, Colonel Gerrish's 
Regt. Conn. Guards, and private, Colonel Turner's Regt. 

WILLIAM WALLACE JONES, Bridgeport, Conn. (20827). Son of William W. 
and Marietta (Skinner) Jones; grandson of Charles D. and Nancy (Wood- 
house) Skinner; great-grandson of Stephen Skinner, Corporal, Captain Wil- 
liams's Company, Colonel Johnson's Conn. Regt. 

CHARLES FREDERICK JUDSON, Stratford, Conn. (20855). Son of Curtis 
and Delia (Stowe) Judson; grandson of Ephraim and Mehitable (Thompson) 
Judson; great-grandson of David Thompson, Lieutenant Fifth Company Fourth 
Regt. Conn. Militia. 

PERCY DUNCAN LITTLEJOITN, New Haven, Conn. (20856). Son of Elliott 
and Sarali (Mallory) Littlcjohn; grandson of Albert B. and Grace EK'cta 
(Sherwood) Mallory; great-grandson of Rukard Burke and Eunice (Ilotch- 
kiss) Mallory; great 2 -granclson of Walker and Martha (Mesior) Mallory; 
grcat 8 -grandson of Aimer Mallory, Captain Thirteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

BUCKINGHAM LOCKWOOD, Norwalk, Conn. (20829). Son of William Buck- 
ingham Eliphalct and Alary C. (Maniee) Lockwood; grandson of Buckingham 
St. John and Polly Esther (St. John) Lockwood; great-grandson of EHphalet 
Lockwood, Captain Ninth Regt. Conn. Militia, Assistant Commissary of Issues. 

MAURICE DE FOREST LOCKWOOD, Norwalk, Conn. (20315). Son of William 
Buckingham EHphalet and Mary C. (Maniee) Lockwood; grandson of Bucking- 
ham St. John and Polly Esther (St. John) Lockwood; great-grandson of 
EHphalet Lockivood, Assistant Commissary of Issues, Captain Ninth Conn. 
Militia. 



223 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

MAURICE DE FOREST LOCKWOOD, Jr., Norwalk, Conn. (-0830). Son of 
Maurice De Forest and Annie C. (Eawrencc) Lockwood; grandson of William 
Buckingham Eliphalet and Mary C. (Manice) Eockwood; great-grandson ol 
Buckingham St. John and Polly Esther (St. John) Lockwood; great 2 -grandson 
of Eliphalet Lockwood, Captain Ninth Regt. Conn. Militia, Assistant Commia 
sary of Issues. 

CHARLES HENRY LOUNSBURY, Seymour, Conn. (19975). Son of Ransom 
and Mary (Joyce) Eounsbury; grandson of Josiah and Sally (Lines) Louns- 
bury; great-grandson of Linus Lounsbury, private Conn. Militia, pensioned; 
great-grandson of Erasius Lines, Ensign Tenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM HENRY LYON, Meriden, Conn. (20828). Son of George W. and 
Harriet Amelia (Snow) Lyon; grandson of David and Jemima Matilda (Doane) 
Snow; great-grandson of Joel Doane, private Conn. Line. 

BELA HARTLEY MANN, Ilamdcn, Conn. (10053)- Son of Bela Atwater and 
Prudence Cornelia (Spencer) Mann; grandson of Jonathan Porter and Eliza 
Ann (Bailey) Spencer; great-grandson of Felix ami Desire Spencer; great 2 - 
grandsun of Stephen Spencer, private Conn. Militia at Lexington Alarm. 

BUCKINGHAM MARSH, Bridgeport, Conn. (-0857). Son of James P. and 
Julia Ann (Sprague) Marsh; grandson of Jedediah and Athela (Gillette) 
Sprague; great-grandson of Philip Sprague, private, Col, Samuel Fletcher's 
Vermont Regt., pensioned. 

BUCKINGHAM PARSONS MERRIMAN, Waterbury, Conn. (20831). Son of 
William Buckingham and .Sarah Kingsbury (Parsons) Mcrriman; grandson of 
Charles Buckingham and Mary Margaret (Field) Mcrriman; great-grandson of 
William Henry and Sarah (Buckingham) Merrirnan; great'--grandson of 
Charles Mcrriman, Drum Major Sixth and Fourth Regts. Conn. Line. 

EDWARD JUCKETT MORGAN, Bridgeport, Conn. (20316). Son of Russell P. 
and Eleanor S. (Lewis) Morgan; grandson of Russell and Polly (Solley) 
Morgan; great-grandson of Thomas Solley, private, Col. Elisha Sheldon's 
Second Continental Dragoons, pensioned. 

CHARLES GOULD MORRIS, Newtown, Conn. (20301). Son of Luzon Burnt 
and Eugenia Laura (Tuttle) Morris; grandson of Eli Gould and Lydia (Ben- 
nett) Morris; great-grandson of Daniel Morris, Jr., private Fairfield, Conn., 
Company at Lexington Alarm. 

EDWARD SEYMOUR MOULTON, New Haven, Conn. (20832). Son of Tyler 
Calvin and Susan Abigail (Seymour) Moulton; grandson of Hart and Mercy 
(North) Seymour; great-grandson of Stephen and Susanna (Savage) North; 
great--grandson of Elisha Savage, Lieutenant, Captain Shepard's Company, 
Colonel Belden's Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of Jonathan (and Abigail Hart) 
Seymour, private, Capt. Asa Bray's Company, Col. Noadiah Hooker's Conn. 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Hart, private, Captain Stdodard's Company, 
Col. Noadiah Hooker's Conn. Regt. 

DAVID LEWIS NFTTLETON, Milford, Conn. (20311). Son of Lewis J. and 
Charlotte A. (Baldwin) Nettleton; grandson of Davis Lewis and Martha Pond 
(De Witt) Baldwin; great-grandson of Nathan Baldwin, Lieutenant in com- 
mand of Fort at Milford, Conn.; grandson of David and Mabel (Sanford) 
Nettleton; great-grandson of Elisha Sanford, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JOSEPH ARNOLD NORCROSS, New Haven, Conn. (20317). Son of Henry 
Fanning and Susan Brainard (Arnold) Norcross; grandson of Joseph and Mary 
Louisa (Phelps) Arnold; great-grandson of Noah A. and Delia (Clark) Phelps; 
great 2 -grandson of Noah Amherst anil Charlotte (Wilcox) Phelps; great-grand- 
son of Noafi Phelps, Colonel Conn. Militia; grandson of William Otis and 
Mary (Fanning) Norcross; great-grandson of Henry and Maria (Ketchum) 
Fanning; great-grandson of Charles Fanning, Lieutenant, Captain by brevet, 
First Conn. Continental Line. 

CHARLES SCRANTON PALMER, Meriden, Conn. (19963). Son of Ralph 
Averill and Sarah Arms (Kinney) Palmer; grandson of Henry and Irene 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 223 

(Avcrill) Palmer; great-grandson of Daniel and Abigal (Foot) Averill; great 2 - 
grandson of Daniel Averill, fifer and private Seventh Conn. Line. 

SALMON GRAHAM PEASE, New Haven, Conn. (20306). Son of Thomas Hunt- 
ington and Elizabeth (Graham) Pease; grandson of Salmon and Matilda-dlunt- 
ington) Pease; great-grandson of Calvin Pease, drummer, Captain Bostwick's 
Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of Thomas Huntington, Surgeon Conn. Company 
at Lexington Alarm; grandson of William Hackaliah Preston and Maria 
(Curtiss) Graham; great-grandson of Andrew Graham, Member of Committee 
of Safety, Woodbury, Conn., private Conn, troops. 

GEORGE HENRY PECK, Bridgeport, Conn. (20833). Son of Edwin and Caroline 
(Nichols) Peek; grandson of Prosper and Luey (Curtiss) Nichols: great-grand- 
son of Daniel Mitchell Curtiss, Sergeant Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES HENRY PEET, Bridgeport, Conn. (20834)- Son of Charles Henry 
and Harriet (Wooster) Peet; grandson of Samuel and Anne (Edwards) Woos- 
ter; great-grandson of Nathan Wooster, private, Colonel Whiting's Fourth 
Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of James Ross and Alice (Coe) Edwards; great 2 - 
grandson of Ebe>ie~er Cue, Sergeant, Captain Ilubbell's Company Conn. Militia. 

WILBERT WARREN PERRY, Hartford, Conn. (10064). Son of Wilbert Warren 
and Kate C. (Pratt) Perry; grandson of Franklin R. and Clarinda (Barbour) 
Perry; great-grandson of Henry and Naomi (Humphrey) Barbour; great-- 
grandson of Solomon and Hannah (Brown) Humphrey; great 3 -grandson of 
John Broivn, Captain Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

ANDREW WHEELER PHILLIPS, New Haven, Conn. (20302). Son of Israel 
Dennison and Wealthy Browning (Wheeler) Phillips; grandson of Daniel and 
Sally (Barker) Phillips; great-grandson of William Phillips, private, Colonel 
Yarnum's Rhode Island Regt., pensioned. 

WEBSTER CALDWELL RICH, Frankfort, N. Y. (Conn. 10954). Son of Charles 
Marvin and Blanche T. (Webster) Rich; grandson of John S. and Amanda M. 
(Caldwell) Rich; great-grandson of. George and Anna (Slate) Rich; great 2 - 
grandson of Peter and Louisa (Griswold) Rich; great n -grandson of White Gris- 
zvold, private Eighth Regt. Conn. Line. 

GEORGE SMITH ROWE, Winstcd, Conn. (19955). Son of John W. and Sarah 
Clarinda (Smith) Rowe; grandson of Moses and Anna Maria (Scribncr) Smith; 
great-grandson of Thadcus Seribner, private Twelfth Albany County New York 
Regt. 

HARRY CARLETON RUSSELL, Bristol, Conn. (20S58). Son of Joseph and 
Harriet Louise (Sutliffe) Russell; grandson of John Hopson and Harriet 
(Warner) Sutliffe; great-grandson of John and Chloe (Hopson) Sutliffe; 
great 2 -grandson of John Sutliffe, private Waterbury, Conn., Minute Men, and 
private, Colonel Hooker's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

BRADLEY MYRON SEARS, Mansfield, Conn. (19056). Son of Myron and 
Emeline (Seagrave) Sears; grandson of David and Roty (Bradley) Scars; great- 
grandson of David Sears, Sergeant Mass. Militia, and Sergeant of Marines on 
ship "Defence." 

HENRY JAMES SEELEY, Bridgeport, Conn. (20836). Son of Samuel Hamilton 
and Catherine Elizabeth (Nash) Seeley; grandson of Zcnas and Lorenda (Bart- 
lett) Nash; great-grandson of Caleb and Abbie (Stevens) Nash, Jr.; greal 2 - 
grandson of Caleb Nash, private, Col. David Cusliing's Mass. Regt. 

OIRRY MORTIMER SHEPARD, New Haven, Conn. (20837). Son of Henry 
Hudson and Augusta (Case) Shepard; grandson of Theron and Huldah (Hart) 
Shepard; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Kellogg) Shepard: great-grand- 
son of Thomas Shepard, Captain, Col. James Wadsworth's Conn. Regt. 

EARNEST CLYDE SIMPSON, New Haven, Conn. (19099). Son of George and 
Frances Yirginia (Shewalter) Simpson; grandson of Jacob and Arabella (Abby) 
Shewalter; great-grandson of Jonas and Barbara (Unlet) Abby; grcat 2 -grandson 
of Charles Unlet, Musician and Drum Major New Jersey Artillery, pensioned. 



224 sons ul ' TIIi '' American revolution 

EDWARD WEIR SMITH, Mcridcn, Conn. (20303). Son of David and Fidelia 
Augusta (Parker) Smith; grandson of David and Anna (Bartholomew) Smith; 

great-grandson of Jacob Smith, private, Colonel Hooker's Conn. Rcgt. 

FRANK DANIEL SMITH, Mcridcn, Conn. (20304). Son of David and Fidelia 
Augusta (Parker) Smith; grandson of David and Anna (Bartholomew) Smith; 
great-grandson of Jacob Smith, Sergeant, Colonel Hooker's Conn. Rcgt. 

JOSEPH HENRY STAGG, Bridgeport, Conn. (20838). Son of Henry Price and 
Mary E- (King) Stagg; grandson of Joseph IT. and Helen B. (Curtis) Stagg; 
great-grandson of Agur and Alice (Peck) Curtis, Jr.; great--grandson of Agur 
Curtis, private, Col. Samuel Whiting's and other Conn. Regts., pensioned. 

WILLIAM WRIGHT STARR, Bridgeport, Conn. (20839)- Son of William 
Wright and Susan (Hotchkiss) Starr; grandson of Cyrus and Catharine (Fow- 
ler) Hotchkiss; great-grandson of Elijah and Mehitable Hotchkiss; great-- 
grandson of Caleb Hotchkiss, private Conn. Militia, killed at New Haven in- 
vasion July s, 1779. 

CARLTON HICKOX STEVENS, Greenwich, Conn. (208.40). Son of Robert Mer- 
win and Emma Jennie (Ilickox) Stevens; grandson of Robert and Mary 
Elizabeth (Merwin) Stevens; great-grandson of Hcrschall and Clarissa (Bough- 
ton or Bouton) Stevens; grcat 2 -grandson of Elislia Stevens, Artificer in Col. 
Jeduthan Baldwin's Corps of Artificers. 

WILRIS MITCHELL TATE, Waterbury, Conn. (20305). Son of Frederick W. 
and Jennie Amanda (Mitchell) Tate; grandson of Rampson Preston and Dothea 
J. Mitchell; great-grandson of Rampson P. and Amanda (Hodge) Mitchell; 
great 2 -grandson of Pliilo Hodge, private Nineteenth Conn. Continentals, pen- 
sioned. 

PAUL. SANFORD THOMPSON, New Haven, Conn. (2031 8). Son of Sherwood 

Stratton and (Sanford) Thompson; grandson of Jeduthan and Amanda C. 

Thompson; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary Ann Thompson; great 2 -grandson 
of Jeduthan Thompson, private, Bradley's Conn. Matrosses, killed in New 
Haven Invasion, 1779. 

ROYAR DREW TOMLINSON, Milwaukee, Wis. (Conn. 20841). Son of William 
and Ruth (Drew) Tomlinson; grandson of Charles and Anna (Pearce) Tom- 
linso'n; great-grandson of Agur Tomlinson, private, Capt. Beach Tomlinson's 
Company Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Beach Tomlinson, Captain, Colonel 
Whiting's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

WILBUR F. TOMRINSON, Danbury, Conn. (19965). Son of William and Ruth 
(Drew) Tomlinson; grandson of Charles and Annie (Pearce) Tomlinson; great- 
grandson of Agur Tomlinson, private Conn, troops, pensioned; great 2 -grandson 
of Beach Tomlinson, Captain Fourth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

WILLIS HENRY UPSON, Kensington, Conn. (20319). Son of William and 
Mary Wilcox (Hart) Upson; grandson of Thomas and Jcrusha (Upson) 
Upson; great-grandson of Isaac and Sylvia (Lewis') Upson; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel Upson, Captain Fifteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM WAKEFIELD, Meriden, Conn. (20859). Son of At- 
wood and Albina (Nice) Wakefield; grandson of George Washington and 
Susan (Campbell) Wakefield; great-grandson of James A. and Thirza (Picket) 
Campbell; great 2 -grandson of James and Susanna (Coffee) Campbell; great 3 - 
grandson of Alexander Campbell, Lieutenant Colonel Sixth Lincoln County 
Rcgt. Mass. Militia. 

MARTIN WELLES, Hartford, Conn. (19966). Son oi Roger and Mercy (Delano) 
Welles; gntiidsnn of Roger and RIecta (Stanley) Welles; great-grandson of 
Roger Welles, Captain Conn. Continental Line. 

SAMUEL II. WHEELER, Fairfield, Conn. (20860). Son of Nathaniel and Unl- 
dah Ruth (Bradley) Wheeler; grandson of Lucius Brown and Adclia 
( ]Tickox) Bradley; great-grandson of Ancr Bradley, Lieutenant, Col. Roger 
Enos's Conn. Battalion, pensioned. 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS 225 

ALBERT PARSONS WHITE, Winsted, Conn. (2oS6r). Son of Henry K. and 
Harriet L. (Parsons) White; grandson of Benjamin II. and Betsey (Brooks) 
White; great-grandson of John and Chloe (Holden) White; great-grandson of 
Daniel Brooks, private, Colonel Simond's Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Mil- 
itia; great 3 -grandson of Israel ll'late, private, Captain Northrop's Company, 
First Battalion, Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade; grandson of Jolin and Sarah 
(Eockwood) Parsons; great-grandson of Frederick and Deborah (Reynolds) 
Lockwood; great-grandson of Nathaniel Reynolds, Lieutenant Conn, troops. 

GEORGE KEENER WILSON, Stratford, Conn. (19972). Son of George Keeler 
and Ellen (Bradley) Wilson; grandson of Daniel and Maria (Keeler) Wilson; 
great-grandson of David and Esther (Bradley) Keeler; great-grandson of 
Philip Burr Bradley, Colonel Conn, troops. 

JOSEPH RICE WINCIIELL, New Haven, Conn. (20312). Son of E'ltas and 
Fanny (Ely) Winched; grandson of Blisha Winchcll, Jr., private Eighteenth 
Regt. Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES SHERMAN YEOMANS, New Haven, Conn. (10067). Son of William 
Henry and Belle (Graham) Ycomnns; grandson of William and Betsey (Mc- 
kean) Yeomaus; greal-grandsbn of Eliphalct and Amcy (Brown) Yeomans; 
great-grandson of Asariah Brown, private Conn. Militia. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

SAMUEL M. ARNELL, Washington, D. C. (20431). Son of Samuel Mayes and 
Cornelia Churchwell (Orton) Arnell; grandson of James Morrison and Jean 
Frierson (Mayes) Arnell; great-grandson of Samuel Mayes, private, Col. 
Thomas Brandon's Pert. South Carolina Line. 

CONDIT SNIFFEN ATKINSON, Washington, D. C. (1070.?). Son of Francis A. 
and Emma M. Sniffen; grandson of Joseph K. and Catharine (Tallman) Gib- 
son; great-grandson of Thomas and Lydia (Kemp) Gibson; great-grandson of 
Robert Gibson, Sergeant Second Penna. Battalion; grerit 3 -grandson of John 
Gibson, private Fourth Penna. Battalion. (Name changed from Condit P. 
Sniffen to Condit Sniffen Atkinson.) 

THOMAS HARRIS ATKINSON, Jr., Washington, D. C. (19704). Son of Thomas 
II. and Martha (Richardson) Atkinson; grandson of John Atkinson, private 
Tenth North Carolina Regt. 

WADE HAMPTON ATKINSON, Washington, D. C. (19705). Son of Thomas 
II. and Martha (Richardson) Atkinson; grandson of John Atkinson, private 
Tenth North Carolina Regt. 

FRANK W. BARCLAY, Beatrice, Neb. (D. C. 2044;). Son of Francis and 
Frances (Hydon) Barclay; grandson of Robert and Laura (Burroughs) Bar- 
clay; great-grandson of Francis and Elizabeth (Wilson) Barclay; great 8 - 
grandso.n of John Barclay, private, Col. James Dunlap's Cumberland County 
Regt. Penna. Militia. 

FRED. IT. BARCLAY, Washington, D. C. (.-0446). Son of Francis and Frances 
(Hydon) Barclay; grandson of Robert and Laura (Burroughs) Barclay; great- 
grandson of Francis and Elizabeth (Wilson) Barclay; grcat*-'-grandson of John 
Barclay, private, Col. James Dunlap's Cumberland County Regt. Penna. 
Militia. 

HAROLD BLAKE, Washington, D. C. (10706). Son of John Crocker and Ma- 
tilda Jane (Givan) Blake; grandson of Joseph Harrington D. arid Aldana 
Croner (Crocker) Blake; great-grandson of Luke and Harriet F. (Harrington) 
Blake; great-grandson of Ephriam and Prudence (Leland) Harrington; grcat 3 - 
grandson of Moses Harrington, Captain Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES MORTON BRYANT, Washington, D. C. (20432). Son of Philip Dur- 
kee and .Sarah Paulina (Searl) Bryant; grandson of Philip and Sophia (She- 
pard) Bryant; great-grandson of John Bryant, private, Col. Jedidiah Hunting- 
ton's Eighth Conn. Regt. 

15 



226 



SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



HARRY CLARK CALDWELL, Washington, D. C. (1S179). (Supplemental,) Son 

of Charles T. and Caroline L. (Clartr) Caldwell; grandson of Henry J loiter 
and JCniily A. (Lewis) Clark; great-grandson of Henry and Hannah (Fedder) 
Clark-; grcat 2 -gYandson of Jacob (and Barbara Forney) Fedder, private Ninth 
Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia; grcat 3 -grandson of Peter Forney, 
private Tenth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

LOUIS JOSEPH CARMODY, Washington, D. C. (19707). Son of John Philip 
and Marian (Doyle) Carmody; grandson of James and Ann (Kcane) Doyle; 
great-grandson of John Doyle, Captain Independent Company Penna. troops. 
ELI KELLEY COLE, Lie.ut.-Col., U. S. Marine Corps, Carmel, N. Y. (D. C. 
20444). Son of Oncken \V. and Cornelia A. (Walker) Cole; grandson of 
Elihu V. and Harriet (Wood) Walker; great-grandson of William W. and 
Lucretia (Ferrill) Walker; grcat c -grandson of Joshua Walker, Jr., private, 
Capt. Joshua Walker, Sr.'s Company Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson .of Joshua 
Walker, Sr., Captain Mass. Militia. 

DAVID CARLETON CROWELL, Washington, D. C. (1970S). Son of David and 
Emma Louise (Van Dcrhoven) Crowell; grandson of Nathan and Harriet 
(Tucker) Crowell; great-grandson of Joseph Crowd!, private New Jersey 
Militia. 

EDWARD BUSHELL DANENHOWER, St. Louis, Mo. (D. C. 19709). Son of 
William Weaver and Ruth Rosana (Bushell) Danenhower; grandson of William 
Weaver and Llizabeth (Uber) Danenhower; great-grandson of Charles and 
Rachel (Weaver) Danenhower; great 2 -grandson of John Dancnfiozvcr, Quarter- 
master Pennsylvania troops; grandson of Edward and Llizabeth (Godman) 
Bushell; great-grandson of .Samuel and Rosana (Baldwin) Godman; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Baldzvin, private Maryland Line. 

BLISS NASH DAVIS, Washington, D. C. (19710). Son of Charles Henry and 
Mary Ann (Cree) Davis; grandson of Bliss Nash and Hepzie 1\. (Bell) Davis; 
great-grandson of James and Lucy (Dean) Bell; great'-'-grandson of Paul and 
Llizabeth (Ruggles) Dean; grcaC-grandson of fidzvard Ruggles, private Mass. 
Militia, Lexington Alarm. 

ALPHONSO GROSVENOR DRAKE, Washington, D. C. (20438). Sou of George 
Nelson Lindsley and Jane (b'ern) Drake; grandson of Joel Bartlctt and Mary 
(Nelson) Drake; great-grandson of George Nelson, private Mass. Militia, Marine 
Brig "Pallas," ship "Julius C;csar," and other vessels, pensioned. 

WILLIAM ALLEN ERSKINE, La Boca, Canal Zone, Panama (D. C. 19711), Son 
of William A. and Almira Frost (Hudson) Lrskine; grandson of Shepherd J. 
and Jane (McRaley) Frost; great-grandson of Winthrop Frost, drummer boy 
New Hampshire troops. 

FRANK FRIDAY FLETCHER, United States Navy (D. C. 19721). Son of James 
Duncan and Nancy Powers (Jack) Fletcher; grandson of John and Rachacl 
(Fletcher) Fletcher; groat-grandson of Archibald Fletcher, Ensign Third Com- 
pany, Second Battalion Bedford County Penna. Militia; grandson of Thomas 
and Isabella (Miller) Jack; great-grandson of John Jack, private, Col, Lochrey's 
Penna. Regt. ; great-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Grier) Miller; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Miller, Captain Eighth Penna. Regt. 

PHILIP BURWELL GOODE, Washington, D. C. (20.133). Son of George Brown 
and Sarah Ford (Judd) Goode; grandson of Francis Collier and Sarah Wood- 
ruff (Crane) Goode; great-grandson of Israel Cooper and Hannah (Lyon) 
Crane; great grandson of Israel Crane, private and cornet Lssex Troop of 
Light Horse, New Jersey Militia; grandson of Orange and Sarah Lamson 
(I-'ord) Judd; great-grandson of Ozias and Rliruamn (Wright) Judd; great 8 - 
grandson of Orange Judd, private Berkshire County Mass. Militia; great 2 - 
grandson of David Wright, private New York Militia. 

EZRA GOULD, Washington, D. C. (20441). Son of William Warren and I.ydia A. 
Gould; grandson of Amos and Sarah Cotten (Downer) Could; great-grandson 
of Seneca and .Matilda Downer; great-'-grandsou of Cyprian Downer, Captain, 
Colonel ITcrrick's Regt. Vermont Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 227 

JOHN PIAIX, Lampasas, Texas (D. C. 19722). Son of Ira and Rachel -(.Thompson) 
Hall; grandson of Ira and Rebecca (Parker) IIa',1; great-grandson of Nathaniel 
Hall, Jr., Lieutenant, Col. Jonathan Chase's New Hampshire Regt 

BERNARD HOOE HARRISON, Washington, D. C. (20435)- Son of ' Bernard 
Hooe and Margaret Josephine (Plaster) Harrison; grandson of John Peyton 
and Ann (Hooe) Harrison; great-grandson of Richard Harrison, musician, Col. 
John Gunby's Seventh Maryland Regt. 

STANTON WREN HOWARD, Washington, D. C. (20442). Son of Stanton 
Morton and Mary Eliza (Grindall) Howard; grandson of John Thomas and 
EHza (Armstrong) Grindall; great-grandson of John Gibson and Ellen 
(Wheeler) Grindall; grcaF'-grandson of Thomas Wheeler, private, Captain 
Holland's Company Maryland Flying Camp. 

JOHN GRINNELL JOHNSON, Washington, D. C. (19712). Son of John Peter 
and Hetty Chittenden (Chapman) Johnson; grandson of Horace and Susan 
(Chittenden) Chapman'; great-grandson of Jedediah Chapman, Captain Conn. 
Militia, Sergeant First Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned; great-grandson of Cor- 
nelius Chittenden, private .Second Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 

STUART CLARK JOHNSON, Washington, D. C. (19713). Son of Jerome 
Fletcher and Eliza (Woodruff) Johnson; grandson of James Gibson and Susan 
(Bowen) Johnson; great-grandson of Jeremiah Johnson, private First Regt. 
New Hampshire Line. 

CLARENCE NORTHROP JONES, Captain, U. S. Army, Fort Myer, Va. (D. C. 
20437). Son of John Wesley and Maria (Cochrane) Jones;, grandson of John 
Cook and Sarah (Cooper) Cochrane; great-grandson of William and Sarah 
(Craig) Cooper; great-grandson of James Craig, private, Colonel Ouacken- 
bos's Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

NEWTON LANDON, Washington, D. C. (10714). Son of Eldaah and Lucy 
(Lovcridge) La.ndon; grandson of Laban London, private Second New Jersey 
Regt.; grandson of William S. and Tryphene (Dole) Lovcridge; great-grandson 
of William Lovcridge, private Seventh Regt. Conn. Militia. 

ROBERT CATHCART LIPSCOMB, Spartanburg, S. C. (D. C. 20443). Son of 
William Smith and Albertine (Goudclock) Lipscomb; grandson of Uyatte and 
Rebecca (Lockhart) Lipscomb; great-grandson of Smith and Agnes (Smith) 
Lipscomb; great--gran<lson of William Lipscomb, Fife-Major Eighth Virginia 
Regt. 

UPTON BEAL McCANDLISH, Westernport, Md. (D. C. 19724), Son of Robert 
John and Ann Walke (Shield) McCandlish; grandson of Charles Hansford and 
Susan M. (Walke) Shield; great-grandson of Anthony Walke, patriot clergy- 
man', Princess Anne County, Va.; great 2 -grandson of Anthony Walke, Member 
of Virginia House of Burgesses. 

MAX McCULLOUGH, Washington, D. C. (19715). Son of Nathaniel Nelson and 
Laura V. (Allen) McCullough; grandson of John R. and Eden R. (Bennett) 
Allen; great-grandson of James and Ann (King) Allen; great 2 -grandson of 
John Allen, private New Jersey Continental Line. 

ELBERT E. PROVONCHER MARTIN, Detroit, Mich. (D. C. 20440). Son of EH 
and Katie E. (Martin) Provoncher; grandson of Bowman Bishop and Catherine 
Davis (Pratt) Martin; great-grandson of John and Lavina (Burnap) Pratt; 
great-'-grandson of Ebenezcr and Thankful (Singletary) Burnap; great-grand- 
son of Thankful Singletary, Representative from Sutton in Mass. Provincial 
Congress. 

NEWTON FLTPHALET MASON, U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C. (19723). 'Son 
of Gorden Fowler and Alary Ann Mason; grandson of Lliphalct and Roxey 
(Fowler) Mason; great-grandson of Ebcnescr Mason, Sergeant, Capt. Clark's 
Company, Col. Johnson's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HERMAN HOWARD PECHIN, Washington, D. C. (204;;,). Son of .Maurice and 
Katharine (Grossman) IV, Fin; grandson of Jacob Hayward and Abby (Whit- 



228 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

man) Crossman; great-grandson of Rufus and Experience (Hayward) Cross- 
man; great-grandson of John and Betsey (Hayward) Hayward; grcat a -grand- 
son of Jacob Hayward, private, Lieut. Joshua Alden's Detachment, Col. 
Edward Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 

ALLEN STEELE PECK, Washington, D. C. (19716). Son of Charles Bickford 
and Josephine Alice (Steele) Peck; grandson of Allen and Clarissa Phillips 
(Wright) Steele; great-grandson of Elisha and Lucy (Phillips) Wright; great-- 
grandson of Elisha Wright, Sergeant Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM HENRY PROCTOR, Washington, D. C. (20426). Son of Jonathan N. 
and Betsey (Briggs) Proctor; grandson of Oliver and Sarah (Drake) Proctor; 
great-grandson of Oliver Proctor, private, Col. William Prescott's Regt. Mass. 
Minute Men. 

CHRISTOPHER HENRY SHEARER, Reading, Pa. (D. C. 20428). Son of Peter 
Diem and Emma Susan (Fisher) Shearer; grandson of Christopher and Cathrin 
(Deem) Shearer; great-grandson of Jonathan and Mary (Rapp) Shearer; great-- 
grandson of Christopher Shearer, Sergeant, Capt. John Diehl's Company Penna. 
Militia. 

THOMAS HORACE SLAVENS, Washington, D. C. (10717). Son of Zenas L. 
and Irene (Stanley) Slavens; grandson of James Harvey and Louisa (Roundce) 
Slavcns; great-grandson of Stuart and Hendrix Slavens; grcat 2 -grandson of 
Isaiah Slavens, private Virginia troops, pensioned. 

WILLIAM HOWE SOMERVELL, Washington, D. C. (14908). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Benjamin Carr and Alice Willoughhy (Norris) Somervell; grandson of 
William G. and Elizabeth F. (Davis) Norris; great-grandson of James and 
Alary (Willoughhy) Norris, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of James Norris, Second 
Lieutenant, Col. Edward Cockey's Battalion Maryland Militia. 

ALEXANDER RAMSEY SPEEL, Washington, D. C. (20439). Son of John L. 
and Margaret (Ramsey) Specl; grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Kelker) 
Ramsey; great-grandson of Alexander Ramsey. Lieutenant Fourth Penna. Con- 
tinental Line; great-grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Greenawalt) Kelker; 
great--grandson of Philip L. Greenawalt, Colonel First Lancaster County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia; great s -grandson of Anthony Kelker, Lieutenant First 
Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

FRANCIS ALPHONZO ST. CLAIR, Washington, D. C. (19719)- Son of Alphonzo 
Turrell and Savilla Loomis (Thurston) St. Clair; grandson of Charles Nor- 
throp and Elmina Baldwin (Turrell) St. Clair; great-grandson of James and 
Patience Matilda Knowles (Northrop) St. Clair; great-'-grandson of James St. 
Clair, Sergeant New Hampshire Rangers; great 3 -grandson of Thomas St. Clair, 
private, Colonel Sliekney's New Hampshire Regt. 

WILLIAM SYDENHAM TORBERT, Washington, D. C. (20436). Son of John 
Peyton and Elizabeth C. (Bryant) Torbert; grandson of John Yarnall and Anna 
J. (Moulder) Bryant; great-grandson of John Nicholson and Mary (Uhler) 
Moulder; great-grandson of William and Martha (Duncan) Moulder; great 8 - 
grandson of William Moulder, Second Lieutenant Fourth Penna. Battalion. 

JOHN VAN SCI-IAICK, Jr., Washington, D. C. (20427). Son of John and 
Frances E. (Shaver) Van Schaick; grandson of Charles II. and Salina (Hynds) 
Shaver; great-grandson of Peter and Ann Eliza (Schuyler) Hynds; great 3 - 
grandson of David and Elizabeth (Sawyer) Schuyler; greaD-grandson of 
Lawrence Scnvyer, Sergeant Fifth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

PHILIP WALKER, Washington, D. C. (7052). (Supplemental.) Son of George 

and Sarah Dwight (Bliss) Walker; grandson of James and Sally (Smith) 

Walker; great-grandson of Joshua and Mary (Whitmore) Walker; great--grand- 

, son of Joshua Walker, Captain Eighth Foot Company, Second Middlesex Regt. 

Mass. Militia. 

LEVI SPAULDING WARREN, Albion, Mich. (D. C. 14286). (Supplemental.) 
Sou of Samuel Nott and Anna Keeler (West) Warren; grandson of David and 
Susannah (Spaulding) Warren; great-grandson of David Warren, private, 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS 22Q 

Capt. Benjamin Hickok's Company Vermont Militia; great-grandson of Sump- 
son Spaulding, Sergeant, Col. Jonathan Latimer's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

THOMAS AUGUSTINE WEEDON, Washington, D. C. (19720). Son of lames 
Hervey and Fannie Eleanor (Ciddings) Weedon; grandson of John Catesby 
and Elizabeth (Trone) Weedon; great-grandson of Augustine Weedon, Sergeant 
Virginia Line. 

ABRAM R. WINGATE, Washington, D. C. (20429). Son of John D. and 
Catherine (Wolf) Wingate; grandson of John and Catherine (Struphar) Wolf; 
great-grandson of Michael and Barbara (Foyer) Struphar; great--grandson of 
Ozicl Boycr, private Eighth Regt. Penna. Line. 

FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

FRANK B. BRUCE, Pensacola, Fla. (11771). Son of William II. and Constance 
T. Bruce; grandson of Henry C. and Jane C. Bruce; great-grandson of JFi7- 
liam Bruce, Captain First Maryland Regt. 

WILLIAM MERRILL CORRY, Quincy, Fla. (11774)- Son of William and Maria 
Virginia (Kohler) Corry; grandson of Arthur and Ellen (Tallman) Curry; 
great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Blauvelt) Tallman; grcat 2 -grandspn of 
Abrahatn Blauvelt, Jr., private Third New York Continental Regt. 

WILLIAM HARPER DAVIDSON, Quincy, Fla. (11773)- Son of J. E. A. and 
Mary A. (Elms) Davidson; grandson of John M. W. and Mary (Sylvester) 
Davidson; great-grandson of John M. \V. Davidson; great 2 -grandson of John 
and Sail ic Harper (Brevard) Davidson; great 3 -grandson of John Davidson, 
Major North Carolina troops, signer of Mecklenburg "Declaration of Inde- 
pendence,." 1775. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DILLON, Jacksonville, Fla. (1177-)- Son of James 
and Martlia Ann (Williamson) Dillon; grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth 
(Roberts) Williamson; great-grandson of Robert and Lucy (Conyers) Wil- 
liamson; great'-'-grandson of John Conyers, Captain Georgia troops. 

THOMAS HODGKINS HARRIS, Havana, Cuba (Fla. 11770). Son of Anderson 
Mills and Josephine Smalhvood (Gibson) Harris; grandson of Edward Rey- 
nolds and Jennette Irons (Tilton) Gibson; great-grandson of Nchetniah Tilton, 
Colonel, Commissary of Musters, Delaware. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON SCHUYLER, Cocoa, Fla. (11768). Son of Robert and 
Lucinda (Wood) Schuyler; grandson of Philip J. and Mary Ann (Rutsen) 
Schuyler; great-grandson of Philip Schuyler, Major-General Continental Army. 

FRANCIS HENRY SHEPPARD, St. Andrew, Fla. (20676). Son of Henry and 
Rhoda (Nixon) Sheppard; grandson of Henry and Sarah (Ruck) Sheppard; 
great-grandson of Joseph Buck, Lieutenant Second Regt. New Jersey Line. 

WILLIAM HENRY TIPPETTS, St. Petersburg, Fla. (11775). Son of Charles J. 
and Ebza (Sanford) Tippctts; grandson of James and Sarah (Wetmore) Tip- 
petts; great-grandson of Bcla Wetmore, private Third Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE MORTIMER WEST, Panama City, Fla. (11769). Son of Philander 
Bailey and Fidelia (Mason) West; grandson uf Freeman and Sally West; 
great-grandson of John West, private Rhode Island Militia; great 2 -grandson 
of William West, Jr., Brigadier-General Rhode Island troops. 

HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

ISAIAH BRAY, Quarantine Island, Hawaii (18948). Son of Jeremiah and Jane 
G. (Gould) Bray; grandson of Isaiah and Thankful (Hallet) liray; great- 
grandson of William Bray, private, Colonel Freeman's Mass. Regt. 

HARRY ARTHUR JUEN, Honolulu, Hawaii (20401). Son of Henry and Emily 
M. (Jones) Juen; grandson of Reynolds and Albina (Allen) Jones; great- 
grandson of William and Mercy (Stevens) Allen; great 2 -grandson of William 
Allen, private "Green Mountain Boys" Vermont Militia. 



2.XQ SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

HENRY BREWSTER MARINER, Honolulu, Hawaii (20402). Son of Silas 
Henry Winthrop and Lucy .Adelaide (Parrott) Mariner; grandson of Silas and 
Deborah T. (Stanwood) Mariner; great-grandson of John Mariner, Sergeant, 
Capt. JpsepL Pride's Company Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Winthrop 
Stamvood, private, Capt. John Kettell's Company, Major Nathaniel Heath's 
Detachment of Mass. Guards. 

HOWARD CHARLES MOIIR, Honolulu, Hawaii (20403). Son of Charles Shoe- 
maker and Katherinc Anna (Kershncr) Mohr; grandson of Daniel and Eliza- 
beth (Umbenhour) Kershner; great-grandson of Samuel and Magdalen (Leon- 
ard) Umbenhour; grcat 2 -granclson of Philip Leonard, private hirst and Ninth 
Regis. Penna. Line; grandson of Charles Iluey and Sophia (Shoemaker) 
Mohr; great-grandson of Charles and Elizabeth (Kershner) Shoemaker; grcal 2 - 
grandson of Charles Shoemaker, Member Penna. Provincial Conference uf 
1776, Solicitor for Continental loans. 

FRED ROCKWELL NUGENT, Honolulu, Hawaii ( 1 8950). Son of Thomas Carr 
and Juliett Maria (Rockwell) Nugent; grandson of Peter King and Maria 
Dorcas (Roll) Rockwell; great-grandson of William (and Dorcas Forster) Dell, 
Captain Lancaster County Penna. Assoeiators; greats-grandson of John Forster, 
private [,ancnslc-r County Penna. Associators. 

EDWARD WAITE TIIWING, Honolulu, Hawaii (18940). Son of Edward Pay- 
son and Susan Maria (Waite) Timing; grandson of Thomas and Grace Welch 
(Barnes) Thwing; great-grandson of Nicholas Thzving, Corporal Mass. Conti- 
nental troops; great 2 -grandson of John Thzving, Sergeant Mass. Militia. 

IDAHO SOCIETY. 

(The Idaho Society, organized April 8, 1909, includes, besides the following, a 
number of members resident in Idaho transferred from other State Societies.) 

STANLY ALEXANDER EASTON, Kellogg, Idaho (21169). Son of Giles Alex- 
ander and Mary Es.ther (Gushce) Easton; grandson of Samuel and Fanny 
(Ives) Easton ; great-grandson of Samuel Easton, Corporal, Col. Samuel B. 
Webb's Conn. Regt. 

CHARLES THORNDYKE HAWKES, Caldwell, Idaho (2117:). Son of Win- 
field Scott and Abbie Augusta (Young) Hawkes; grandson of Abraham R. 
and Mary Thorndyke (Mascall) Young; great-grandson of Stephen and Anna 
(Thorndyke) Mas. all; great-'-grandson of Stephen Mascall, Commander of 
Mass. Privateer "General L'ulnam." 

IVAR GRANT HOLLIDAY, Boise, Idaho (21167). Son of Richard Thomas and 

Minnie S. (Ncsbitt-Pbwers) Holliday; grandson of Elias Langem and Eliza- 

- beth (Vandiver) Holliday; great-grandson of Richard and Ann (McDonald) 

Holliday; grcat--grandson of Angus McDonald, Lieutenant Colonel Virginia 

troops. 

RICHARD HARVEY JOHNSON, Poise, Idaho (21168). Son of Richard Z. and 
Katherinc- P. Johnson; grandson of Harvey If. and Calista Fatima (Munger) 
Johnson; great-grandson of Elias Munger, private, Colonel Ward's and other 
Rcgts. Conn. Militia. 

JOHN HENRY MYER, Poise, Idaho (21170). Son of George W. and Elizabeth 
Urmy) Myer; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Van Orden) Urrny; great- 
grandson of Andrew Van Orden, private Dutchess County New York Militia. 

JAMES LONA SALMON STEWART, Boise, Idaho (21 166). Son of Salmon 
Cowles and Ellen (Goldsmith) Stewart; grandson of James Andrew and Lu- 
cinda (Cowles) Stewart; great-grandson of Salmon and Poby (Miner) Cowles; 
great-grandson of Noah Cowles, private Conn. Militia, Marine on ship "Wash- 
ington" in battle of Lake Champlain, prisoner, pensioned. 

FRANKLIN CAMPBELL SMITH, Pocatello, Idaho (20.10.;). Son of Edwin 
Ruthven and Adelaide (Campbell) Smith; grandson of Robert and Catherine 
(Rogers) Campbell; great-grandson of Alexander Rogers, private, Capt. Jordan 
Parker's Company Mass. Militia. 



KI£CIST1\K 01 ? NEW MEMBERS 23I 

BERNARD LYNCH STAYNER, Boise, Idaho (20491). Son of Henry Wheeler 
and Marian Reid (Hempstead) Stayner; grandson of Benjamin Franklin and 
Mary (Sprague) Hempstead; great-grandson of Stephen and Martha (Tinker) 
Hempstead; great-grandson of William Hempstead, Second Corporal, First 
Company, Third Regt. .Conn. Militia; great :! -grandson of Joshua Hempstead, 
private First Company, Third Regt. Conn. Militia. 

DAVID ABSALOM STUBBLEFIELD, Boise, Idaho (21165). Son of Robert W. 

and Jcannette (Cowan) Stubblefield; grandson of Absalom and Eliza (Pier- 
son) Stubbleficld; great-grandson of Robert and Sarah (Funk) Stubblefield; 
great-grandson of Edward and Lightfoot (Mumford) Stubblefield; grcat 3 - 
grandson of William Green Mumford, Colonel Virginia troops, Deputy Com- 
missary General of Issues. 

ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

GEORGE BUTLER ASHLEY, Chicago, 111. (19788). Son of Elisha Wheeler and 
Sarah Ashley; grandson of Harry and Dorothy (Powers) Ashley; great-grand- 
son of William Ashley, Sergeant Vermont Militia. 

ARTHUR JEROME ATWATER, Morgan Pari:, 111. (20286). Son of John Bow- 
man and -Lauretta (Allen) Atwater; grandson of Jeremiah and Lucey (Tillcy) 
Atwater; great-grandson of Caleb and Thankful (Cotter) Atwater; great 3 - 
grandson of Samuel Atwater, drummer Seventh Company, Col. William 
Douglas's Conn. Regt. 

DANIEL PERRY BARKER, Sparta, 111. (20SS5). Son of Daniel M. and Rachel 
Barker; grandson of Zebediali Barker, Sergeant, Col. Thomas Poor's Mass. 
Regt. 

GEORGE II. BATCHELDER, Evanston, 111. (20289). Son of George W. and 
Helen M. (Bartine) Batchelder; grandson of George Batchclder; great-grand- 
son of Isaac and Margaretta (Suter-Davis) Batchclder; great-grandson of 
Amos Batclielder, private, Colonel Gerrish's and Colonel Nixon's Mass. Regts. 

EDWIN BEGGS, Ashland, 111. (20S8S). Son of James L. and Mary A. (Crow) 
Beggs; grandson of Charles and Mary (Ruddle) Beggs; great-grandson of 
Thomas Beggs, Sergeant Fourth Penna. Line. 

JOHN BEGGS, Ashland, 111. (18382). Son of Charles and Mary (Ruddcl) Beggs; 
grandson of Thomas Beggs, Sergeant Fourth Penna. Line. 

GEORGE MARSHALL BLACK, Oak Park, 111. (19800). Son of John and 
Rachel (Patterson) Black; grandson of James and Letitia (Gardner) Patter- 
son; great-grandson of James Patterson, zd, private Lancaster County Penna. 
Militia. 

CLARENCE J. BEAKER, Chicago, 111. (20293). Son of Julian and Amanda 
(Skinner) Blaker; grandson of Charles and Sarah Margaret (Bennett) Blaker; 
great-grandson of Isaac and Jane (Corson) Bennett; great-grandson of Ben- 
jamin Corsmt, private Sixth Associated Company of Southampton Township, 
Bucks County Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES MATTHEW BOWCOCK, Springfield, 111. (20877). Son of James M. 
and Anna (Baker) Bowcock; grandson of John Jason and Sarah Taliaferro 
(Barksdale) Bowcock; great-grandson of Nelson and Jane (Lewis) Barksdale; 
great-grandson of Jesse Pitman Lezvis, private Virginia Continental I, inc. 

DAVID CASSATT BRINKERHOFF, Springfield, 111. (20288). Son of John and 
Sarah Ann (Waller.) BrinkerhoiT; grandson of George J. and Ida (Cassatt) 
Brinkerhoff ; great-grandson of John BrinkerhoiT, private, Swope's Flying Bat- 
talion of York County Penna. Volunteers. 

EARLE WILLIAM BUTLER, Canton, 111. (20280). Son of Charles T. and 
Anna R. (Blocksom) Butler; grandson of Lyman and Eunice (Southmaid) 
Butler; great-grandson of William Butler, private, Colonel Bradley's Conn. ' 
Regt. and other service, prisoner, pensioned. 



232 SONS OP THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

FRANK C. CALDWELL, Oak Park, 111. (19798). Son of Henry Wallace and 
Hannah Ann (North) Caldwell; grandson of Robert F. and Julia C. Caldwell; 
great-grandson of Robert and Margaret (Cook) Caldwell; great 2 -grandson of 
Alexander CaldiveU, private, Lieutenant Nesbit's Company Penna. Frontier 
Rangers. 

ARTHUR ROY.CE CAMP, Chicago, 111. (19796). Son of Andrew Royce and 
Florence (Jewell) Camp; grandson of Abel and Charlotte (Taplin) Camp; 
great-grandson of Gould and Elizabeth (Knox) Camp; great-'-grandson of Abel 
Camp, private, Captain Stoddard's Company Conn. Militia. 

MEEVIEEE FAMES COLLINS, Park Ridge, 111. (20270). Son of James Ryan 
and Margaret C. (Walker) Collins; grandson of Thomas Cresap and Rachel 
(Ryan) Collins; great-grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Cresap) Collins; 
great--grandson of Daniel Cresap, Member of Committee of Safety; great 3 - 
grandson of Tliomas Cresap, Leader of Sons of Liberty of Frederick County, 
Md. 

EDWARD COOK, Oak Park, 111. (20283). Son of Benjamin and Nancy (Nare) 
Cook; grandson of John Cook (Johannes Koch), private, Capt. Andrew Dil- 
lcnbach's Company New York Minute Men. 

ISAAC ELSTON COOK, Lexington, 111. (20294). Son of Isaac Newton and 
Hannah (Pell) Cook; grandson of Stephen and* Susanna (Elston) Cook, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Stephen and Sarah (McFarland) Cook; great--grandson of 
Daniel McFarland, Colonel of McFarland Rangers of Pennsylvania. 

JOHN WOLFERSPERGER DAVIS, Chicago, 111. (20287). Son of William White 
and Margaret (Wolfersperger) Davis; grandson of Gabriel and Susanna Ro- 
land (Diller) Davis; great-grandson of Archibald Douglas and Julianna Bar- 
ton (Anderson) Davis; great--grandson of Gabriel Da-eis, Member Committee 
of Safety, and private, Capt. Samuel Boyd's Company, Col. John Ferrce's 
Penna. Battalion. 

SAMUEL B. ERV1N, Tuscola, 111. (20290). Son of William Brown and Eliza- 
beth (Rice) Erviri; grandson of Jared and Sally (Ilerron) Ervin; great- 
grandson of Thomas Ilerron, private Seventh Regt. Penna. Militia. 

GILES STOLP FARMER, Wankegan, 111. (20879). Son of William Grove and 
Hannah L. (Stolp) Farmer; grandson of Lemuel and Roxanna (Rathbun) 
Farmer; great-grandson of Henry IVillard Farmer, private, Col. John Whit- 
comb's and Lieut. Col. Ephraim Sawyer's Mass. Regts. 

WILLIAM. LEMUEL FARMER, Waukegan, 111. (20278). Son of William Grove 
and Hannah L. (Stolp) Farmer; grandson of Lemuel and Roxanna (Rathbun) 
Farmer; greatrgrandson of Henry IVillard Farmer, private, Colonel Whit- 
comb's Regt. Mass. Minute Men at Lexington Alarm, and Colonel Sawyer's 
Regt. 

LOUIS JESSE FLETCHER, Chicago, 111. (19795). Son of Osias W. and Eliza 
Ann (Briggs) Fletcher; grandson of Isaac Fletcher; great-grandson of Solo- 
mon Fletcher; grcat 2 -grandson of Ebenezcr Fletcher, private, Colonel Prcs- 
cott's Regt. Mass. Minute Men. 

HARRY FOX, La Grange, 111. (20300). Son. of Henry and Margaret Ann (Shep- 
herd) Fox; grandson of Christopher C. and Nancy (Suits) Fox; great-grand- 
son of Christopher Fox, Second Major, Colonel Klock's Tryon County Regt. 
New York Militia; grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Preston) Shepherd; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Nellie (Schenek) Shepherd; great--grandson of 
Flislia (and Alleta Alice Smock) Shepherd, Captain Monmoutli County New 
Jersey Militia; great-grandson of John Smock, Lieutenant Colonel First Regt. 
Artillery of Monmouth County, New Jersey; great-grandson of John Suits, 
fifer, Colonel Klock's Tryon County Regt. New York Militia. 
WILLIAM HENRY FRENCH, Oak Park, 111. (20202). Sen of Nathan and Har- 
riet Newell (Tloyt) French; grandson of David and Patience (Clapp) IToyt; 
great-grandson of David Iloyt (Hoit), Lieutenant, Captain Bradley's Company 
Vermont Militia. 



REGISTER ()!• NEW MEMBERS 233 



FRANK PLINY GRAVES, Chicago, 111. (20884). Son of John B. and Prances 
Elizabeth (Greene) Graves; grandson of John Lynde and Julia Laura (Castle) 
Greene; great-grandson of Daniel C. and Elizabeth G. (Lyri.de) Greene; 
great 2 -grandson of Elcazcr Greene, private, Col. John Wead's Conn. Regt.; 
great-'-grandson of Jonathan Lynde, private First and other Mass. Regts., pen- 
sioned; great-grandson of Jonathan and Frances P. (O'Brien) Castle; great 2 - 
grandson of Abel Castle, private, Cul. Gideon Warren's and other Vermont 
Regis. 

SAMUEL MILES HASTINGS, Eyanston, 111. (20282), Son of Eli and Rachel 
Whitehall (Kerr) Hastings; grandson of Eli and Catherine (Foster) Hastings; 
great-grandson of John Hastings, private, Capt. Enoch Hastings's Company, 
Lancaster County Penna. Militia. 

PHILIP CORNELIUS HAYES, Joliet, 111. (20296). Son of Gaylord and Alary 
Goodrich (Humphrey) Hayes; grandson of Ezelciali (and Mary Cossit) II ayes, 
private Fifth Regt. Conn. Continental Line; great-grandson of Andrczv Hayes, 
private Seventh Regt. Conn. Continental Line; great-grandson of Timothy 
Cossit, Lieutenant, Colonel Huntington's Regt. Conn. Line. 

NORMAN BROADWELL HICKOX, Springfield, 111. (10797). Son of Harris and 
Louise (Broadwell) Hickox; grandson of Norman McAlbain and Virginia 
(lies) Broadwell; great-grandson of Baxter and Mary (Lindsly) • Broadweil; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Lindsly, Captain of Artificers, Colonel Baldwin's 
Corps Continental Line. 

WILLIAM. EMMETT IIIGBEE, Chicago, 111. (20297). Son of William W. and 
Nancy Jane (Harvey ) Iligbcc; grandson of John W. and Nancy (Jenkins) 
Harvey; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Wright) Harvey; great'--grand- 
son of Edward Harvey, private, Col. William Grayson's Virginia Continental 
Regt., pensioned. 

GEORGE WALLACE HUBBARD, Oak Park, 111. (20281). Son of George Wyllys 
and Edna (Post) Hubbard; grandson of F,ben Willard and Mary Elizabeth 
(Stiekncy) Post; great-grandson of William Augustus and Mary (Bolles) 
Stickney; great 2 -grandson of William Stickney; great 3 -grandson of Eleaser 
Stiekncy, Second Lieutenant, Col. Bridge's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Thomas 
Scranton and Jane Fli/a (Woodruff) Hubbard; great-grandson of George and 
Electa (Bronson) Hubbard; great-'-grandson of Pliincas Branson, private Conn, 
troops; great 3 -grandson of Asa Brunson, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM. BALDWIN DULY, Chicago, HI. (20284). Son of William and Vir- 
ginia (Stokes) Iluey; grandson of David and Maria (Slice) Stokes; great- 
grandson of Parke and Rachel (Wilkinson) Slice; great"-grandson of Bcrtlcs 
Slice, Paymaster, Colonel Patton's Penna. Regt. 

GEORGE NOBLE KREIDER, Springfield, 111. (1979O. Son of Edmund Cicero 
and Mary (Gates) Kreider; grandson of Michael Zimmerman and Sidney Ann 
(Rees) Kreider; great-grandson of Daniel and Salome (Carpenter) Kreider; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Michael Kreider, Deputy Commissary Penna. troops. 

GEORGE FRANKLIN LONG, Springfield, 111. (20881). Son of Benjamin Frank- 
lin and Lucy (Martin) Long; grandson of Moses Lony,, private, Colonel Wes- 
son's Ninth Regt. Mass. Bay troops. 

LUZFRNE DOW LOWELL, Chicago, 111. (19789). Son of Reuben and Cathe- 
rine (Secber) Lowell; grandson of Abraham and Sally ([union) Lowell; great- 
grandson of Moses I.i'zccll, private New Hampshire "Militia. 

CHARLES STEWART NORTHROP, Woodstock, 111. (208S6). Son of James 
and Rachel Ann (De Laiualer) Northrop; grandson of Peter L. and Mary 
( Drink) De Lamater; great-grandson of Cornelius C. Brinek, or Brink, Ser- 
geant First Ulster County Regt. New York Militia; great" grandson of Corne- 
lius Brinckj or Brink, Sergeant First Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

HARRY GALE NYE, Chicago, 111. (2087S). Son of Ralph W. and Julia (Gale) 
Nye; grandson of Zadoc Allen and Rebecca Jane (Wildridge) Nye; great- 
grandson of Joshua and Anna (Snow) Nye; grcat'-'-grandsou of Benjamin Nye, 
private, Colonel Freeman's Mass. Regt. 



234 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

SAMUEL WALTER OSGOOD, Chicago, 111. (10300). Son of Samuel Waller 
and Elizabeth Kendall (Olds) Osgood; grandson of Samuel and Catherine 
Ann (Hurling) Osgood; great-grandson of Walter Franklin and Ellen Osgood; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Osgood, Brigade Major Mass. troops, Member 
Mass. Provincial Congress and Delegate to Continental Congress.' 

CECIL PAGE, Chicago, 111. (19793)- Son of Samuel S. and Lucea A. (Robinson) 
Pago; grandson of Thaddeus and Cordillia E- (Shope) Page; great-grandson 
of John and Betsey (Wilson) Page; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Wilson {Will- 
son),. Captain, Stark's New Hampshire Brigade. 

JOEL BYRON PAINE, Chicago, 111. (-0876). Son of Joel Clinton and Lucy 
(Collins) Paine; grandson of Asahel King and Frances (Jones) Paine; great- 
grandson of Edward Paine, Captain, Colonel Wells's Conn. Regt. 

CHARLES TEMPLE PALMER, Chicago, 111. (20291). Son of John J. and 
Elizabeth Palmer; grandson of Thomas and Sarah Franklin (Bryson) Palmer; 
great-grandson of Thomas Palmer, Commander of I'enna. Brig "Mercury." 

ORIAN JAMES READ, Srt., Memphis, Tenn. (111. 20295). Son of Theodore 
Dumont and Frances Elizabeth (Billingsly) Read; grandson of James Kelley 
and Sarah (Eastin) Read; great-grandson of Phillip Eastin, Lieutenant Fourth 
and Eighth Rcgts. Virginia Continental Line, pensioned. 

WILLIAM P. RICHARDS, Jerseyville, 111. (19790). Son of John L. C. and 

' Mary A. (Corbett) Richards; grandson of Penuel and Charlotte (Bourne) 

Corbett; great-grandson of John Corbett, private Mass. Continental troops; 

great-grandson of Shearjashub and Rachel (Kent) Bourne; great 2 -grandson of 

Shearjashub Bourne, Member Rhode Island Assembly and Committee on War. 

GEORGE LIVINGSTON ROOT, Houston, Texas (111. 20882). Son of William 
Duane and Laura Alabama (Tatum) Root; grandson of Oliver and Maria 
(Judson) Root; great-grandson of Gideon Root, Lieutenant Eleventh Com- 
pany, Col. David Mosely's Third Mass. Regt. 

ASIIBEL V. SMITH, Waukegan, 111. (20299). Son of William B. and Alice L. 
(Paddock) Smith; grandson of William Robert and Nancy (Stickney) Pad- 
dock; great-grandson of David and Cynthia (Culver) Stickney; grcat--grand- 
son of Jeremiah Stickney, private, Colonel Nixon's and Major Gage's Mass. 
Regts. ; great-grandson of Robert and Lucy (Backus) Paddock; great-grand- 
son of Stephen Backus, seaman, and lifer in Capt. Andrew Baekus's Company 
Conn, troops, pensioned, 

ALBERT HOWELL SPEULDA, Springfield, 111. (20887). Son of Martin W. 
and Flaria Field (Magic) Speulda; grandson of Ambrose Howell and Sallie 
Ann (Bruen) Magic; great-grandson of Isaac Harris and Mary Ann (Pierson) 
Bruen; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin and Aureantia (Harris) Bruen; great 3 - 
grandson of Joseph Bruen, private Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey 
Militia. 

CHARLES HALE TAYLOR, Chicago, III. (20277). Son of Charles and Mary 
(Parkhurst) Taylor; grandson of Amasa and Patty (Ewer) Taylor; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Low) Taylor; great--grandson of Samuel 
Taylor, private, Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt. 

HERBERT ITALLIDAY TAYLOR, Chicago, 111. (20880). Son of David and 
Hannah Ford (Halliday) Taylor; grandson of David and Margaret (Living- 
ston)' Taylor; great-grandson of Edward Chinn and .Martha (Nelson) Living- 
ston; great--grandson of James Livingston, Colonel First Canadian Regt. Con- 
tinental Army; great.--grandson of David Nelson, First Lieutenant Fourth 
Cumberland County IJallaliou Pcnna. Associalors and Militia. 

FREDERICK TELLER, Chicago, 111. (20285). Son of James Pierre and Ann 
Eliza Vibbard (Harris) Teller; grandson of Pierre and Catherine (Dawson) 
Teller; great-grandson of James Teller, Captain Third Westchester County 
Regt, New York Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS '235 

ARTHUR PATTON VAN SCIIAICK, Chicago, 111. (19794). Son of Anthony 
Gerard and Eden (Ludington) Van Schaick; grandson of Harrison and Fran- 
ces (White) Ludington; great-grandson of Frederick and Susannah (Griffith) 
Ludington; great-grandson of Hairy Ludington, Colonel Seventh Regt. Dutch- 
ess County New York Militia. 

PAUL LIVINGSTON WARREN, Chicago, 111. (20883), Son of Nathan TR and 
Minerva (Tousley) Warren; grandson of Cyrus and Nancy (Bacon) Warren; 
great-grandson of Nathan Warren, private, Weston Company Mass. Militia. 

JOHN WEARE, Lyon, France (111. 20276). Son of Charles A. and Lillie May 
(Compson) Weare; grandson of John A. and Martha (Parkhurst) Weave; 
great-grandson of John and Cynthia (Ashley) Weare; great--grandson of Peter 
Weare, private, Capt. John Gray's Company, Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Mass. 
Regt.; grandson of Thomas Wilbur and Martha Stevenson (Tripp) Compson; 
great-grandson of Edward and Phoebe (Crane) Compson; great 2 -granclsun of 
Thomas Compson (Cumson), private Eastern Battalion Morris County New 
Jersey Militia. 

DANIEL A. WILLIAMS, Antiocli, 111. (19799). Son of Daniel and Jane Elizabeth 
(Booth) Williams; grandson of Abel and Elizabeth (Beardslcy) Booth; great- 
grandson of James Booth, Captain Conn. Militia; great-grandson of Curtis 
Beardslcy, Corporal Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Abraham Beardslcy, pri- 
vate Conn. Militia. <• 

GEORGE NEWTON WRIGHT, Kankakee, 111. (20298). Son of San ford M. and 
Ella (Johnson) Wright; grandson of Newton Johnson; great-grandson of 
Horace and Sarah (Fuller) Johnson; great 2 -grandson of Noah (and Lucy 
Wilson) Fuller, private, Col. John Chandler's Regt. .Mass. Continental troops, 
pensioned; grcat a -grandson of Joint Wilson, private, Col. Seth Warner's Conn. 
Regt. 

ALFRED WHEELOCK YOUNG, Chicago, 111. (19792). Son of Henry Clay and 
Eliza Curtis (Woodward) Young; grandson of George Wheelock and Adelia 
(Blunt) Woodward; great-grandson of William II. and Eliza (Curtis) Wood- 
ward; grcaL 2 -grandson of Benjamin Curtis, Surgeon First Regt. New York 
Continental troops. 

INDIANA SOCIETY. 

ARTHUR SPENCER AYRES, Indianapolis, Ind. (20149). Son of Langdon and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Pease) Ayres; grandson of David and Dorcas (Ayres) 
Pease; great-grandson of David Pease, private Third Battalion Wadsworth's 
Conn. Brigade. 

FRANK LYLE BAIRD, Terre Haute, Ind. (20145). Son of Harvey L. and 
Anna (Kennedy) Baird; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Martin) Kennedy; 
great-grandson of James and Barbara A. (Sigafoos) Martin; great 2 -grandson 
of Benjamin and Margaret (Mann) Martin; great 3 -grandson of James Martin, 
Captain Second Bedford County Battalion Penna. Militia; great' J -grandson of 
Andrew Mann, Captain Eighth Regt. Penna. Continental Line. 

GEORGE WILLARD BENTON, Indianapolis, Ind. (-'0137). Son of Oliver 
Charles and Cora (Beach) Benton; grandson of Oliver and Elvira (Starr) 
Benton; great-grandson of Bethel Benton, private, Col. Woodbridge's and 
other Mass. Regts., pensioned. 

GARVIN MORRIS BROWN, Indianapolis, Ind. (20135). Son of William John 
and Cornelia (Garvin) Brown; grandson of Austin IT. and Margaret (Russell) 
Brown; great-grandson of William John and Susan (Tompkins) Brown; 
grcat 2 -grandson of George (and Hannah John) Brown, Sergeant First Virginia 
Slate Regt.; great ;1 -graudson of John John, private Penna. Continental Line. 

JOHN TEN BROOK CAMPBELL, La Kaycttc, Ind. (20147). Son of Joseph 
and Rachel (Tinbrook or Ten Brook) Campbell; grandson of Conrad and 
Elizabeth (Tate) Tinbrook; great-grandson of Jolm Ten Brook, Lieutenant 
Colonel New Jersey Militia. 



236 SONS OF TniC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

CAMPBELL H COBB, Indianapolis, Ind. (20133). Son of Edward A. and Sarah 
Frances (Hay) Cobb; grandson of Andrew P. and Sarah Stiles Fanny Bain- 
bridge (Gano) Hay; great-grandson of Isaac Eaton and Kezia (Bainbridgc) 
Gano; great 2 -grandson of John Gano, Chaplain Nineteenth Continental In- 
fantry. 

LAFAYETTE THOMAS COX, Napoleon, Ind. (194 19). Son of Francis and 
Amney (Hughs) Cox; grandson of Vardamon and Frances (Wells) Hughs; 
great-grandson of John Hughs, private Sixth Virginia Regt. 

MAJOR ALEXANDER DOWNING, Indianapolis, Inch (19415)- Son of Horace 
G. and Clara Downing; grandson of Michael A. and Susan (Lee) Downing; 
great-grandson of John and Perninia (Mundane) Downing; great 2 -grandson of 
Michael Downing, private Continental Army in Virginia. 

CHARLES REDWAY DRYER, Terre Haute, Ind. (1941 1). Son of Daniel and 
Fidelia (Perry) Dryer, Jr.; grandson of Daniel and Judith (Cobb) Dryer; 
great-grandson of John Dryer, First Lieutenant, Carpenter's Mass.. Regt. 

CHARLES ELMER ERVIN, Terre Haute, Ind. (19414). Son of John Riley and 
Sarah Ann (Finney) l\rvin; grandson of John Kell and Lourcna (Morgan) 
Finney; great-grandson of Charles Morgan, private, Captain Biggs's Company, 
Virginia Line. 

ISAAC BREEDING FLENNER, Terre Haute, Ind. (20143)- Son of Albert W. 
and Frances O'Kalla (Breeding) Flenner; grandson of Isaac and Rachael 
Anne (Hughes) Flenner; great-grandson of Joshua and Anna Provost (Le 
Sourd) Gillies Hughes; great 2 -grandsou of John (or Jean) Le Sourcl, premier 
pilote, French ship "L'Amphion." 

EDWARD GILBERT, Terre Haute, Ind. (20132). Son of Curtis and Alary Caro- 
line (King) Gilbert; grandson of Benjamin Gilbert, private, Col. Henry Sher- 
burn's Additional Conn. Continental Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

ELIJAH VICTOR GREEN, Martinsville, Ind. (20141). Son of John and Sarah 
(Victor) Green; grandson of Ranceburg and Ruth ("Morgan) Green; great- 
grandson of Thomas Green, Captain South. Carolina troops. 

DONALD ADAIR HALL, Portland, Ind. (19425). Son of George W. and Helen 
M. Hall; grandson of Amos and Elizabeth (McKinney) Hall; great-grandson 
of Joseph J. and Elizabeth McKinney; great--grandson of Anthony Wayne and 
Elizabeth (Bracken) McKinney; great 3 -grandson of Josepli McKinney, private 
Fifth Virginia Regt. of Foot. 

GEORGE W. HALL, Portland, Ind. (20126). Son of Amos and Elizabeth (Mc- 
Kinney) Hall; grandson of Joseph Jefferson and Elizabeth McKinney; great- 
grandson of Anthony Wayne and Elizabeth (Bracken) McKinney; great-- 
grandson of Joseph McKinney, private Fifth Virginia Regt. of Foot. 

WILLIAM PATTERSON HART, Huntington, Ind. (20139). Son of Robert and 
Emily (Hughs) Hart; grandson of William and Sarah (Ogden) Hughs; great- 
grandson of Ncri and Mary (Hasted) Ogden; great 2 -grandson of Jedediah 
Ogden, Captain New Jersey Light Infantry. 

GEORGE CLARENCE HECKMAN, Fort Wayne, Ind. (19413)- Son of William 
Cameron and Alice (Ilaima) Heckman; grandson of George C. and Anne 
Josephine (Davis) Heckman; great-grandson of John and Mary (Schneider) 
Heckman; great~-grandson of Peter and Susanna (Kachlein) Schneider; great 3 - 
grandson of John Peter Kachlein, Lieutenant-Colonel Northampton County 
Battalion Penna. troops. 

EVERETT MACEY HODGES, La Fayette, Ind. (20128). Son of Jonathan and 
Rhoda Ann (Ford) Hodges; grandson of Maccy ami Mclinda (Collins) Hodges; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Hodges, Sergeant, Colonel Daggett's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES JAMES HOVEY, Mount Vernon, Ind. (10117)- Son of Alvin Peter- 
son and Mary Ann (James) Hovey; grandson of Abicl and Frances (Peterson) 
Hovey; great-grandson of Samuel Hovey, Corporal, Colonel Douglas's Conn. 
Regt. 






REGISTER 01- NEW MEMBERS 237 

WILLIAM WAYLAND KENOWER, Huntington, Ind. (20138). Son of John 
and Sarah Purviance Kenower; grandson of James and Elizabeth Sprowl Pur- 
viancc; great-grandson of James Purviance, Captain North Carolina I, inc. 

HENRY WISNER KIMBALL, Indianapolis, Ind. (20130). Son of Lewis Allen 
and Mary (Bush) Kimball; grandson of Royal and Mary (Harvey) Kimball; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Kimball, private, Colonel Nixon's Regt. Mass. I,ine. 

W. TREVITTE VON KNAPPTC, Vincennes, Ind. (20127). Son of Horace Scott 
and Mary (Magee) von Knappe; grandson of Thomas and Jenctte (McBrcn- 
ton) Magee; great-grandson of James Magee, Captain and Paymaster, Colonel 
Graham's New York Regt; 

MARTIN DOUGLAS LANDERS, Coffeyville, Kan. (Ind. 19422). Son of Henry 
and Nancy .Ann (Sinks) Landers; grandson of William and Delilah (Stone) 
Landers; great-grandson of Nimrod II. Stone, private, Colonel Triplet's Vir- 
ginia Regt., pensioned. 

CLINTON DE VER.E LASHER, Indianapolis, Ind. (19421). Son of Andrew L. 
and Emma R. (Blystone) Lasher; grandson of Joseph and Mary M. (Peiffer) 
Blystone; great-grandson of Michael and Rebecca (Berlin) Peiffer; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac Berlin, private Butler's and Morgan's Penna. Regts. 

FRANCIS AUGUSTUS MacNUTT, Richmond, Ind. (201 31). Son of Joseph 
Gideon and Laetitia (Scott) MacNutt; grandson of John Murray Upham and 
Jane Campbell (Hawkins) MacNutt; great-grandson of Joseph Campbell and 
Isabella (rogue) Hawkins; grcat 2 -grandson of Samuel Hawkins, private Penna. 
Militia. 

SCOTT PATTERSON MacNUTT, Se'wickley, Pa. (Ind. 20134). Son of Albert 
Scott and Helen Marie (Patterson) MacNutt; grandson of Joseph Gideon and 
Laetitia Jane (Scott) MacNutt; great-grandson of John Murray Upham and 
Jane Campbell (Hawkins) MacNutt; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Campbell and 
Isabella (Pogue) Hawkins; great°-grandson of Samuel Hawkins, private Penna. 
Militia. 

CHARLES W. MERRILL, Indianapolis, Ind. (20140). Son of Samuel Merrdl; 
grandson of Samuel and Jane (Anderson) Merrill; great-grandson of Jesse and 
Priscilla (Kimball) Merrill; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Merrill, Captain of 
Haverhill Company Mass. Militia. 

DONALD ARCHIBALD MUIRHEAD, Fort Wayne, Ind. (194 12). Son of Alex- 
ander and Harriet (Woodworth) Muirhead; grandson of Benjamin and Dian- 
tha (Burritt) Stud-ley; great-grandson of Arad and Deborah (Studley) Wood- 
worth; grcat 2 -grandson of Benjamin Studley, First Lieutenant Plymouth County 
Mass. Militia. 

JOHN L. OTT, Indianapolis, Ind. (19423). Son of Louis W. and Anna (Walden) 
Ott; grandson of Elijah James and Margaret (McCowen) Walden; gr-.-at- 
grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Morrison) Walden; grcat 2 -grandson of Elijah 
Walden, private Virginia Continental Line. 

GEORGE PAULL TORRENCE SARGENT, Indianapolis, Ind. (16120). (Sup- 
plemental.) Son of Christopher Smith and Jane Findlay (Torrcnce) Sar- 
gent; grandson of Edward and Mary (Smith) Sargent; great-grandson of 
Thomas Frazer and Helena (Bartow) Sargent; gnat-grandson of Thomas and 
Sarah (Benczet) Bartow; grcat 3 -grandson of Daniel Deneset, member of First 
City Troop of Philadelphia, Penna. 

JAMES FINDLAY TORRENCE SARGENT, Indianapolis, Ind. (20150). Son of 
Christopher and Jane Findlay (Torrcnce) Sargent; grandson of James Find- 
lay and Ann Rebecca (Findlay) Torrcnce; great-grandson of George Paull 
and Mary Brownson (Findlay) Torrcnce; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Torrence, 
Lieutenant Seventh Regt, Penna. Line; gical'-'-giandsoii of John and Nancy 
(Brownson) Findlay; grcat 3 -grandson of Richard (and Mary McDowell) 
Brownson, Surgeon Sixth Battalion Cumberland County Penna. Assoeiators; 
great'-grandson of John McDowell, Captain Seventh Regt. Penna. Line and 



2 3 8 



Sons of The amkrican revolution 



Surgeon Sixth Regt. Penna. Line; great-grandson of Thomas and Ann Perry 
(Bell) Findlay, parents of Ann Rebecca Findlay; great 2 -grandson of Samuel 
Findlay, Quartermaster Sixth Battalion Cumberland County Penna. Associa- 
tors; grandson of Edward and Mary (Smith) Sargent; great-grandson of . 
Thomas Fraz.er and Helena (Bartow) Sargent; grcat--grandson of Thomas and 
Sarah (Benezet) Bartow; great ;! -grandson of Daniel Benezet, private First 
City Troop of Philadelphia, Penna. 

ROBERT JAMESON SCOVELL, Terre Haute, Ind, (20142). Son of Josiah 

Thomas and Joanna (Jameson) Scovell; grandson of Stephen Decatur and 
Caroline Miranda ("Parker) Scovell; great-grandson of Josiah Boardman and 
Anna (Saxe) Scovell; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Scovell, private, Col. Benja- 
min Bellows's Regt. New Hampshire Militia; great-grandson of Elijah and 
Rhody (Butler) Parker; great 2 -grandson of Elisha Parker, Major Fifth Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

BENJAMIN LAFAYETTE SPARKS. Eawrenceburg. Ind. (20130). Son of 
Thomas and Mary (Drake) Sparks; grandson of John and Sarah (Scott) 
Drake; great-grandson of William Scott, Jr., private First Virginia Slate 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of William Scott, private First Virginia State Regt. 

FREDFRIC IT. STERLING, Jr., Indianapolis, Ind. (20136). Son of Frederic 
Hamilton and Frances (Tdell) Sterling; grandson of Hamilton Brooks and 
Armenia E- Sterling; great-grandson of Daniel and Rachael (Brooks) Sterling; 

great 2 -grandson of Cornelius and CTTcnshaw) Brooks; great^-erandson of 

James Brooks, private, Capt. Giles Mead's Company, First Regt., New Jersey 
Continental Line. * 

CHARLES NORRIS STEVENSON, Indianapolis, Ind. (-0120). Son of William 
Nelson and Emma (Norn's) Stevenson; grandson of lames and Margaret 
(Campbell) Stevenson; great-grandson of Alexander Campbell, private Fifth, 

Eleventh, and Fifteenth Virginia Regts. of Foot. 

SAMUEL ARTHUR STEWART, Portland, Ind. (19418). Son of Samuel Porter 
and Deborah Jane (Dickson) Stewart; grandson of Thomas and Fliznbcth 
(Webb) Dickson; great-grandson of Jeremiah Webb, private Ninth. Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

JOSEPH EDWARD VAIT.E, Kokomo, Ind. (ro^o). Son of Rawson and Anne 
Eliza (Pope) Vaile; grandson of William and Eliza (Prince) Pope; great- 
grandson of Joseph and Anna (Hammond) Pope; greats-grandson of Benjamin 
Hammond, Lieutenant-Colonel Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Hczekiah and 
Isabella (Coombs) Prince; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Coombs, Sergeant, Mc- 
Cobb's Mass. Regt.; grcat' J -grandson of Kimball Prince, Captain Ma r s. troops, 
pensioned. 

CHAUNCEY RUNDLE WATSON, Jr., Indianapolis, Ind. (19416). Son of 
Chauncey R. and Fannie E. Watson; grandson of Flias and Caroline F. 
(Mcdbury) Watson; great-grandson of Elijah and Esther (Campbell) Watson; 
great 2 -grandson of Cyprian and Dorothy (Benton) Watson; great n grandson of 
Cyprian Watson, private, Colonel Van Vc'ghtcn's New York Regt. 

J. WESLEY WHICKER, Attica, Ind. (20144). Son of George P. and Juliet A. 
Whicker; grandson of Berry and Lillie Whicker; great-grandson of William 
Whicker or Whirl-car, Sergeant North Car.. Una Militia, pensioned. 

GEORGE W. WILSON, La Fayette, Ind. (20146). Son of John and Margaret 
(Cochran) Wilson; grandson of James and Agnes (McK.e) Wilson; great- 
grandson of William McKce, Captain Virginia Line, "bounty recipient." 

DAVID RUSS WOOD. Terre Haute, Ind. (20148). Son of Franc Ogilvy and 
Susanna Judge (Jewett) Wood; grandson of Thomas Liglitfoot and Ann 
(Haines) Jewett; ^real-grandson of John and Susanna (Judge) Jewett; preat 2 - 
grandson of Thaddeus and Anne (Webster) J< vett; grcat 3 -grandson of Cah 
Jewett, Captain of Sharon, Conn., Minute Men. 



REGISTER QP NEW M KM I'.I'.l'S 239 

IOWA SOCIETY. 

AIvPHEUS BENJAMIN 13EAEE, Sioux City, Iowa (19466). Son of Grafton 
Asbury and Martha Matilda (Dunlevy) Bcall; grandson of Alphus Benjamin 
and Mary Ann (Hill) Bcall; great-grandson of David and Mary (Davis) Beali; 
great 2 -grandsbn of Thomas Bcall, Kirst Lieutenant Second Mai viand Regt. 

GEORGE ANDREW BLAKE, Charles City, Iowa (19474). Son of Andrew and 
Charlotte (Cornell) Blake; grandson of Amos and Hannah S. (Aylesworrh) 
Cornell; great-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Corey) Aylcsworth; grcat--erand- 
son of Jeremiah Aylesivorth, private, Col. Charles Dyer's Regt. Rhode Island 
Militia. 

DRAYTON WIESON BUSITNEEE, Council Bluffs, Iowa (20630). Son of Kurnan 
J. and Eliza (McFarland) Bushnell; grandson of Alexander and Nancy (Hum- 
mcrson) Bushnell; great-grandson of William and Mary (Borden) Bushnell; 
great--grandson of Alexander Bushnell, Sergeant and Ensign Conn. Militia. 

FREDERICK W. CRAIG, Des Moines, Iowa (15082). (Supplemental.) Son of 
Joseph Starling and Dorcas Dunning (Wheeler) Craig; grandson of John and 
Charity (Einscott) Wheeler; great-grandson of Samuel Linscott, Corporal, Capt. 
George Rogers's Company,. Col. Nathaniel Jordan's Mass. Regt.; great--grandson 
of Andrew Dunning, Member Committee of Inspection and Correspondence, 
Harpswell, Maine; great-grandson of John Wheeler, Quartermaster, Capt. John 
Paul Jones's Continental ship "Ranger." 

CHARLES WILSON DOMBACK, Des Moines, Iowa (18472). Son of Charles 

Joseph and Gertrude Antoinette (Wilson) Domback; grandson of John and ■ 

(Frisbie) Wilson, Jr.; great-grandson of John Wilson, Captain, Col. Morris 
Graham's Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia. 

PAUL LE MOYNE DYSART, Keokuk, Iowa (19475). Son of Henry Martyn and 
Jane Olivia (Bruce) Dysart; grandson of Milton Hall and Harriet Clayton 
(Ewing) Dysart; great-grandson of Andrew and Jane (Ewing) Dysart; great-- 
grandson of John Dysart, Sergeant, Colonel McDowell's Regt. North Carolina 
Militia, pensioned. 

ERNEST EUGENE FAVILLE, Des Moines, Iowa (19473). Son of Miner Sher- 
wood and Sarah (Shaw) Faville; grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (West) 
Faville; great-grandson of John Faville, private, Capt. John Lofter's Company 
New York Continental troops. 

JUDSON HUDSON FUGARD, Newton, Iowa (20634). Son of John Flavel and 
Angalina Fugard; grandson of Samuel and Sally (Stone) Fugard; great- 
grandson of Samuel Fugard, private First New Hampshire Regt. Continental 
Line, pensioned. 

JOSEPH GREELEY GARDNER, Des Moines, Iowa (13876). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Christopher C. and Susan (Bartlctt) Gardner; grandson of Samuel W. 
and .Sophia (Greeley) Gardner; great-grandson of Joseph and Dorothy (Sargent) 
Greeley, Jr.; grcat--grandson of Christopher Sargent, private Mass. Militia at 
Lexington Alarm; great 3 -grandson of Robert Sargent, private Mass. Militia at 
Lexington Alarm; great'-' -grandson of Joseph Greeley, Sr., private, Col. Janus 
!\V<d\ and other New Hampshire Regis.; great-grandson of Samuel and Hannah 
(Walker) Gardner; greaf-'-grandson of Samuel Gardner, Sergeant, Col. Simeon 
Spaulding's and other Regis. Mass. Militia. 

SEWARD HIGBY, Cedar Falls, Iowa (19469). Son of Newton and Alice (Cole) 
Higby; grandson of Harvey IE and Mary (Schenck) Cole; great-grandson of 
Isaac and Ruth Ann (Knox) Schenck; great--grandson of John Schenck, Cap- 
tain Middlesex County Mew Jersey Militia. 

HENRY BENJAMIN IIOI.SMAN, Guthrie Center, Iowa (20632). Son of Wil- 
liam and Lucey (Dilley) Holsman; grandson of Robert and Hannah (Mc- 
Donald) Dilley; great-grandson of Bphraim Dilley, private Sussex County 
New Jersey Militia. 



. 
























24O SUNS OK THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

JOHN DI'IXEY HOLSMAN, Guthrie Center, Iowa (19463). Son of William and 
Lucy (Dilley) Ilolsman; grandson of Robert and Hannah (McDonald.) Dillcy; 
great-grandson of Ephriam Dillcy, private New Jersey Militia. 

JOSEPH ROY IIUBBART, Des Moines, Iowa (1 9461). Son of Joseph and Kate 
(De Golgcr) Ilubbart; grandson of Joseph Snow and Maria (Bonta) Hubbart; 
great-grandson of John Ilubbart, Lieutenant First Regt. Rhode Island Conti- 
nental Infantry. 

FRED HEATON HUNTER, Des Moines, Iowa (20626). Son of A. O. and Eliza 
(Iicaton) Hunter; grandson of Weaver and Rebecca (Sharp) Hcaton; great- 
grandson of Jacob Bowen and Rachel (Weaver) Iicaton; grcat 2 -grandson of 
Isaac (and Anna Bowen) Healon, Sergeant, Col. Robert Lewis's Battalion of 
Philadelphia, Penna., Flying Camp; great 3 -grandson of Henry Boiocn, Sergeant, 
Lient.-Col. Campbell's Company Ninth Virginia Regt. 

LINCOLN ROMAYNE HYPES, Council Bluffs, Iowa (19464). Son of Samuel 
Henry and Hannah (Van Brocklin) Hypes; grandson of Henry and Sarah N. 
(Wright) Hypes; great-grandson of George Wright, private Virginia Cavalry. 

LE BARON JAMES KASSON, Des Moines, Iowa (19471). Son of Tames Hatch 
and Alary S. (Robbins) Kasson; grandson of Joseph Milton and Hannah (Grey) 
Kasson; great-grandson of James Kasson, private, Capt. Bull's Company, Major 
Sheldon's Conn. Light Horse. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER LANE, Guthrie Center, Iowa (20629). Son of Edgar 
Cullcn and Eva A. Lane; grandson of William and Sally M. Lane; great grand- 
son of William and Fanny Lane; great"-grandson of Alexander Lane, private, 
Colonel Castine's and Colonel Willett's New Yoik Regts. 

ALFRED LONGLEY, Waterloo, Iowa (20633). Son of Charles Lawrence and 
Helen E- (Phillips) Longley; grandson of Alfred and Julia M. (Read) Long- 

iley; great-grandson of Thomas and Martha Anna (Taylor) Longley; great 2 - 
grandson of Edmund Longley, Captain Sixth Middlesex County Regt. Mass. 

Militia. 

1 

GEORGE AUGUSTUS LYON, Estherville, Iowa (20631). Son of Augustus 
Waldo and Harriett Bean (Prescott) Lyon; grandson of David B. and Lucy 
(Pierce) Prescott; great-grandson of John and Eunice (Dinsmore) Prescott; 
great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Prescott, private, Colonel Whitcomb's and Col. 
Josiah Whitney's Mass. Regts. 

THOMAS ARTHUR MERRILL, Mcdiapolis, Iowa (20627). Son of James Warren 
and Jessie (Telfcr) Merrill; grandson of Joshua and Rhoda (Crosson) Merrill; 
great-grandson of Samuel Crosson, private, Capt. Richard Brown's Company 
First Battalion Penna. Rifle Regt. 

CLINTON LAFAYETTE NOURSE, Des Moines, Iowa (10469). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Joseph Gabriel and Aclisah Sophronia (Abbott) Noursc; grandson of 
Charles and Susan Clinton (Cameron) Nourse; great-grandson of Daniel and 
Susan (Clinton) Cameron; great-grandson of Charles Clinton, Captain Mary- 
land Militia. 

ROBERT DODD PIPER, Chariton, Iowa (19468). Son of James and Elizabeth 
(Dodds) Piper; grandson of James and Catherine (Irvine) Piper; great-grand- 
son of Samuel Irvine, Lieutenant-Colonel Penna. Militia. 

JAMES HARRIS PATTERSON, Denison, Iowa (19470). Son of George W. and 
Sarah J. ('Cunningham) Patterson; grandson of John and Mary (Irvin) Pat- 
terson; great-grandson of James and Jean (Harris) Patterson; grcat 2 -grandson 
of John Harris, Sub-Lieutenant Cumberland County Penna. Militia, and Mem- 
ber of Committee of Observation. 

HENRY IIERNDON POLK, Des Moines, Iowa (20628). Son of Jefferson Scott 

and Julia (Ilcrndon) Polk; grandson of Jchosephat C. and Sally 1 

Polk; great-grandson of Ephraim Polk, private, Capt. James Rlioads's Company 

Philadelphia Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 24I 

CHARLES HERBERT SAYRE, Guthrie Center, Iowa (19465). Son of Albert 
Henry and Jennie (McCullough) Sayre; grandson of John J. and Isabella 
(Jack) McCullough; great-grandson of Matthew and Isabella M. (Porter) Jack; 
grcat--grandson of Matthew Jack, Captain Eighth Regt. Pcnna. Continental 
Eine. 

RAY WATERR.URY.SCOFIEED, Des Moines, Iowa (19460). Son of Proctor D. 
and Frances (Eoveland) Scofield; grandson of Ralph and Harriette (Kent) 
Eoveland; great-grandson of Dan and Mehitable (Goodrich) Kent; great-grand- 
son of Dan Kent, Sergeant Vermont troops, pensioned. 

HARRY SPENCER SNYDER, Sioux City, Iowa (19462). Son of Cyrus and Ella 
Martha (Johnson) Snyder; grandson of John Allen and Mary Eliza (Eddy) 
Johnson; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Allen) Johnson; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Allen, private, Warner's Vermont Regt.; grandson of 
George D. and Mary (Eindsey) Snyder; great-grandson of James and Rachel 
(Clawson) Eindsey; great 2 -grandson of David Eindsey, private Eighth Cumber- 
land County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ROBERT AEEEN WRIGHT, Carroll, Iowa (J9467). Son of Arthur Ece and 
Addis Ece (Hoover) Wright; grandson of David H. and Hannah B. (Pynchion) 
Wright; great-grandson of Bezalcel and Catherine (Kipp) Wright; great 2 - 
grandson of Bezalcel Wright, private Mass. Militia. 

KANSAS SOCIETY. 



FREDERICK GRANT BERGEN, Summerfield, Kans. (17967). Son of George I. 
and Maria (Field) Bergen; grandson of human and Abigail (De Eong) Field; 
great-grandson of Aaron and Sylvia (Bingham) De Eong; great 2 -grandson of 
Jeremiah Bingham, Sergeant at Battle of Bennington, Vt. ; great-grandson of 
Elislia Field, Jr., private, Colonel Herrick's Regt. Vt. Militia; great--grandson 
of Elisha Field, Sr., private, Colonel Walbridge's Battalion Vt. Volunteers; 
great 2 -grandson of Elias De Lo>ig, Eicutenant, Colonel Malcolm's Regt. New 
York Levies. 

CON MORRISON BUCK, Topeka, Kans. (17964). Son of Charles Addison and 
Emily Ann (Morrison) Buck; grandson of Charles Addison and Eunice 
(Stewart) Buck; great-grandson of Aholiab and Annis (Drake) Buck; great 3 - 
grandson of Elijah and Matilda (Foster) Buck; great 3 -grandson of William 
Buck, Member Westmoreland Penna. Committee of Correspondence. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON GREENWOOD, Topeka, Kans. (17962). Son of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth McGreenwood; grandson of Bartlee Grcemvood, private 
Virginia Continental Eine. 

GEORGE SHEPARD EINSCOTT, Ilolton, Kans. (17965). Son of Shcpard Keene 
and Josephine (Mallet) Einscott; grandson of Shepard and Esther (Kerne) 
Einscott; great-grandson of Samuel I^inscot, Corporal, Colonel Jordan's and 
other Mass. Regts. 

HOWARD NELSON MOSES, Salina, Kans. (17963). Son of Horace Wilson and 
Ellen Maria (Nelson) Moses; grandson of William and Adeline (Harmon) 
Moses; great-grandson of William and Anne (Milliken) Moses; great-grandson 
of George Moses, private Scarborough Company Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, Topeka, Kans. (17966). Son of Orin and Sarah T. 
Wilson; grandson of John and Betsy (Park) Wilson; great-grandson of Wil- 
liam Park, Quartermaster, Col. Ezra Woods's Mass. Regt. 

KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

EDWIN WILLARD BENTLEY, Louisville, Ky. (19680). Son of Jairus Jerome 
and Elizabeth Stewart (Beggs) Bentley; grandson of Arnold and Eydia 
(Northrup) Bentley; great-grandson of Nicholas Northrup, private Fourth 
Albany County Ret;:. New York Militia. 

16 



I 



242 SON'S OE 'I'll I'. AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

WILLIAM KELLOGG BOARDMAN, Louisville, Ky. (19681). Son of Daniel 
Webster and .Mary (Young) Boardman; grandson of William S. and Esther 
(Kilbournc) Young; ^eat-grandson of Harry and Mary (Mix) Kilbourne; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Ashbel Kilbournc, private, Colonel Webb's .Conn. Regt., 
pensioned. 

JOSEPH HEDGES EWALT, Paris, Ky. (19683). Son of Joseph Henry and 
Henrietta (Hedges) Ewalt; grandson of Samuel and Cynthia (Pugh) Ewalt; 
great-grandson of Henry (and Elizabeth Frye) Ezvalt, Ensign First Battalion 
Bedford County Penna. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Abraham Frye, private 
First Battalion Cumberland County Penna. Militia; great-grandson of Joseph 
Push, Lieutenant Fourteenth Regt. Virginia Continental Establishment; grand- 
son of Samuel and Rebecca Barbour (Moran) Hedges; great-grandson of Ed- 
ward Barbour and Letitia (Clay) Moran; grcat-'-grandson of Samuel Clay, pri- 
vate Virginia Infantry; great-grandson of Joseph Hedges, private, Col. Oliver 
Spencer's Regt. of Foot, Continental troops. 

SAMUEL JOSEPH I1ILLMAN, Louisville, Ky. (19677). Son of Samuel and 
Ellen, Hart (Gwathmey) Hillman; grandson of John and Ann McLnnan (Booth) 
Gwathmey; great-grandson of Owen Gwathmey, Sheriff King William County, 
Virginia. 

JESSE McCANDLESS, Louisville, Ky. (19682). Son of Andrew and Helen 
(Watkins) McCandless; grandson of Alexander and Malinda (McMahan) Mc- 
Candless; great-grandson of John McCandless, Dragoon, Capt. George Gray's 

troop, Fourth Continental Dragoons, pensioned. 

HOMER DEXTER POTTER, Louisville, Ky. (19678). Son of Thomas Candee 
and Arietta L. (Churchill) Potter; grandson of Lyman and Finette R. (Can- 
dee) Potter; great-grandson of Lake Potter, private, Hooker's Conn. Regt. 

LEWIS ROBERT WILLIAMS, Louisville, Ky. (19679). Son of David Ballingal 
and Martha D. (Blankenbaker) Williams; grandson of Lewis and Catherine 
(Ray) Blankenbaker; great-grandson of Nich.olas Blankenbaker, private Vir- 
ginia Line, pensioned. 

LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

EDGAR ROLLINS DU MONT, New Orleans, La. (17466). Son of Alphonse and 
Josephine (Bunker) du Mont; grandson of Robert Scafort and Eliza Ann 
(Stagg) Bunker; great-grandson of Jolin Stagg, Jr., Brigade Major, Conway's 
Brigade Continental troops. 

STEPHEN MILLER FOOTE, Jackson Barracks, La. (17469). Son of Henry 
William and Rebecca (Dunlap) Foote; grandson of Russel and Electa (Noble) 
Foote; great-grandson of Elijah Foote, private Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

THOMAS SLOO JOHNSON, New Orleans, La. (17471). Son of John Bridges 
and Maria Frances (Sloo) Johnson; grandson of Thomas and Maria Franees 
(Campbell) Sloo; great-grandson of Robert Blair and Mary Ann (Lee) Camp- 
bell; great-grandson of Ludwcll and Eliza (D'Armstadt) Lee; grcat 3 -grandson 
of Richard Henry J^ce, Signer of Declaration of Independence. 

EMMETT L. KIDD, Rnston, La. (17468). Son of M. B. and Fannie (Sholar) 
Kidd; grandson of John and Catherine (Miller) Sholar; great-grandson of 
Jesse Miller, private Georgia Line. 

JOSEPH HOBGOOD PULLEiV, Houma, La. (17467). Son of Benjamin King and 
Minerva Anncr (Smith) Pullen; grandson of Edward Warren and Harriet 
Cornelia (Fisher) Smith; great-grandson of William Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Virginia Continental Line. 

THOMAS SLOO, New Orleans, La. (17470). Son of Thomas and Maria Frances 
(Campbell) Sloo; grandson of Robert Blair and Mary Ann (Lee) Campbell; 
great-grandson of Ludwell and Eliza (D'Armstadt) Lee; grcat"-prandson of 
Richard Jlenry Lee, Signer of Declaration of Independence. 

WILLIAM ROBTNSON STRANGE, Gulfport, Miss. (La. 17472). Son of Thomas 
Grant and Mildred (Robinson) Strange; grandson of William M. and Mar- 



REGISTER 01? NEW MEMBERS 243 

garet F. (Johns) Robinson; great-grandson of Isaac Leavitt and Tirzah Gilman 
(Gordon) Robinson; great 2 -grandson of Josiah and Sussanah (Dow) Robinson; 
great-grandson of Levi Robinson, private, Col. Enoch Poor's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

ELMER ELLSWORTH WOOD, New Orleans, La. (17464). Son of Burris D. 
and Miriam Anna (Widney) Wood; grandson of Charles and Mary Alexander 
(Gilson) Widney; great-grandson of William and Phoebe (Alexander) Gilson; 
great 2 -grandson of Hugh Alexander, Jr., private Second Battalion Cumberland 
County Pcnna. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Hugh Alexander, Sr., Member First 
Assembly of Penna., 1776; great'-'-grandson of 'J Komas and Nancy (Boyd) 
Gilson; great 3 -grandson of William Gilson, private Maryland Militia; great 3 - 
grandson of David Boyd, private First Penna. Line; grandson of Jonathan 
and YVilhclmina C J ones; Wood; great-grandson of Abinah and Susannah (Hum- 
phreys) Wood; grcat*-grandson of Lewis Humphreys, private, Colonel Has- 
lett's Delaware Regt. 

YORK AMOS WOODWARD, New Orleans, La. (17465). Son of John Vandcr- 
bilt and Wealthy Ann (York) Woodward; grandson of Apollos and Jane (Van- 
derbilt) Woodward; great-grandson of William Woodward, private Sixth Bat- 
talion Conn, troops. 

MAINE SOCIETY. 

HARRY WALTON ADAMS, Vermejo Park, N. Mex. (Me. 20955). Son of Sam- 
uel and Hannah (Wilson) Adams, Jr.; grandson of Samuel Adams, private 
Eleventh Mass. Regt. 

MORTIMER ELMER ADAMS, Waterville, Me. (20106). Son of Silas and Re- 
becca E. (Skelton) Adams; grandson of John and lienrietta (Hatch) Adams; 
great-grandson of John and Hannah (Ridley) Adams; great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel Ridley, private Sixth Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES LORING ANDREWS, Augusta, Me. (20952). Son of ' George II. and 
Sarah (Safford) Andrews; grandson of Ichabod and Margaret (Fogg) An- 
drews; great-grandson of George and Lydia (Marr) Fogg; great 2 -grandson of 
Reuben Fogg, Colonel Third Cumberland County Mass. Regt. 

PHILIP GREELY BROWN, Portland, Me. (20179). Son of Philip Henry and 
Fanny (Clifford) Brown; grandson of Nathan and Hannah (Aver) Clifford; 
great-grandson of Nathan and Lydia (Simpson) Clifford; great 2 -grandson of 
David Simpson, Lieutenant New Hampshire troops; grandson of John Bundy 
and Ann Matilda (Greely) Brown; great-grandson of Philip and Dorcas (Blan- 
chard) Greely; great 2 -grandson of Eliphalet Greely, private (Maine) Mass. 
Militia; great : -grandson of Ozias Dlanchard, Lieutenant Cumberland County 
Mass. Militia. 

WILFRED CORE CHAPMAN, Portland, Me. (20198). Son of Gore B. and 
Julia A. (Stevens) Chapman; grandson of Ebenezer Collins and Eunice Ste- 
vens; great-grandson of Jonathan and Tabitha (Tobey) Stevens; great-grand- 
son of Joshua Stevens, Second Lieutenant, Capt. William Cobb's Mass. Com- 
pany. 

HENRY J. CHURCH, Portland, Me. (20199). Son of Moses P. and Mary Jane 
(Lombard) Church; grandson of Harry and Tabitha Lombard; great-grandson 
of Ebenezer and Jennie (Freeman) Lombard; great 2 -grandson of Richard and 
Lydia Lombard; great 2 -grandson of Solomon Lombard, Chairman Committee 
of Safety, Gorham, Maine. 

HAROLD LESTER COLBETII, Machiasport, Me. (20183). Son of Joel W. and 
Sarah (Flynn) Colbcth; grandson of Hiram Marston and Phoebe (Tupper) 
Flynn; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Marston) Flynn; great-grandson 
of Samuel Marston, private, Capt. Henry Ellis's Company, Col. Enoch Poor's 
New Hampshire Regt., pensioned; great-grandson of Gideon O'B. and Betsey 
(Shoppc) Tupper; greats-grandson of Anthony Shoppc, private, Col. John 
Brooks's Seventh Mass. Regt., pensioned; grandson of John and Abagail 






244 SONS OF the American revolution 

(Libby) Colbeth; great-grandson of Luther C. and Mary (McCalab) Libby; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Josiah Libby, private, Capt. John Allen's artillery company 
at Machias, Maine. 

GEORGE CARMAN DEAKE, New York, N. Y. (Me. 20953). Son of Charles 
Standish ami Emma Amelia (Carman) Dcake; grandson of Charles and Olive 
York (Sturdivant) Deake; great-grandson of Benjamin and Abigail (Standish) 
Dcake; great-'-grandson of George Dcake, Member Corrm/ittce of Correspond- 
ence of Cape Elizabeth, Mass., and Lieutenant Mass. Militia. 

ARTHUR EUGENE DODGE, Newcastle, Me. (20185).. Son of Benjamin and 
Mary Ava (Wilson) Dodge; grandson of Samuel and Eliza (Dodge) Wilson; 
great-grandson of Washington and Nancy (Perkins) Dodge; great--grandson 
of Paul Dodge, Captain First Company, Third Lincoln County Regt. Mass. 
Militia, pensioned. 

GEORGE WILLIAM DRUMMOND, Savannah, Ga. (Me. 20190). Son of Edward 
William and Mary Ann (Dixon) Drummond; grandson of William Edward 
ami Sarah (Burnham) Drummond; great-grandson of John and Damaris (Hay- 
den) Drummond; grcat--grandson of Josiah Hoyden, Major Twenty-third Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

HARRY HOWARD DUNBAR, Winslow, Me. (10189). Son of -Ambrose Howard 
and Susan A. (Crommett) Dunbar; grandson of Franklin and Lydia (Howard) 
Dunbar; great-grandson of Ambrose and Ruth (Barker) Howard; great' i - 
grandson of Daniel Howard, private, Colonel Cary's Mass. Regt.; grandson of 
James Alfred and Augusta (Simpson) Crommett; great-grandson of Tufton 
and Susan (Reynolds) Simpson; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin (and Sarah 
Shattuck) Simpson, private, Captain Haskell's Company Mass. Militia; grcat 3 - 
grandson of Job Shattuck, Captain Sixth Mass. Militia. 

HARRY CHARLES FOLSOM, Oakland, Me. (18775). Son of Charles W. and 
Laura A. (Hallett) Folsom; grandson of Jonathan and Abigail K. (Lord) Fol- 
sorri; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Knowlton) Lord; greats-grandson 
of James Lord, Lieutenant, Poor's Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Jonathan 
and Sarah (Hussey) Hallett; great-grandson of Elisha Jlallctt, seaman on 
Mass. sloop ''Republic," prisoner. 

NORMAN K. FULLER, Waterville, Me. (20186). Son of Albert and Mary 
(Keith) Fuller; grandson of Enoch and Harriet Fuller, Jr.; great-grandson of 
Enoch Fuller, private Lincoln County Mass. Militia; grandson of Richard and 

Jane (Hiscock) Keith; great-grandson of and Mary (Drummond) His- 

cock; great 2 -grandson of John and Damaris (Haydcn) Drummond; grcat 3 - 
grandson of Josiah Haydcn, Major Twenty-third Regt. Mass. Militia. 

PASCAL PEARL GILMORE, Bucksport, Me. (20177). Son of Tyrrel and Mary 
Wood (Pearc) Gilmore; grandson of David and Sally (Coombs) Gilmore; 
great-grandson of Samuel Gilmore, Cilmor, private Mass. troops. 

ENOCH OWEN GREENLEAP, Farmington, Me. (20178). Son of Enoch Lin- 
coln and Rcbekah W. Greenleaf; grandson of Stephen and Fanny Greenleaf; 
great-grandson of John Greenleaf, private, Colonel McCobb's Mass. Regt. 

LINCOLN O. HANSCOM, Waterville, Me. (20193)- Son of Watts B. and Sarah 
P. (Robinson) Hanscom; grandson of Otis P. and Lydia (Bowker) Ilanscom; 
great-grandson of Levi Bowker, private Third and Tenth Mass. Rcgts., widow 
pensioned; great-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (I'hincs) Hanscom; grcat 2 - 
grandson of Aaron Hanscom, private Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE WALTER HESELTON, Gardiner, Me. (20187). Son of Reuben and 
Sarah Greenlief (Tarbox) Heselton; grandson of Reuben and Hannah (Gil- 
man) Heselton; great-grandson of Joseph Hazelton (Heselton), private Second 
Company, Col. Joseph Cillcy's New Hampshire Regt. 

JAMES FREDERICK IHEL, Waterville, Me. (2019.,). Son of James P. and Erne- 
line P. (Simpson) Hill; grandson of Ezekiel and Roxanna Simpson; g eal 
grandson of Denjaynin (and .Sarah Shattuck) Simpson, private, Captain Has- 



REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS 245 

kell's Company Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Job Shattuck, Captain Sixth 
Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Purmont Hill; great-grandson of Jonathan 
Hilt, private Fourth New Hampshire Regt. 
VIRGIL DEEPHINO HILTON, North Anson, Mc. (20184). Son of Joel and 
Lucy K. (Mitchell) Hilton; grandson of William and Martha (Hilton) Hil- 
t in; great-grandson of William Hilton, father of Martha, private, Col. Michael 
Jackson's Regt. Mass. Line, pensioned; grandson of William and Betsey 
(Everett) Mitchell; great-grandson of Moses Mitchell (Tzvitchell) , Jr., private, 
Colonel Phinney's and other Mass. Regts; great-grandson of Moses Tzvitchell, 
private, Capt. Samuel Noyes's Company, Colonel Phinney's Mass. Regt.; great- 
grandson of John Hilton, father of William, Second Lieutenant, Col. Samuel 
McCobb's Lincoln County Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Josiah Everett, Jr., 
private, Colonel Brewer's and other Mass. Regts., pensioned. 
HARRY IRVIN HIX, Rockland, Me. (20954)- Son of Henry Franklin and 
Emily (Hall) Hix; grandson of Ezekiel and Elizabeth (Gray) Hall; great- 
grandson of Lewis and Anna (Dyer) Hall; great-grandson of Isaac Hall, 
First Lieutenant, Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 
GUY ANDREW HUBBARD, Oakland, Me. (20176). Son of George Washington 
and Mary Elizabeth (Bailey) Hubbard; grandson of Stephen and Hannah 
(Mitchell) Bailey; great-grandson of Humphrey and Meribah (Davis) Bailey; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Susanna (Palmer) Bailey, Jr.; great 3 -grandson 
of Thomas Bailey, prisoner on prison-ship "Jersey"; grandson of Guy Tamo 
Pate Underwood rind Martha (Hubbard) Hubbard; great-grandson of Philip 
Hubbard, father of G. T. P. U. Hubbard, private, Colonel Scammon's Mass. 
Regt.; great-grandson of Jonathan and Frances (Parsons) Hubbard, parents of 
Martha Hubbard; great-grandson of Philip Hubbard, Captain, Colonel Scam- 
mon's Mass. Regt. 
WILLISTO.N JENNINGS, North Wayne, Me. (18764). (Supplemental.) Son of 
Samuel Morton and Maty (Lobdell) Jennings; grandson of Isaac and Char- 
lotte (Pratt) Eobdell, Jr.; great-grandson of Isaac Lobdell, Sergeant, Colonel 
Burns's Mass. Regt. 
EMBERT LAURENCE JONES, Gorham, Me. (20182). Son of George W. and 
Clarissa (Jennings) Jones; grandson of Lemuel C. and Nancy (French) Jones; 
great-grandson of Elisha and Keziah (Cbnant) Jones; great 2 -grandson of 
Anthony Jones, private, Col. Jonathan Ward's Mass. Regt. 
LEON S. MERRILL, Solon, Me. (20101)- Son of Stephen and Jerusha (Dean) 
Merrill; grandson of Ebenczcr Dean, private, Colonel Jackson's Regt. Mass. 
Line, pensioned; grandson of Benjamin and Rachel (Durrell) Merrill; great- 
grandson of Ezra and Molly (Stevens) Merrill; great-grandson of Stephen 
Merrill, Captain, Col. Caleb Cushing's Regt. Mass. Militia. 
JAMES LOREN MERRICK, Waterville, Me. (20200). Son of Hall Clement and 
Hannah Rowe (Work) Merrick; grandson of James and Hannah (Rowe) 
Work, Jr.; great-grandson of James Work, Corporal, Col. John Nixon's Fifth 
Mass. Regt. 
FRANK BARBOUR MILLIKEN, Portland, Me. (20105). Son of George and 
Henrietta (Barbour) Milliken; grandson of John and Kathcrinc (Goold) Bar- 
bour; great-grandson of Joseph and Abigail (Henshaw) Goold; great-grandson 
of Joseph Goold, private, Capt. Samuel Leighton's Company, Colonel Francis's 
Regt. Mass. Militia, pensioned; great-grandson of Robert and Jane (Robinson) 
Barbour; great-grandson of Joshua and Hannah (Stone) Robinson; great 3 - 
grandson of John and Jane (Stone) Lord; great 4 -grandson of Tobias Lord, 
- Captain Mass. Infantry, Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Battalion. 
STEPHEN COLLINS MORRISON, Brunswick, Mc (20181). Sou of Moses 

Morrison, private, Col. Henry Sherburne's Continental Regt., pensioned. 
FREDERICK AUGUSTUS MOTLEY, Portland, Me. (20180). Son of Nathaniel 
and Rachel (Horton) Motley; grandson of Rufus Norton, Sergeant Mass. 
Militia, Lexington Alarm. 



246 



SONS OF ' l v 1 1 J v AMI\IUCAN REVOLUTION 



FRED G. PAINE), Farmington, Me. (18773). Son of Simeon Cragin and Caroline 
Augusta (Handy) Paine; grandson of josiah and Lavinia (Bryant) Paine; 
great-grandson of Micah and Alary (Twitchcll) Bryant; great 8 -grandson of 
Moses Twitchcll, private Mass. Continental troops; greats-grandson of Moses 
Twitchcll, private Mass. Continental troops; great 2 - grandson of Micah Bryant, 
private Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Josiah Parker and Sarah (Cragin) 
Paine; great-grandson of William Paine, Payne, private Mass. troops. 

JARVIS CROCKETT PERRY, Rockland, Me. (20951). Son of John Jarvis and 
Mary F. (Cowl) Perry; grandson of Ephraim and Nancy (Crockett) Perry; 
great-grandson of John Perry, Commander of privateer boat "Fly" and Cap- 
tain, Col. Samuel McCobb's Mass. Regt. 

MOSES HENRY SAMPSON, Portland, Me. (20197). Son of Charles Harris and 
Mary Drummond (Riggs) Sampson; grandson of Henry and Hannah M. 
(Philbrook) Sampson; great-grandson of James Sampson, private, Capt. Jordan 
Parker's Company Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD LESLIE SIMPSON, Waterville, Me. (20192). Son of Fred Leslie and 
Henrietta Mabel (Getchell) Simpson; grandson of Lucias Allen and Susan 
(Hunter) Simpson; great-grandson of Tufton and Susan (Reynolds) Simpson; 
great--grandson of Benjamin (and Sarah Shattuck) Simpson, private, Captain 
Haskell's Company Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Job Shattuck, Captain 
Sixth Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE MYRON STONE, Waterville, Me. (201 SS). Son of William and De- 
borah McC. (Hanscom) Stone; grandson of Otis Pineo and Lydia (Bowker) 
Hanscom; great-grandson of Levi Botcher, private, Col. Benjamin Tupper's 
Mass. Continental Regt. 

WALTER HENRY STURTEVANT, Richmond, Me. (6305). (Supplemental.) 
Son of William Henry and Eleanor Clarke Tallman (Smith) Sturtevant; 
grandson of Jonathan and Ruth (Leonard) Sturtevant; great-grandson of 
Joseph Sturtevant, Sergeant, Capt. Noah Fearing's Company Mass. Militia; 
grandson of Horatio and Eliza Sophia (Tallman) Smith; great-grandson of 
Ebenezer and Jennet (McKown) Smith; grcat-'-grandson of Patrick McKown, 
Member of Boothbay Committee of Inspection and Safety. 

EUGENE HALE THURLOW, Stonington, Me. (18774). Son of Wilmot Belyea 
and Phebe Ellen (Barbour) Thurlow; grandson of Paul and Charlotte (Small) 
Thurlow; great-grandson of David and Mercy (Trundy) Thurlow; great 2 - 
grandson of Abram Thurlow (Thorla or Thurlo), private Mass. Militia. 



MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

HOWARD ELMER ASHBURY, Baltimore, Md. (20092). Son of Joseph Martin 
and Emma Bartlett (Elmer) Ashbury; grandson of Lewis and Mary Ann (Mc- 
Kersham) Elmer; great-grandson of Horace and Susan (Stewart) Elmer; 
great-grandson of William and Mary (Allison) Elmer; great 3 -grandson of 
William Allison, Colonel Third Orange County Regt. New York Militia, 
Brigadier-General, Member of New York Provincial Congress. 

WILLIAM ORIGEN ATWOOD, Baltimore, Md. (20926). Son of William and 
Annie Browne (Hammond) Atwood; grandson of Nathan Browne and Mary 
Ann (King) Hammond; great-grandson of Nathan and (Browne) Ham- 
mond; great 2 -grandson of Nathan Broivne, Lieutenant Twentieth Battalion 
Maryland Militia. 

GEORGE RAYMOND BABYLON, Baltimore, Md. (20547). Son of Mordecai 
Weaver and Sarah E. (Stoner) Babylon; grandson of George W. and Mary C. 
Stoner; great-grandson of George and Anna (Hummel) Stoner; grcat-'-grand- 
son of Augustus and Sarah (Withington) Stoner; grcat 3 -grandson of Peter 
Withington, Captain Twelfth Penna. Regt. 

CHARLES NEWTON BOULDEN, Baltimore, Md. (20549). Son of \V 

James and Martha Ellen (Cath-cll) Boulden; grandson of Levi and Pri cilia 
(Cannon) Cath-ell; great-grandson of Levi Cath-cll, private Third Maryland 
Independent Company. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 247 

JOSEPH ROBSON BROMWELL BRANCH, Ellicott City, Md. (20935). Son of 
Henry and Melissa M. (Jarvis) Branch; grandson of David Mann and Sarah 
Ellen (Harris) Branch; great-grandson of Matthew and Rehecca (Bell) 
Branch; great-grandson of Henry Bell, Lieutenant Third Continental Dra- 
goons; grandson of Nathan and Ellen (Chinn) Jarvis; great-grandson of 
Francis and Millicent (Hosmer) Jarvis; great'-'-grandson of Nathan and Beulah 
(Hosmer) Hosmer; grcat 3 -grandson of Stephen Hosmer, First Lieutenant Mass. 
Light Infantry. 

SAMUEL ELMER BROWN, Frederic!:, Md. (20527). Son of Samuel II. and 
Sarah Jane (Horner) Brown; grandson of James and Sarah (Hays) Brown; 
great-grandson of James Hays, First Lieutenant Second Northumberland County 
Battalion I'enna. Militia. 

HENRY DEMING BULKLEY, Baltimore, Md. (2053S). Son of Erastus and 
Mary (Walbridge) Bulkley; grandson of Charles and Eunice (Robbins) Bulk- 

Iley; great-grandson of Cltarlcs Bulkley, private, Capt. James Watson's Conn. 
Company. 
JOHN MURRAY BUSH, Hampstead, Md. (19045)- Son of Daniel and Margaret 
(Annacost) Bush; grandson of Stoffel and Belinda (Murray) Annacost; great- 
grandson of John Murray, Captain Baltimore County Maryland Militia. 
BENNETT FRANCIS BUSSEY, Texas, Md. (20546). Son of Clement C. and 
Mary Ridely (Cockey) Bussey; grandson of Henry Green and Susanna (Har- 
ris) Bussey; great-grandson of Bennett Bussey, Captain Harford County 
Maryland Militia. 
JAMES WHITE CLAYTON, Baltimore, Md. (20089). Son of John Polk and 
Mary A. (Johnson) Clayton; grandson of John L. and Ellen M. (Clark) Clay- 
ton; great-grandson of James Lawson and Elizabeth (Polk) Clayton; great 2 - 
grandson of Joshua Clayton, Colonel Bohemia Battalion of Maryland. 

PARKER COOK, Baltimore, Md. <20o8i). Son of Henry F. and Catharine E- 
Cook; grandson of Isaac P. and Hannah Cook; great-grandson of Archibald 
Cook, private Maryland State troops, pensioned. 

ALBION JAMES CORNING, Roland Park, Md. (20930). Son of Albion James 
and Margaret Sheppard (Woodside) Corning; grandson of Gilman and Lu- 
cinda (Dow) Corning; great-grandson of John and Lydia (Richardson) Corn- 
ing; great 2 -grandson of William Richardson, private, Maj. Samuel Bodwell's 
Mass. Company. 

CHARLES FRANCIS CORNING, Roland Park, Md. (20931). Son of Albion 
James and Margaret Sheppard (Woodside) Corning; grandson of Gilman and 
Lucinda (Dow) Corning; great-grandson of John and Lydia (Richardson) 
Corning; great-grandson of William Richardson, private, Maj. Samuel Bod- 
well's Mass. Company. 

WILLIAM KENNEDY CROMWELL, Lake Roland, Md. (20540). Son of Rich- 
ard and Mary Josephine (Kennedy) Cromwell; grandson of Richard and Eliza- 
beth Ann (Hammond) Cromwell; great-grandson of Denton and Sallie Hall 
(Baldwin) Hammond; great-grandson of Henry Baldwin, Lieutenant Third 
Regt. Maryland Line. 

HARRY GOUGH DALLAM, Baltimore, Md. (20536). Son of Joseph Worthing- 
ton and Octavia A. (Gough) Dallam; grandson of Richard and Sally (Walks) 
Dallam; great-grandson of John Dallam, private Harford County [Maryland 
Militia; great 2 -grandson of Richard Dallam, Member Committee of Safety, 
Harford County, Maryland. 

RICHARD DALLAM, Pel Air, Md. (-0933)- Son of William II. and Mary C. 
Dallam; grandson of Richard and Sallie (Walks') Dallam; great-grandson of 
John Dallam, private Harford County Maryland Militia; great-grandson of 
Richard Dallam, Member of Harford County Committee of Safety. 

JAMES LAMBERT DASHIELL, Wilmington, Del. (Md. 20090). Son oi Oliver 
Hazafd Perry and Ann Elizabeth (Smith) Dashiell; grandson of Lambert 






. 















248 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Hyland and Eliza Jane (Hughes) Dashicll; great-grandson of Arthur and 
Esther (Wailes) Dashicll, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of Arthur Dashicll, First Lieu- 
tenant Maryland troops. 
JOHN WALBACH EDELEN, Baltimore, Md. (17245). (Supplemental.). Son of 
Benjamin M. and Mary Thcrese (Gardiner) Edelen; grandson of George and 
Sarah I. (Jamison) Edelen; great-grandson of Edzvard Edelen, Sergeant, Col. 
William Smallwood's Battalion of Charles County Maryland troops. 

THOMAS IRELAND ELLIOTT, Baltimore, Md. (19050). Son of William and 
Rosannah (Bunting) Elliott; grandson of John and Mary (Somerville) Bunt- 
ing; great-grandson of William Bunting, Ensign Maryland Flying Camp. 

CHARLES WRIGHT ELY, Frederick, Md. (20091). Son of Flias Sanford and 
Hester Maria (Wright) Ely, grandson of Simeon Lay and Elizabeth (Sanford) 
Ely; great-grandson of Robert Ely, Lieutenant, First Company, Seventh Regt. 
Conn. Militia; grandson of Jedediah Chapman and Sylvia (Lay) Wright; great- 
grandson of Simeon Lay, Captain, Tenth Company, Seventh Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HARVEY EWING, Bel Air, Md. (20535)- Son of George E. N. and Sallie (Dal- 
lam) Ewing; grandson of John S. and Amanda M. Dallam; great-grandson of 
Richard and Sallie (Wallis) Dallam; great 2 -grandson of John Dallam, private 
Harford County Maryland Militia; great 3 -grandson of Richard Dallcm, Mem- 
ber Committee of Safety, Harford County, Maryland. 

WILLIAM HENRY FORSYTH, Jr., F.llicott City, Md. (2007S). Son of William 
Henry and Arabella Crawford (Welling) Forsyth; grandson of William and 
Mary (Crawford) Welling; great-grandson of William and Katherine (Win- 
chester) Welling; great--grandson of William Winchester, Captain, Limv.nore 
Battalion Maryland troops. 

CHARLES DORSEY GAITIIER, Stockwood, Md. (20920). Son of George Riggs 
and Rebecca (Dorscy) Gaithcr; grandson of Charles J. W. and Mary (Ridgely) 
Dorsey; great-grandson of John Worthington Dorscy, Captain Elkridge Com- 
pany Maryland Militia. 

THOMAS HENRY GAITIILR, Jr., Baltimore, Md. (20097). Son of Thomas H. 
and Sophia B. Gaithcr; grandson of George Riggs and Hannah (Bradley) 
Gaither; great-grandson of Abraham and Hannah (Smith) Bradley; great-- 
grandson of Abraham Bradley, Captain Connecticut Militia; great-grandson of 
Daniel and Henrietta (Riggs) Gaither; grcat-'-grandson of Samuel Riggs, Lieu- 
tenant Maryland Militia. 

ARISTIDES SMITH GOLDSBOROUGH, Baltimore, Md. (20927). Son of Rob- 
ert and Araminta Sidney (Winder) Goldsborough ; grandson of Robert and 
Eleanor Dall (Lux) Goldsborough; great-grandson of Darby Lux, Colonel 
"Marching Militia" from Baltimore County, Maryland; grandson of William 
Sydney and Arnminta (Bayly) Winder; great-grandson of Levin Winder, 
Lieutenant Colonel Fourth Maryland Regt. 

CHARLES SYLVESTER GRINDALL, Baltimore, Md. (20098). Son of John 
Thomas and Eliza (Armstrong) Grindall; grandson of John Gibson and Fllen 
(Wheeler) Grindall; great-grandson of Thomas II ]V heeler, private, Capt. John 
Love's Company of Harford County, Maryland. 

JOHN HANDY HALL, Philadelphia, Pa. (Md. 20534). Son of William T. and 
Ellen (Handy) Hall; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Coxe) Handy; great- 
grandson of George Handy, Captain in Lee's Legion Virginia Cavalry. 

CHARLKS CHURCH HARRIS. Baltimore, Md. '(20545). Son of James lb, well 
and Eliza Jane (Roscnbcrgcr) Harris; grand on ol Sanson and Sophia (Ram- 
say) Harris; great-grandson of William and Margaret (Woods) Ramsay; 
great 2 -grandson of William Ramsay, private Virginia Continental Line; grcafr 
grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Turk) Harris; n I'-'-grandsou of Thomas 
and Ann (Bearer) Turk; greats-grandson of Thomas Turk, private, * apt. 
Thomas Rankin's Company Virginia Militia. 



isiy.is'iT.K oi'" new members 249 

DRAYTON MEADE HITE, Baltimore, Md. (20550). Son of James Madison and 
Harriet (Meade) Hite; grandson of James Madison and Caroline (Rose) Hite; 
great-grandson of Isaac Hite, Major Eighth Virginia Regt. 

CHARGES TAYLOR JENKINS, Baltimore, Md. (20928). Son" of George Taylor 
and Elizabeth Hand (Barroll) Jenkins; grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Taylor) Jenkins; great-grandson of Charles Taylor, Surgeon's Mate Second 
Virginia Regt., Surgeon Virginia Convention Guards. 

ARTHUR LAFAYETTE JONES, Baltimore, Md. (20099). Son of Edward and 
Maria Fayetta (Croxall) Jones; grandson of Thomas and Mary (Long) Croxall; 
great-grandson of Charles Croxall, Captain, Col. Thomas Hartley's Penna. Regt., 
prisoner, pensioned. 

EDGAR GODMAN JONES, Baltimore, Md. (20083). Son of Oliver Brown and 
Mary Jane (Godman) Jones; grandson of Thomas Wood and Mary (Baldwin) 
Godman; great-grandson of Brutus and Margaret (Wood) Godman; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Godman, Captain Fourth Battalion Maryland troops. 

ROBERT BEAUREGARD JONES, Baltimore, Md. (20082). Son of Oliver Brown 
and Mary Jane (Godrnan) Jones; grandson of Thomas Wood and Mary (Bald- 
win) Godman; great-grandson of Brutus and Margaret (Wood) Godman; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Godman, Captain Fourth Battalion Maryland troops. 

ROBERT MAURICE LEVERING, Baltimore, Md. (20543). Son of Maurice 
Maulsby and Mary Ann (Russell) Fevering; grandson of Charles and Hester 
Fevering; great-grandson of Aaron Levering, Captain Flying Camp, Philadel- 
phia County, Penna. 

JOHN MILTON FY ELF, Baltimore, Md. (20548). Son of John Middleton and 
Anna Doswell (Booker) Fyell; grandson of Erasmus D. and Olivia C. (Ander- 
son) Booker; great-grandson of James and Ann (Throckmorton) Booker; 
great 2 -grandson of Lewis Booker, Lieutenant, Colonel Harrison's Regt. of 
Virginia Artillery. 

EUGENE- B. McDONAFD, Fort Howard, Md. (20079). Son of John and Florence 
V. (Brunalc) McDonald; grandson of James A. and Mary (Walton) McDonald; 
great-grandson of James McDonald, private, Col. Joseph Crockett's and Col. 
George Rogers Clark's Regts. 

WIFFIAM E. MAGRUDER, Baltimore, Md. (20531). Son of William Edward 
and Margaret (Brooks) Magruder; grandson of William Bowie and Mary (Ham- 
mond) Magruder; great-grandson of Zadock and Martha (Wilson) Magruder, 
Jr.; great 2 -grandson of Zadock Magruder, Colonel Maryland Militia and Mem- 
ber of Council of Safety. 

FRANK ZACH ARIAS MILLER, Westminster, Md. (10046). Son of Andrew 
Milton and Martha Ann (Huntington) Miller; grandson of Orcn and Thank- 
ful "Mary Anne (Page) Huntington; great-grandson of Azel and Hannah 
(Robinson) Huntington; great-grandson of Andrew Huntington, Lieutenant, 
Hosford's Conn. Regt. 

FREDERICK DANIEL MILLER, Westminster, Md. (19047). Son of Andrew 
Milton and Martha Ann (Huntington) Miller; grandson of Orcn and Thankful 
Mary Anne (Page) Huntington; great-grandson of Azel and Hannah (Robin- 
son) Huntington; great-grandson of Andrew Huntington, Lieutenant, Hos- 
ford's Conn. Regt. 

RICHARD ORLN MILLER, Chicago, 111. (Md. 20080). Son of Andrew Milton 
and Martha Ann (Huntington) Miller; grandson of Oren and Thankful Mary 
Anne (Page) Huntington; great-grandson of Azel and Hannah (Robinson) 
Huntington; grea.t 2 -grandson of Andrew Huntington, Lieutenant, Hosford's 
Conn. Regt. 

FRANK L. MOIILER, Catonsville, Md. (205.14). Son of Isaac W. and Julia V. 
Mohler; grandson of Peter and Anna Barbara (Lutz) Moliler; great-grandson 
of Casper Lute, private Penna. troops. 






250 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



GERARD EMORY MORGAN, Baltimore, Md. (20541). Son of Joseph Asbury 
and Catharine (Emory) Morgan; grandson of Gerard and Rosannah (Brown) 
Morgan; great-grandson of John Brown, Captain, Colonel Matthews's Regt. 
Virginia Militia. 

EDWARD OLIVER MURRAY, Baltimore, Md. (20088). Son of John Oliver and 
Laura A. Murray; grandson of John Wesley and Kcziah (Cox) Murray; great- 
grandson of John and Sarah (Beasman) Murray; great-grandson of John 
Murray, Captain Baltimore County Md. Militia. 

FRANKLIN BUCHANAN OWEN, Baltimore, Md. (20093). Son of William 
Tilghman and Mary (Buchanan) Owen; grandson of Franklin and Anne 
(Lloyd) Buchanan; great-grandson of George and I.aetitia (McKean) Buchanan; 
great-grandson of Thomas McKean, Signer of Declaration of Independence, 
Colonel Fourth Battalion Penna. Associators. 

FRANCIS NEAR PARKE, Westminster, Md. (200S7). Son of George Motter and 
Mary White (Ncal) Parke; grandson of Joseph Maxwell and Amanda (Motter) 
Parke; great-grandson of George Washington and Mary (Fleming) Parke; 
great-grandson of Joseph Parke, Lieutenant-Colonel Chester County Penna. 
Associators and private, Captain McClelland's Company Light Dragoons; great- 
grandson of John Fleming, Jr., Wagon-master Penna. troops; great-grandson 
of John Fleming, Sr., Member Penna. Convention of 1776, Member of General 
Assembly of Penna.; grandson of Abner and Rose Elizabeth (White) Ncal; 
great-grandson of Abraham and Martha (Bussey) White; great-grandson of 
Abraham White, Major First Brigade Md. Artillery; great 2 -grandson of Bennett 
Bussey, Major Md. troops. 

ROBERT ABNER PARKE, Westminster, Md. (20086). Son of George Motter 
and Mary White (Ncal) Parke; grandson of Joseph Maxwell and Amanda 
(Motter) Parke; great-grandson of George Washington and Mary (Fleming) 
Parke; great-grandson of Joseph Parke, Lieutenant-Colonel- Chester County, 
Penna., Associators and private, Captain McClelland's Company Light Dra- 
goons; great-grandson of Jolm Fleming, Jr., Wagon-master Penna. troops; 
greats-grandson of John Fleming, Sr., Member Penna. Convention of 1776, 
Member of General Assembly of Penna.; grandson of Abner and Rose Elizabeth 
(White) Neal; great-grandson of Abraham and Martha (Bussey) White; great 2 - 
grandson of Abraham White, Major First Brigade Md. Artillery; great-grand- 
son of Bennett Bussey, Major Md. troops. 

THOMAS PERRY, Rear Admiral U. S. Navy, retired, Port Deposit, Md. (20542). 
Son of Guy Maxwell -and Elizabeth Asia (Taylor) Perry; grandson of Thomas 
Mifflin and Elizabeth (Konkle) Perry; great-grandson of William Perry, pri- 
vate Second Penna. Continental Line. 

ALFRED R. RIGGS, Baltimore, Md. (20094). Son of Lawrason and Mary Turpin 
(Bright) Riggs; grandson of Elisha and Alice (Lawrason) Riggs; great-grand- 
son of Samuel Riggs, Second Lieutenant, Col. Zadock Magruder's Maryland 
Regt.; grandson of Jesse D. and Mary Elizabeth (Turpin) Bright; great-grand- 
son of Horatio Turpin, Ensign Eighteenth Virginia Regt. 

JESSE BRIGHT RIGGS, Catonsville, Md. (20533). Son of Lawrason and Mary 
Turpin (Bright) Riggs; grandson of Elisha and Alice (Lawrason) Riggs; great- 
grandson of Samuel Riggs, Second Lieutenant, Col. Zadock Magruder's Mary- 
land Regt. 

LAWRASON RIGGS, Baltimore, Md. (20095). Son of Lawrason and Mary Tur- 
pin (Bright) Riggs; grandson of Elisha and Alice (Lawrason) Riggs; great- 
grandson of Samuel Riggs, Second Lieutenant, Col. Zadock Magruder's Mary- 
land Regt.; grandson of Jesse D. and Mary Elizabeth (Turpin) Bright; great- 
grandson of Horatio Turpin, Ensign Eighteenth Virginia Regt. 

THOMAS HINCKLEY ROBBINS, Baltimore, Md. (201 00). Son of Chandler and 
Sarah Ripley (Fiske) Robbins; grandson of Augustus H. and Hannah Rogers 
(Bradford) Fiske; great-grandson of Gamaliel Bradford, 3d, Lieutenant Seventh 
Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Gamaliel Bradford, Colonel Fourteenth Massa- 
chusetts Regt. 



REGISTER OF" NICW MEMBERS 25I 

EUGENE; FOSTER RODGERS, Baltimore, Md. (20526). Son of James W. and 
Laura Virginia (Godman) Rodgers; grandson of Thomas Wood and Mary (Bald- 
win) Godman; great-grandson of Brutus and Margaret (Wood) Godman; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Godman, Captain Fourth Battalion Maryland Continental 
troops. 

HARRY WHITFIELD RODGERS, Baltimore, Md. (20932). Son of James W. 
and Laura Virginia (Godman) Rodgers; grandson of Thomas Wood and Mary 
(Baldwin) Godman; great-grandson of Brutus and Mary (Wood) Godman; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Samuel Godman, Captain Fourth Maryland Battalion, Gen. 
William Smallwood. 

MYRON I. ROSE, Baltimore, Md. (20096). Son of Salem P. and Laurilla R. 
Rose; grandson of Justice and Deborah B. Rose, Jr.; great-grandson of Justice 
and Adah Rose; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan and Abigail Rose; great 3 -grandson 
of Jonathan Rose, private Mass. Minute Men and Continental service. 

STEINER SCHLEY, Frederick, Md. (200S5). Son of Fairfax and Ann Rebecca 
(Steiner) Schley; grandson of Henry and Sarah Maria (Worrell) Scldey; 
great-grandson of John and Mary (Shriver) Schley; great-'-grandson of David 
Shriver, Lieutenant-Colonel Maryland Militia; grandson of Christian and 
Rebecca (Weltzhcimer) Steiner; great-grandson of Henry Steiner; greats-grand- 
son of John Steiner, Captain Maryland Militia. 

EDWIN WILMER SHRIVER, Westminster, Md. (19049)- Son of Francis am! 
Matilda (Frysinger) Shriver; grandson of Isaac and Polly (Lcathcrman) 
Shriver; great-grandson of David Shriver, Lieutenant-Colonel Maryland troops. 

LAYTON FONTAINE SMITH, Baltimore, Md. (20934). Son of George Cook- 
man and Elizabeth Lee (Furrows) Smith; grandson of James Layton and 
Emily Louisa Josepha (Hall) Smith; great-grandson of David Smith; great 2 - 
grandson of Thomas Smith, Major Fifth Maryland Regt. 

EDMUND SMITH STILES, Baltimore, Md. (20084). Son of Norman C. and 
Sarah Maria (Smith) Stiles; grandson of Henry and Salacia (Avery) Stiles; 
great-grandson of James ami Mercy (Allyn) Avery; great-grandson of Simeon 
Allyn, Captain Conn, troops, killed at Groton Heights, 1781 ; grandson of 
Henry and Lucy Curtis (Butler) Smith; great-grandson of Levi and Betsey 
(Gibbs) Smith; grcat 2 -grandson of Bsekial Smith, private Conn, troops, pen- 
sioned. 

JOHN TIMOTHY STONE, Baltimore, Md. (20077). Son of Timothy Dwight 
Porter and Susan Margaret (Dickinson) Stone; grandson of Edwards and 
Susan (Henry) Dickinson; great-grandson of Timothy Dickinson, private Hamp- 
shire County Mass. Militia. 

NEWELL STONE, Baltimore, Md. (20528). Son of James Harvey and Frances 
Taylor (Rusk) Stone; grandson of James Harvey and Harriet Newell (Fussel- 
baugh) Stone; great-grandson of Harvey and Jerusha (Wheeler) Stone; great 2 - 
grandson of Caleb Wheeler and great :, -grandson of Elisha Wheeler, privates, 
Capt. John Nixon's Company of Minute Men, Col. Obijah Pierce's Mass. Regt. 

JAMES HOWELL TAYLOR, Meclford, Md. (20539). Son of James W. and 
Annie M. Taylor; grandson of Henry and Sophie Taylor; great-grandson of 
Thomas Taylor, private Third Maryland Regt, 

JOHN BENJAMIN THOMAS, Baltimore, Md. (20529). Son of John Benjamin 
and Charlotte O. Thomas; grandson of Lerin and Margaret (Dutrow) Thomas; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Thomas, Second Lieutenant Thirty-fourth Mary- 
land Battalion. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON WARD, Ellicott City, Md. (20537). Son of John Wes- 
ley and Sarah Catherine (Pedcficord) Ward; grandson of Enoch George and 
Jane (Thompson) Ward; great-grandson of Ignatius Pigman and Hester 
(Thompson) Ward; grcat--grandson of James Ward, private, Capt. John Gist's 
Maryland Company. 



252 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

. 

THEODORE B. WARNER, Baltimore, Md. (-0076). Son of Theodore and 
Blanche T. (Ilgenfritz) Warner; grandson of Marcellus S. and Elizabeth 
(Chamberlain) Ilgenfritz; great-grandson of James II. and Mary A. (Caughy) 
Chamberlain; great"-grandson of John J. and Anna (Barclay) Chamberlain; 
great ; '-grandson of James Cliamberlain, Captain Twenty-second Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

SAMUEL, MAITLAND WARNS, Baltimore, Md. (190,18). Son of Francis G. 
and Georgianna Olivia (Norris) Warns; grandson qf James and Georgianna 
Claiborne (Gray) Norris; great-grandson of John and Frances Hellen (Clai- 
borne) Gray; great-grandson of George Wythe and Mary King (Hellen) Clai- 
borne; great 3 -grandson of Thomas Claiborne, Member Virginia House of Bur- 
gesses and Norfolk Committee of Safety. 

THOMAS WILSON WILLIAMSON, Baltimore, Md. (20532). Son of Thomas 
Wilson and Griel Street (Green) Williamson; grandson of James Pryor and 
Harriet (Reed) Williamson; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Pryor) 
Williamson; great-grandson of Emory Pryor, First Lieutenant, Capt. Thomas 
Harris's Company Twentieth Battalion Maryland Militia. 

RUFUS KIDDFR WOOD, Baltimore, Md. (20530). Son of William and Elizabeth 
French (Kidder) Wood; grandson of Micajah and Rachel (Richardson) Wood; 
great-grandson of Amos Wood, Minute Man at Concord and private Fourth 
Regt. Essex County Mass. Militia; grandson of Moses and Rachel (Shcpard) 
Kidder; great-grandson of Isaac (and Sarah Stickney) Kidder, private, Capt. 
Solomon Pollard's Company, Colonel Green's Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grand- 
son of Abraham Stickney, Jr., Lieutenant Mass. Militia; great-grandson of 
Jonathan Richardson, Minute Man at Lexington Alarm, Capt. Peter Coburn's 
Company, Colonel Bridge's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Moses Richardson, 
private, Colonel Bridge's Regt. Mass. Militia and Colonel Jackson's Continental 
Regt. 

MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

JOHN WESLEY ADAMS, Mcthuen, Mass. (19989)- Son of John and Mary 
(Taggart) Adams; grandson of John and Mary (Russell) Adams; great-grand- 
son of Jonathan Adams, private, Whitcomb's and Cushing's Mass. Regts., pen- 
sioned. 

GEORGE CARLETON FENTON ALLEN, Lynn, Mass. (20202). Son of Edward 
Perkins and Sarah Ann (Fenton) Allen; grandson of James and Clarisse 
(Perkins) Allen; great-grandson of Ezra and Mary (Breed) Allen; great- 
grandson of A))ios Breed, private, Captain Farrington's Second Lynn Company 
Mass. Militia. 

SAMUEL WALLACE ARMINGTON, Holden, Mass. (19773). Son of Nathaniel 
Kent and Betsy (Carr) Armington; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Paine) 
Armington; great-grandson of Joseph Armington, private Mass. Militia; great- 
grandsou of John Armington, private, Col. Thomas Carpenter's Mass. Regt. 

SETII FENELON ARNOLD, Boston, Mass. (1077:2). Son of Fenelon and Emily 
Augusta (Marsh) Arnold; grandson of Ambrose T. and Priscilla (Ranney) 
Arnold; great-grandson of Seth Arnold, Corporal, Col. Noadiah Hooker's Mass. 
Regt.; grandson of Edmund A. and Isabella (Hosmer) Marsh; great-grandson 
of Daniel Marsh, private and drummer, Colonel Vose's Ma^s. Regt.; great- 
grandson of Jonas Hosmer, private, Colonel Bullard's Mass. Regt. 

RALPH WARREN BABB, Lynn, Mass. (2020.0. Son of Warren Preston and 
Mary Elizabeth (Hammond) Babb; grandson of Sylvanus and Hannah (Brown) 
Babb; great-grandson of Amos Doliber and Hannah (Bessom) Brown; great- 
grandson of John and Hannah (Laskey) Bessom; greats-grandson of Richard 
Bessom, private and malross Marblehead Mass. Militia. 

CARL VON BADGER, Lynn, Mass. (20470). Son of Edward Frank and Lillian 
May (Small) Badger; grandson of Lcander and Sophronia II. (Emmons) 
Badger; great-grandson of Benjamin and Sally (Sleeper) Emmons, Jr.; great 2 - 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 253 

grandson of Benjamin Emmons, Ensign, Capt. Edward Elliott's Company, 
Stark's Brigade New Hampshire Militia; grcat 2 -grandson of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Sanborn) Sleeper; great 3 -grandson of David Sleeper, private, Capt. Ed- 
ward Everett's Company, Colonel Bedel's New Hampshire Rcgt. 

CHARLES HOWARD BANGS, Lynn, Mars. (20732). Son of William Bean and 
Martha Philpot (Swett) Bangs; grandson of Sylvanus and Hannah E. (Bean) 
Bangs; great-grandson of Ebenezcr and Polly (Cobb) Bangs; great-'-grandson 
of Barnabas Bangs, Matross, Captain Lowell's Mass. Artillery Company, pri- 
vate, Colonel Phinney's Regt. 

ARTHUR WESLEY BARKER, Lynn, Mass. (19980). Son of Amos and Annah 
(Estes) Barker; grandson of Jonathan Barker, Jr., private Essex County Mass. 
Militia; great-grandson of Jonathan Barker, Sergeant, Gerrish's and other 
Mass. Regts. 

WILFRED MOLSON BARNES, Montreal, Canada (Mass. 20212). Son of Wil- 
liam Sullivan and Mary Alice (Turner) Barnes; grandson of Charles Augustus 
and Mary A. (Cummings) Turner; great-grandson of Abel and Alice (Rogers) 
Turner; great 2 -grandson of Job Turner, private, Colonel Bailey's Mass. Regt.; 
great 3 -grandson of John Turner, private, Capt. William Weston's Company 
Mass. Militia. 

ELMER GREENLEAF BATCHELDER, Lynn, Mass. (20733). Son of Joseph 
D. and Abigail (Davis) Batchclder; grandson of Solomon and Abigail (Hall) 
Davis; great-grandson of John and Hannah Davis; great 2 -grandson of Moses 
Davis, Member of Committee of Inspection and Safety for Nottingham, New 
Hampshire. 

GEORGE RICHARDSON BEARDSELL, Lynn, Mass. (19990). Son of George 
Richardson and Lucy Jane (Plympton) Beardsell; grandson of Edward Learned 
and Marcia A. (Ladd) Plympton; great-grandson of Luther and Lucy (Free- 
man) Plympton; great 2 -grandson of Frederick and Elizabeth Plimpton; great 3 - 
grandson of Daniel Plimpton, Lieutenant-Colonel, Holman's Mass. Regt.; 
great 2 -grandson of Comfort Freeman, Sergeant, Colonel Davis's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS BELCHER, Saugus, Mass. (19091). Son of William and 
Lydia (Lord) Belcher; grandson of William and Celia (Beal) Belcher; great- 
grandson of Elijah Belcher, Jr., private Mass. Artillery; great 2 -grandson of 
Elijah Belcher, private, Mcintosh's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE EDWARD BICKNELL, Lowell, Mass. (20222). Son of George Waters 
and Ella (Howard) Bicknell; grandson of Bela and Abagail (Waters) Bick- 
nell; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Ramsdell) Bicknell; great 2 - 
grandson of Luke Bicknell, Captain, Lieut. -Col. Enoch Putnam's Mass. Regt. 
and other service. 

HARRY EMERSON BICKNELL, Northampton, Mass. (20223). Son of Luke 
Emerson and Lucrctia Tower (Pierce) Bicknell; grandson of Almond T. and 
Betsey B. (Tower) Pierce; great-grandson of Asa and Clarissa (Bales) Tower; 
great 2 -grandson of Asa and Deborah (Dyer) Tower; grcat 3 -grandson of Peter 
Tower, Jr., private, Colonel Lovell's and other Regts. Mass. Militia; great- 
grandson of John and Bathsheba (Bridges) Pierce; great 2 -grandson of Shad- 
rack Pierce, Jr., Corporal, Col. Job Cushing's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE HERBERT BREED, Lynn, Mass. (20224). Son of William Nehemiah 
and Caroline Augusta (Norton) Breed; grandson of George A. and Elizabeth 
Sutton (Lord) Horton; great-grandson of Benjamin and Susannah (Sutton) 
Lord; great 2 -grandson of Richard Sutton, Second Lieutenant Third Essex 
County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of George and Hannah (Andrews) 
Horton; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Andrews, malross, Capt. Edward Fetty- 
place's Company Mass. Artillery; great-grandson of Benjamin I^ord, private 
Mass. Continental troops; great 2 -grandson of Philip Lord, private, Capt. Thomas 
Burnham's Company Mass. Militia. 

FRED AYMAR BROAD, Lynn, Mass. (20734). Son of James Harding and Am- 
bcrzine Frances (Aymar) Broad; grandson of Francis William and Harriet 



I 

2^4 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

(Harding) Broad; great-grandson of Timothy and Lucy (Smith) Broad, Jr.; 
grcat--grandson of Timothy Broad, private, Col. William Heath's Mass. Regt. 
GEORGE DUNHAM BURCIIMORE, Maiden, Mass. (20735). Son of George and 
Caroline M. (Jepson) Burchmore; grandson of Stephen and Hannah (Dun- 
ham) Burchmore; great-grandson of Zachariah Burchmore, Commander priva- 
teer brigantinc "Hector," of Boston, Mass. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE, Northampton, Mass. (2045S). Son of George 
Washington and Rebecca (Boardman) Cable; grandson of Amos and Sylvia 
(Noble) Boardman; great-grandson of Ezckiel Noble, private, Col. John Ash- 
ley's Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

MIAL WOODBURY CHASE, Lynn, Mass. (19981). Son of Zachariah Jordan 
and Harriett Helen (Moon) Chase; grandson of Robert and Sarah (Chccver) 
Moon; great-grandson of Abijah and Hannah (Proctor) Cheever; great 2 - 
grandson of Abncr (and Nancy Newhnll) Chccver, Jr., Corporal, Parker's 
Lynn Company of Minute Men; great 2 -grandson of Ezra Nczvhall, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Fourth and Fifth Mass. Continental Regts. 

WILLIAM HENRY CHOATE, Lowell, Mass. (20221). Son of George and Lucy 
Ann (Baker) Choate; grandson of James Choate, private, Col. Nathaniel 
Wade's and other Mass. Regts. 

ALVIN WINTHROP CLAPP, Northampton, Mass. (20215). Son of Martin 
Luther 'and Frances A. (Phelps) Clapp; grandson of Lucius and Achsah 
(Clark) Clapp; great-grandson of Paul Clark, private Eighth Mass. Regt. and 
other service; great--grandson of Jonathan Phelps, private, Colonel May's Mass. 
Regt. 

FRANK LUCIUS CLAPP, Northampton, Mass. (20216). Son of Edwin Clark and 
Charlotte Elizabeth (Haughton) Clapp; grandson of Lucius and Achsah (Clark) 
Clapp; great-grandson of Paul Clark, private Eighth Mass. Regt. and other 
service; grcat 2 -grandson of Jonathan Phelps, private, Colonel May's Mass. Regt. 

EDWARD WARREN CLARK, Lowell, Mass. (20736). Son of Joshua and Maria 
Hannah Clark; grandson of Oliver and Abby (Richardson) Clark; great-grand- 
son of Jcihtthun Richardson, First Lieutenant Second Middlesex County Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE JACQUES COLLINS, Lynn, Mass. (20204). Son of Alexander Mitch- 
ell and Helen Augusta (Baker) Collins; grandson of Daniel Collins and Au- 
gusta (Chase) Baker; great-grandson of Elisha and Ruth (Collins) Baker; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Bauer, private, Col. Thomas Carpenter's Mass. 
Regt. 

EDWIN TUCKER COWELL, Dorchester, Mass. (20743). Son of David Lovcll 
and Hannah (Gay) Cowcll; grandson of Seth and Patience (Gannett) Gay; 
great-grandson of Deborah Sampson (alias Robert Shirt lift), private Fourth 
Mass. Regt. 

WINTHROP MURRAY CRANE, Dalton, Mass., U. S. Senator (20213). Son of 
Zenas Marshal and Louise (Lailin) Crane; grandson of Zenas and Lucinda 
(Brewer) Crane; great-grandson of Steplicn Crane, private Thirty-sixth Regt. 
Mass. Foot and other service; great-grandson of Gains Brezver, Sergeant, Col. 
Charles Pynehon's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Winthrop and Fanny (Loomis) 
Laflin; great-grandson of Mathew and Lydia (Rising) Lailin; great--grandson 
of Mathew Lailin, Sergeant, Col. John Moscley's Hampshire County Mass. 
Regt.; great-grandson of Ham and Elizabeth (Allen) Loomis; great 2 -grandson 
of Noah Loomis, private, Capt. Silas Fowler's Mass. Company at Lexington 
Alarm. 

WINTHROP MURRAY CRANE, JR., Dalton, Mass. (20214). Son of Winthrop 
Murray and Mary (Benner) Crane; grandson of Zenas Marshal and Louise 
(.Laflin) Crane; great-grandson of Zenas and Lucinda (Brewer) Crane; great 2 * 
grandson of Stephen Crane, private Thirty-sixth Regt. Mass. Foot and other 
service; great-grandson of Cains 'Brewer, Sergeant, Col. Charles Pynehon's 
Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Winthrop arid Fanny (Loomis) Lailin; great s - 



REGISTER OP NI'W MEMBERS 



-03 



grandson of Mathew and Lydia (Rising) Laflin; great 3 -grandson of Mathew 
La/Hn, Sergeant, Col. John Moseley's Hampshire County Mass. Regt. ; great 2 - 
grandson of Ham and Elizabeth (Allen) Eoomis; great 3 -grandson of Noah 
Loomis, private, Capt. Silas Fowler's Mass. Company at Lexington Alarm. 

ZENAS CRANE, Dalton, Mass. (20459). Son of Zenas Marshal and Caroline 
(Eaflin) Crane; grandson of Zenas and Lucinda (Brewer) Crane; great-grandson 
of Stephen Crane, private, Colonel Robinson's and other Mass. Regis.; grand- 
son of Winthrop and Fanny (Eoomis) Eaflin; great-grandson. ..of Ham and 
Elizabeth (Allen) Eoomis; great-'-grandson of Noah Loomis, private, Capt. 
Silas Fowler's Company at Lexington Alarm; great-grandson of Mathew and 
Lydia (Rising) Lailin; great 2 -grandson of Mathew Laflin, Sergeant, Col. John 
Moseley's Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Gains 
Brewer, Sergeant, Capt. James Shaw's Company, Col. Charles Pynchon's Mass. 
Regt. 

WILLIAM SUMNER CROSBY, Brookline, Mass. (19992). Son of Sumner and 
Harriot (Blanchard) Crosby; grandson of Jeremiah (and Abigail Jaquith) 
Crosby, private Mass. troops; great-grandson of Benjamin Jaqiiith, private 
Mass. troops; grandson of Joseph (and Sarah Brown) BlancJiard, private Mass. 
troops; great-grandson of Jonathan Brown, Colonel Mass. troops; Member Mass. 
Provincial Congress. 

HAROLD DUNCAN ' DARLING, Hyde Park, Mass. (20468). Son of Francis 
Woods and Anna Evelina (Kccne) Darling; grandson of George and Eliza A. 
(Duncan) Darling; great-grandson of Samuel and Esther (Dinglcy) Darling; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Darling, private, Colonel Warren's and other Mass. 
Rcgts. 

JAMES MANNING DAY, Newark, N. J. (Mass. 20225). Son of Jonathan and 
Charlotte (Everett) Day; grandson of Loammi Day, private, Attleboro Com- 
pany Mass. Militia; grandson of Samuel Everett, Sergeant, Col. Rufus Put- 
nam's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Jeremiah Everett, private, Col. Timothy 
Walker's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE VAN NESS DEARBORN, Cambridge, Mass. (10654). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Cornelius Van Ness and Louisa Frances (Eaton) Dearborn; grandson 
of Moses Webster and Louisa Shepherd (Lawrence) Laton; great-grandson of 
Thomas and Betsy (I^aton) Eaton; grcat 2 -grandson of Obadiah Eaton, private, 
Capt. John Hale's Company, Lieut. -Col. Henry Gerrish's Regt. of New Hamp- 
shire Volunteers; great-grandson of Joseph and Susannah Shepherd (Hutchin- 
son) Lawrence; grcat'-'-grandson of Joseph Lawrence, Lieutenant, Col. John 
Stark's New Hampshire Regt. 

MARTIN LUTHER DINSMORE, Springfield, Mass. (20205). Son of Samuel and 
Sarah II. (Lovett) Dinsmore; grandson of Robert P. and Sally (Gregg) Dins- 
more; great-grandson of Kobcrt Dinsmore, fifer, Col. Daniel Moore's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

SAMUEL DWIGHT DRURY, Northampton, Mass. (20471). Son of Amos Kellogg 
and Charlotte II. (Parmelec) Drury; grandson of Amos and Sarah P. (Swift) 
Drury; great-grandson of Calvin and Azubah (Harwood) Drury; great-grand- 
son of Ebenescr Drury, private, Capt. Benjamin Cooley's Company, Col. Ebe- 
nczer Allen's Regt. Vermont Militia; grandson of Joseph and Rhoda (Lewis) 
Parmelec; great-grandson of Eli Lewis, Sergeant, First Company' Hooker's 
Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of Oliver Parmelec, Lieutenant Connecticut Light 
Horse. 

THEODORE FISKE DWIGHT, Springfield, Mass. (20737). Son of Harry A. 
and Lucia D. Dwight; grandson of William and Amaryllis (Fiskc) Dwight; 
great-grandson of William Dwight, Captain Conn. Militia. 

LEON CLIFTON ELLIS, Lynn, Mass. (20206). Son of Charles Francis and 
Hannah Jane (Burgess) Ellis; grandson of Abner and Hannah (.Whiting) 
Burgess; great-grandson of Abner and Deborah (Wright) Burgess; great-- 






256 SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



grandson of William Burgess, private, Col. John Washburn's Mass. Regt.; 
greats-grandson of Nathaniel Burgess, private, Capt. Andrew Samson's Mass. 
Company; great-grandson of Nathan and Rebecca (Doten) Whiting; great-- 
grandson of Isaac Doten, private, Stearns's and Whitney's Mass. Regts. ; 
grandson of Thomas and Joanna Ellis; great-grandson of Thomas and Rebecca 
(Burgess) Ellis; great 2 -grandson of Elisha Burgess, private, Colonel Freeman's 
Mass. Regt. 

LORENZO CHASE FARWELE, Dorchester, Mass. (20217). Son of Frank Foster 
and Ella Augusta (Chase) Farwell; grandson of Lorenz; and Rachel Godfrey 
(Lathrop) Chase; great-grandson of Calvin and Betsy (Clapp) Chase; great-- 
grandson of John Lathrop, Corporal, Colonel Carpenter's and other Mass. Regts. 

JAMES MONROE FAY, Northampton, Mass. (19982). Son of Warren and Jane 
D. (Bell) Fay; grandson of Timothy and Hannah (Jones) Fay; great-grandson 
of Timotliy Fay, private Third Conn. Regt. 

HORACE WILEY FIELD, Northampton, Mass. (19993). Son of Henry Hillman 
and Marictte (Wade) Field; grandson of Horace Wiley and Elizabeth Miranda 
(Hillman) Field; great-grandson of Walter and Elizabeth Sprague (Wiley) 
Field; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Field, private Mass. Militia, Member Council 
of Safety; great-grandson of Justin and Abigail (Taylor) Hillman; great-- 
grandson of Lot Hillman, private Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES C. FEINT, Lenox, Mass. (20207). Son of John S. and Lydia E- 
(Kelly) Flint; grandson of James L,. Flint, Sergeant Sixth Regt. Conn. Line. 

WARREN WYMAN FOX, Dracut, Mass. (20451). Son of Roswell Schuyler and 
Nellie Maria (Wyman) Fox; grandson of Darius Lincoln and Mary Jane 
(Peabody) Fox; great-grandson of Russell and Hepzibah (Peabody) Fox; great 2 - 
grandson of David (and Sarah Russell) Fox, private, Colonel Green's and other 
Regts. Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Stephen Russell, Captain Sixth Com- 
pany, Col. Simeon Spaulding's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JAMES FREEMAN DANA GARFIELD, Fitchburg, Mass. (20744). Son of 
EHsha and Bathsheba (Egerton Stearns) Garfield; grandson of James (and 
Bathsheba Walker) Egerton, private, Colonel Prescott and Colonel Mcintosh's 
Mass. Regts.; great-grandson of Samuel Walker, private at Lexington Alarm 
under Capt. Henry Haskell. 

EDWARD ONVILLE GOLDTHWAIT, Lynn, Alass. (19994). Son of Jonathan 
Marble and Lucy Jane (Wiggins) Goldthwait; grandson of James and Sally 
(Chadwell) Wiggins; great-grandson of Harris Chadivcll, Lieutenant Mass. 
troops; grandson of William and Pamelia (Sheldon) Goldthwait; great-grandson 
of William (and Abigail King) Goldthwait, private, Colonel Pickering's Mass. 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Zachariah King, private Mass. Militia. 

JOHN FORREST GOLDTHWAIT, Lynn, Mass. (19995). Son of John and Lydia 
Ann (Hart) Goldthwait; grandson of Daniel and Susan (Curtis) Goldthwait; 
great-grandson of Allen and Elizabeth (Estes) Curtis; great-grandson of 
Nathaniel Estes, private Mass. troops; great-grandson of John and Eunice 
(Thomas) Goldthwaite; greats-grandson of Israel Thomas, private Mass. Con- 
tinental troops. 

GEORGE HERBERT GRAHAM, Lynn, Mass. (20745). Son of Dwight Herbert 
and Augusta Minerva (Brown) Graham; grandson of Webster and Maria 
(Hoyt) Brown; great-grandson of Zalmon and Sally (Benedict) Hoyt; great-- 
grandson of Isaac and Huldah (Weed) Hoyt; great n -grandson of Jesse Hoyt, 
private Fourth Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

FRANCIS ALONZO GRAY, Somerville, Mass. (20472). Son of Samuel Fairfield 
and Abigail Whitehouse (Foster) Gray; grandson of Josiah and Eunice (Fuller) 
Gray; great-grandson of Andrew and Betsey (Brown) Fuller; grcat 2 -grandson 
of Andrew and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Fuller; great 3 -grandson of Israel 
Hutchinson, Lieutenant Colonel Mass. Militia, Colonel 27th Continental 
Infantry. 



REGISTER 01? NEW MEMBERS 257 

FRANK WEBSTER HALL, Lowell, Mass. (20218). Son of Robert I,. and Emily 
E. (Webster) Hall; grandson of Josiah C. and Mehitabel (Buck) Webster; 
great-grandson of William and Hannah (Chase) Webster; great-grandson of 
Josiah (.and Mehitabel l'rye) Chase, Surgeon, Colonel Stickney's New Hamp- 
shire Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Fryc, Major-General Mass. ' troops; 
grandson of. Robert and Erfie (Drinkwater) Spencer; great-grandson of Jolm 
and Mary (Urann) Spencer; great :; -grandson of Thomas Urann, Captain of 
Artificers at Boston, Mass. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM HAMILTON, Tufts College, Mass. (2A452). Son of 
Jonas and Angelina Sombardo (Sawyer) Hamilton; grandson of Jonas and 
Abigail (Bradbury) Hamilton; great-grandson of William Hamilton, private, 
Capt. Thomas Hartshorn's Company, Col. Michael Jackson's Mass. Regt. 

ADAM AUGUSTUS tIAWKES, Wakefield, Mass. (9272). (Supplemental.) Son 
of Adam and Susan (Mean) llawkes; grandson of Adam and Martha (Green) 
Hawkes; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Martha Green; great— grandson of 
Thomas Green, Ensign, Col. David Green's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

EDGAR BROOKS HAWKES, Wakefield, Mass. (20746). Son of Adam Augustus 
and Cora (Brooks) ITawkes; grandson of Adam and Susan (Dean) Hawkes; 
great-grandson of Adam and Martha (Green) llawkes; great-grandson of 
sldam Haivkes, private, Capt. David Parker's Company Lynn, Mass., Minute 
Men. 

DAVID EDSON II1I,L, Lynn, Mass. (20460). Son of Andrew Evans and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Dodge) ' Hill; grandson of William Bong and Mary Ann (Collin) 
Dodge; great-grandson of Samuel and Eydia (Bong) Dodge; great-grandson of 
Thomas Dodge, private, Capt. John Dodge's Company, Col. Jacob Gerrish's 
Mass. Regt. 

HAROLD DALE HINCKLEY, South Baltimore, Md. (Mass. 20473)- Son of 
Sylvanus and Isarlee (Bearse) Hinckley; grandson of 1'li and Charlotte (Tobey) 
Hinckley; great-grandson of Sylvanus Hinckley, private, Capt. Flisha Nye's 
Company Mass. Continental troops, and Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES' ELLSWORTH HODGDON, Swampscott, Mass. (20738). Son of 
Leander Fowler and Hattie Adalinc (Brown) Hodgdon; grandson of Adrial 
Huzzey and Mary Swett (Fowler) Hodgdon; great-grandson of Joshua and 
Martha (Libby) Hodgdon; great-grandson of Caleb Hodgdon, Major, Colonel 
Wingate's and Colonel Long's New Hampshire Regts. 

PERCIVAL JERAULD HOLMES, Somerville, Mass. (20474). Son of William 
Boyd and Florence E. (Jerauld) Holmes; grandson of Charles and Elizabeth S. 
(Cordis) Holmes; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Martha (Davenport) Holmes; 
grcat 2 -grandson of llbcneser (and Hannah Paul) Holmes, private Mass. Militia, 
pensioned; grcat 3 -grandson of Samuel Holmes, private Mass. Militia; great 3 - 
grandson of Samuel Davenport, private Mass. Militia at Lexington Alarm; 
grandson of Horace D. and Mary F. (Cooper) Jerauld; great-grandson of 
Stephen and Elizabeth (Arnold) Jerauld; great-grandson of JosejJi Arnold, 
private Rhode Bland Militia; great-grandson of James ami Mary (Rice) 
Jerauld; great :, -grandson of Dulec Jerauld, Ensign Rhode Island Militia; ^cat- 
grandson of Girard and Priscilla (Knight) Cordis; great-grandson of Betcr 
and Reliance (Dyer) Knight; great ;, -grandson of Judah Dyer, private .Mass. 
Militia and Capt. George Webb's Company Continental Army. 

WILLIAM BOYD HOLMES, Boston, .Mass. (1632S). (Supplemental.) Son of 
Charles ami Elizabeth (Cordis) Holmes; grandson of Girard and Prisciria 
(Knight) Cordis; great-grandson of Peter and Reliance (Dyer) Knight; great- 
grandson of Judah Dyer, Jr., private, Capt. Isaiah Higgins's and other Mass. 
Companies. 

JAMES FREDERICK INGALLS, Lynn, Mass. (20747). Son of James Witley 
and Alary. Ann (Jackson) Ingalls; grandson of James and Lorana (Witley) 
Ingalls; great-grandson of Henry and widow Susanna Brown Ingalls; great- 
grandson of Amos and Mary (Ingalls) Ingalls; great-grandson ^i Jacob In- 

n 



258 



SONS 01' T1IK AMERICAN REVOLUTION 






galls, father oi" I\Iary, private, Capt. William Farrington's Company Lynn, 
Mass., Militia. 

ARTHUR LILLIE KINGSBURY, Northampton, Mass. (19996). Son of Addison 
and Charlotte Elizabeth (l,illie) Kingsbury; grandson of Alvin and Emmeline 
Kingsbury; great-grandson of Jabez and Freelove (Utley) Kingsbury; great-- 
grandson of Bphraim Kingsbury, Ensign Third Battalion Conn, troops, Colonel 
Enos. 

HENRY PRESTON KITTREDGE, Quincy, Mass. (20750). Son of Preston P. and 
Mary Spear (Baxter) Kittredge; grandson of Elijah and Eucinda (Spear) 
Baxter; great-grandson of Edward Willard Baxter, private, Col. Thomas Mar- 
shall's Sixth Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE EVERETT PANE, Lynn, Mass. (20453). Son of. George Washington 
and Sarah Alwilda Ann (Pooley) Lane; grandson of Sarchwill R. and Hannah 
(Thompson) Lane; great-grandson of Webster and Mercy (Smith) Lane; great 2 - 
grandson of John (and Mary Colby) Lane, First Lieutenant, Capt. Stephen 
Dearborn's Company, Col. Thomas Slickney's New Hampshire Regt.; great- 
grandson of Janus and Hannah (Carter) Thompson; great-grandson of Daniel 
and Molly (Chase) Carter; grcat 3 -grandson of Daniel Carter, private, Capt. 
Benjamin Sias's Company, Col. David Oilman's New Hampshire Regt.; great 3 - 
grandson of Bcnaiah Colby (Colaby), Corporal, Capt. Joseph Dearborn's Com- 
pany New 'Hampshire Continental troops. 

GEORGE IRVING [BAILEY] LELAND, Lynn, Mass. (19983). Adopted by 
Frederic Lcland. Son of George Tilton and Fanny (Wood) Bailey; grandson 
of William and Ann Homer (Tilton) Bailey; great-grandson of Eliphalet Bailey, 
private Mass. troops. 

CALVIN LORD, Boston, Mass. (15303). (Supplemental.) Son of Joseph Henry 
and Elizabeth Russell (Hathaway) Lord; grandson of Calvin and Abigail 
Drake (Nutter) Lord; great-grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Wentworth) 
Lord; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Lord, minute man of Berwick, Mass.; grand- 
son of Samuel Russell and Elizabeth (Foxley) Hathaway; great-grandson of 
Elcazcr and Lois Hooper (Russell) Hathaway; grcat 2 -grandson of Samuel 
Hooper and Nancy (Pedrick) Russell; ' great 3 -grandson of John Roads and 
Lois (Hooper) Russell; great 4 -grandson of John Russell and of Samuel Hooper, 
Members of Committee of Inspection of Marblehead, Mass.; great-grandson of 
Grafton Nutter, private, Colonel Stickney's New Hampshire Regt.; great 4 - 
grandson of Caleb Wentworth, private, Col. Enoch Poor's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

CHARLES FOSTFR LOVEJOY, Lynn, Mass. (19997). Son of Charles Avcrill 
and Alice Louisa (Foster) Lovcjoy; grandson of Charles and Sarah Susan 
(Averill) Lovejoy; great-grandson of Frederick and Pamelia (Tuttlc) Lovcjoy; 
great e -grandson of Samuel Lovejoy, private, Colonel Wigglesworth's Mass. 

Regt. 

DAVID L. LOW, Attleboro, Mass. (19774). Son of Moses Allen and Anna Maria 
(Sargent) Low; grandson of David and Elizabeth (Rogers) Low; great-grand- 
son of John Low, Colonel Mass. Militia; grandson of Winthrop and Emily 
(Haskell) Sargent; great-grandson of Fitz William and Nancy (Parsons) 
Sargent; great'-'-grandson of Winthrop Sargent, Member Committee of Safety 
of Gloucester, Mass. 

ALBERT HOWARD McKFNZIF, Gloucester, Mass. (20208). Son of Robert 
Crockett and Ellen Maria (Story) McKcnzie; grandson of Cyrus and Susan 
Story; great-grandson of Amos and Susan (Rowe) Story; great 2 -grandson of 
John Story, Sergeant Third Essex County Mass. Regt.; groat 3 -grandson of 
Joseph Roivc, private, Capt. Daniel Warner's Gloucester Mass. Company. 

HFRVFY MASON, Jr., Melrose, Mass. (19988). Sou of Hcrvey and Abbie Sarah 
(Ilambly) Mason; grandson of Benjamin and Berniah A. (Sherman) Hambly; 
great-grandson of Carleton and Sarah (Brayton) Sherman; grcat 2 -grand90n of 
Francis Brayton, Sergeant, Colonel Pope's and other Mass. Regts. 



REGISTER 01? NEW MEMBERS 259 

WALLACE EDWARD MASON, North Andover, Mass. (20461). Son of John E. 
and Lizzie (Randall) Mason; grandson of George Knight and Martha Haynes 
(Merrill) Randall; great-grandson of Nathaniel Randall, private, Col. Joshua 
Wingate's New Hampshire Regt. 

ROY WENTWORTH MATHES, Lynn, Mass. (20748). Son of Hamilton Augus- 
tus and Rosabclle Sarah (Hoitt) Mathes; grandson of Gorham Washington and 
Abbie Page (Locke) Hoitt; great-grandson of Samuel and Betsey (Piper) Hcitt; 
gre.at 2 -grandson of Stephen Hoit, private, Col. Isaac Wyman's New Hampshire 
Rcgt. 

JOHN HAMILTON MEANS, Boston, Mass. (.20463). Son of John W. and Sophia 
(Rurnney) Means; grandson of Edward Rumncy, First Lieutenant, Capt. John 
Popkin's Company, Col. Richard Gridley's Mass. Artillery Rcgt. 

DARIUS LANDEN VIGUS MOFFETT, Boston, Mass. (11520). (Supplemental.) 
Son of William Ncwland and Anne Elizabeth (Vigns) Moffctt; grandson of 
John and Mary McKee (Wayne) Moffctt; great-grandson of Charles Seldcn and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Tyson) Moffctt; grcat 2 -grandson of John Moffctt, Captain 
Virginia troops. 

GEORGE CORYDON MORRELL, Boston, Mass. (20464). Son of Paschal Pope 
and Julia (Fernald) Morrell; grandson of William Wentworth and Waite 
(Salisbury) Eernald; great-grandson of John Fernald (Furnal), private, Col. 
Jacob Gerrish's and Col. Joseph Prime's Mass. Regts. 

CHARLES SUMNER MURRAY, Lynn, Mass. (20462). Son of James and Sarah 
Emiline (Jacobs) Murray; grandson of Allan and Sally (Dwinell) Jacobs; 
great-grandson of Ebenczer Jacobs, Jr., private, Capt. Jeremiah Page's Com- 
pany Mass. Militia. 

HORACE WILLIAMSON MURRAY, Lynn, Mass. (20209). Son of James and 
Sarah Emiline (Jacobs) Murray; grandson of Allan and Sally (Dwinell) Jacobs; 
great-grandson of Eboiczcr Jacobs, Jr., private, Capt. Jeremiah Page's Masa. 
Company. 

JAMES WARREN MURRAY, Lynn, Mass. (20210). Son of James and Sarah 
Emiline (Jacobs) Murray; grandson of Allan and Sally (Dwinell) Jacobs; 
great-grandson of Ebenezcr Jacobs, Jr., private, Capt. Jeremiah Page's Mass. 
Company. 

GEORGE TEEL OSBORN, Lynn, Mass. (20454). Son of John and Anna Poster 
(Tcel) Osborn; grandson of George Myrick and Abigail (Swan) Teel; great- 
grandson of Gershom and Eliza (Scott) Teel; great'-'-grandson of Gershom 
Teel, Corporal, William Bond's Thirty-seventh Mass. Regt. 

JOHN HANSON OSBORN, Lynn, Mass. (20219). Son of John and Anna Foster 
(Teel) Osborn; grandson of George Myrick and Abigail (Swan) Teel; great- 
grandson of Gershom and Eliza (Scott) Teel; great : -grandson of Gershom Teel, 
Corporal, William Bond's Thirty-seventh Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES ERWIN PARKHURST, Somerville, Mass. (20475). Son of Charles 
and Lucia Ann (Tyler) Parkhurst; grandson of Chester M. and Sarah Ann 
(Barnard) Parkhurst; great-grandson of ITcman and Laura (Vail) Parkhurst; 
grcat 2 -grai)dson "f Ebenczer f'arkhurst, Lieutenant, Capt. Timothy Bush's Com- 
pany, Colonel Marsh's Regt. Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES MERIAM PEAR, Boston, Mass. (12463). (Supplemental.) Son of 
John Smith and Sarah Roberts (Hurd) Pear; grandson of Samuel and .Mary 
(Brackett) Hind; great-grandson of Joseph Brackctt, private, Capt. Ebcnezer 
Sullivan's Company, Col. Scammon's Mass. Regt. 

ARTHUR EMMONS PEARSON, Boston, Mass. (12313). (Supplemental.) Son 
of William Henry and Nancy Delia (Benjamin) Pearson; grandson <A William 
and Lucinda Maria (Greenleaf) Pearson; great-grandson of Hiram an I Alice 
f Barron) Pearson; great L '-grand:;on of Joshua and Lavina (Derby) Barron; 
great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Derby, Lieutenant, Chase's New Hampshire Regt. 

WILLIAM EDWARD PEARSON, Boston, Mass. (12314). (Supplemental.) Son 
of Edward Ashcr and Sophia Downing (Owens) Pearson; grandson of William 



260 



SONS OL-' TillC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



and Lucinda Maria (Grccidcaf) Pearson; great-grandson of Hiram and Alice 

(Barron) Pearson; great-grandson of Joshua and Lavina (Derby) Barron; 

grcat 3 -grandson of Jonathan Derby, Lieutenant, Chase's New Hampshire Regt. 

WILLIAM HENRY PEARSON, Boston, Mass (752). (Supplemental.) Son of 

William and Lucinda Maria (Grccnlcaf) Pearson; grandson of Hiram and Alice 
(Barron) Pearson; great-grandson of Joshua and Lavina (Derby) Barron; 
great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Derby, Lieutenant, Chase's New Hampshire Regt. 

GEORGE EDWARD PILLSBURY, Lynn, Mass. (19984). Son of James Nelson 
and Sarah Mclchcr (Leavitt) Pillsbury; grandson of James Nelson and Lydia 
Brown (Alley) Pillsbury; great-grandson of Caleb and Nancy (Nelson) Pills- 
bury; great 2 -grandson of Caleb Pillsbury, Captain Mass. Militia; gieat :, -grandson 
of Caleb Pillsbury, Captain Alass. Militia; great-grandson of Aimer and Susanna 
(Brown) Alley; great 2 -grandson of Abner Alley, private Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM II. CLARK PILLSBURY, Somerville, Mass. 09775)- Son of Edward 
Howard and Helen Libby (Pillsbury) Clark; grandson of Edward and Abigail 
(Hicks) Clark; great-grandson of Ephraim Clark, seaman under John Paul 
Jones and Corporal New Hampshire troops. 

ARTHUR WELLINGTON PINKHAM, Lynn, Mass. ('19167). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Charles Hacker and Jennie Barker (Jones) Pinkham; grandson of John 
Armstead and Lucy K. (Barker) Jones; great-grandson of Asa and Lois 
(Choate) Barker; great 2 -grandson of Asa Darker, private Mass. Militia; grand- 
son of Isaac and Lydia (Estcs) Pinkham; great-grandson of Daniel and Abigail 
(Hawkes) Pinkham; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Pinkham, Ensign, Poor's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

HENRY BURT POMEROY, Cortland, N. Y. (Mass. 18051). (Supplemental). Son 
of King Burt and Sarah (Clapp) Pomeroy; grandson of Martin and Lucretia 
(Farnham) Clapp; great-grandson of Samuel Clapp, private Hampshire County 
Mass. Militia; grandson of Samuel and Dorcas (Burt) Pomeroy; great-grandson 
of Martin and Dorcas (Clark) Burt; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Burt, private 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Elijah and Ruth (Phelps) Pomeroy; great 8 - 
grandson of Samuel Phelps, private, Pomeroy's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM HENRY POMEROY, Springfield, Mass. (19998). Son of Stephen 
Franklin and Joanna Latimer (Watrous) Pomeroy; grandson of Henry R. and 
Mary (Chadwick) Watrous; great-grandson of James and Rachel (Latimer) 
Chadwiek; great'-'-grandson of George and Rachel (Smith) Latimer; great 3 - # 
grandson of Jonathan I^atimcr, Colonel Conn. Militia. 

HERBERT CYRUS PUFFER, Springfield, Mass. (2021 1 ). Son of Reuben and 
Nancy (Walker) 1'ulTer; grandson of Paul and Elizabeth (Bogle) Walker; 
great-grandson of Roan, or Rowland, Bogle, Second Lieutenant Fourth Regt. 
Middlesex County Mass. Militia. 

JOSEPH ARTHUR RADDIN, Cliftondale, Mass. (19999). Son of Joseph Albert 
and Charlotte Elizabeth (Breed) Raddin; grandson of Charles and Elizabeth 
(Mansfield) Raddin; great-grandson of Joseph and Lucy (Swcetser) Raddin; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Bullard .Redden (or Raddin), Sergeant Mass. 
Militia; great-grandson of Richard and Sarah (Pearson) Mansfield; great-grand- 
son of Richard Mansfield, private Mass. Militia; grandson of Ephraim and Jane 
Elizabeth (Swcetser) Breed; great-grandson of Joseph and l.liza (Waldcn) 
Breed; great 2 -grandson of Ephraim Breed, private Mass. Militia. 

FRANK HUNT RANDLETT, Roxbury, Mass. (20749). Son of Nathaniel and 
Miria Louisa (Robbe) Randlett; grandson of Charles Lewis and Harriet 
(French) Robbe; great-grandson of Samuel and Betsey (Scott 1 ) Robbe; great- 
grandson of Alexander Robbe, Captain, Col. Enoch Hale's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

EVERETT CLARKE RICA, Maiden, Mass. (20726). Son of F.ben and Charlotte 
A. (Clarke) Rea; grandson of Ebenczer and Mary (Woodbury) Ray; great- 
grandson of Ebeneser Rea, private, Capt. Jonathan Proctor's Company, Colonel 
Gerrish's Regt. Mass. Guards. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 261 

EDWARD RICHARDSON, Wellesiey Hills, Mass. (1998s). Son of George Eliot 
and .Sarah Law (Devoll) Richardson; grandson of Edward and Mercy (Owen) 
Richardson; great-grandson of Alford and Susanna. (Barneville) Richardson; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Asa (and Jane Wyman) Ricliardson, private Mass. Militia; 
grcat 3 -grandson of Paul Wyman, private Mass. Militia at Lexington Alarm; 
grandson of Zcbedee Augustus and Sarah Wood (1 lowland) Devoll; great- 
grandson of Bradford and Susan Brown (Law) Rowland; great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel Howland, Jr., private Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Gideon and 
Eunice (Rowland) Devoll; great 2 -grandson of David Devoll, Devoil, private 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of John and Mercy (Cushman) Owen; great 2 - 
grandson of Ebenescr Ozvcn, private Mass. Militia; great"-grandson of Joshua 
Cushman, private, Warren's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE ELIOT RICHARDSON, Boston, Mass. (8612). (Supplemental.) Son 
of Edward and Mercy (Owen) Richardson; grandson of John and Mercy 
(Cushman) Owen; great-grandson of Josliua Cushman, private, Warren's Mass. 
Regt. 

EDWIN PARKER ROBBINS, San Francisco, Cal. (Mass. 20465). Son of Frank 
and Kathcrine A. (Kavanagh) Bobbins; grandson of Edwin and Ellen S. 
(Daniels) Bobbins; great-grandson of Nathan and Eliza Eleanor (L'arker) 
Bobbins; great--grandson of Robert and Elizabeth (Simonds) l'arker; great 3 - 
grandson of Jolm Parker, Captain of Minute Men at Lexington, April 19, 1775. 

GEORGE LYMAN ROGERS, Boston, Mass. (20220). Son of George II. and 
Martha A. (Stuart) Rogers; grandson of John and Abigail (Stevens) Stuart; 
great-grandson of Daniel Stuart, private, Colonel Patterson's Regt." Mass. Con- 
tinental Line; grandson of Jacob and Hannah (Kelly) Rogers; great-grandson 
of Silas Rogers, private, Capt. James Tisdale's Company, Third Mass. Regt. 

JACOB CROWNINSIIILLD ROGERS, New York, N. Y. (Mass. 853O. (Amended.) 
Son of Arthur S. and Annie R. (Nichols) Rogers; grandson of Richard S. and 
Sarah (Crowninshield) Rogers; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Abigail (Dodge) 
Rogers; great J -grandson of Abraham Dodge, Captain, Col. Moses Little's Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES WILLIE SEAGER, Pittsfield, Mass. (20739)- Son of Charles Wesley 
and Sophia E. (Goodenough) Seager; grandson of Sylvanus and Nancy 
(Walker) Seager; great-grandson of Isaac Seager; great--grandson of LUijali 
Seager or Segcr, private, Col. Samuel Wylly's Third Regt. Conn. Line. 

HENRY MORSE SEAVER, Pittsfield, Mass. (19976). Son of Charles Morse and 
Susan (Ilibbard) Scavcr; grandson of Joshua and Emeline (Morse) Seaver; 
great-grandson of Joshua and Nancy (Sumner) Seaver; grcat 2 -grandson of 
Cletncnt Sumner, private, Robinson's, Yose's, and Gill's Mass. Regts. 

CHARLES SUMNER SHAW, Pittsfield, Mass. (20455)- Son of Albert W. and 
Harriet L. lb (Sumner) Shaw; grandson of Charles A. anil Harriet Lyon 
(Barker) Sumner; great-grandson of Gardner T. and Harriet (Lyon; Barker; 
great 2 -grandson of John Darker, private, Capt. David Wheeler's Company, Col. 
John Brown's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of John J. yon, private, Capt. 
Ebenczer Ncwcll's" Company, Colonel Symond's Mass. Regt. 

ARTHUR HATHAWAY SHIRLEY, Lynn, Mass. (199H6). Son of John Blaney 
and Julia Hathaway (Goss) Shirley; grandson of George Peahody and Eliza 
(Hathaway) Goss; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Anna (Gardner) Hathaway; 



great--grandson of Benjamin Gardner, Captain, Col. Rufus Putnam's Mass. 
Regt. 
ADDISON HENRY SMITH, West Springfield, Mass. (16561). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Joseph Addison and Frances Olcott (Mather) Smith; grand m 61 
Horace and Grata (Bagg) Smith; great-grandson of Oliver and Tryphena 
(Day) Bagg; great 2 -grandson of Joel Day, private, Capt. Enoch Chapin's Com- 
pany at Lexington Alarm, and other service. 



262 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

RALPH MANSON SMITH, Beverly, Mass. (20727). Son of Benjamin M. and 
Mary E. (Grindal) Smith; grandson of John and Mary (Mudgett) Smith, Jr.; 
great-grandson of John Smith, private New Hampshire Militia; grandson of 
John L. and Nancy (Wight) Grindal; great-grandson of John Wight, private, 
Matross and Quarter Gunner Mass. Sea Coast Guard; grcat--grandson of 
Christopher Smith, private, Col. Jonathan Chase's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SPINNEY, Lynn, Mass. (10978). Son of Benjamin and 
Mary Beebe (Sever) Spinney; grandson of Benjamin and Martha (Ncwhall) 
Spinney; great-grandson of William NcivliaU, Sergeant, Second Lynn Company 
Mass. Militia; grandson of Nathan and Rebecca (Leonard) Sever; great-grand- 
son of Nathaniel Leonard, Colonel Mass. Militia. 

FRANK CASWELL SPINNEY, Lynn, Mass. (19977). Son of Benjamin Franklin 
and Sarah Stetson (Caswell) Spinney; grandson of Samuel and Nancy^ 
(Leonard) Caswell; great-grandson of Samuel Caswell, private, Ebenezer 
Francis's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Nathaniel Leonard, Jr., Sergeant Mass. 
troops, pensioned; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Leonard, Colonel Mass. troops; 
grandson of Benjamin and Mary Beebe (Sever) Spinney; great-grandson of 
Benjamin and Martha (Ncwhall) Spinney; great 2 -grandson of William Nezvhall, 
Sergeant Mass. Militia; grcat 2 -grandson of William Sever, Adjutant, John 
Hathaway's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE EVERETT SPRAGUE, Lynn, Mass. (19392). (Supplemental.) Son of 
Charles Otis and Mary Elizabeth (Morrill) Spraguc; grandson of Oliver and 
Mary (Veasey) Morrill; great-grandson of Benjamin and Betsey Veascy; 
great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Veascy, private, Col. Stephen Evans's New Hamp- 
shire Regt.; grandson of Benjamin and Susan Evalina (Ireson) Sprague; 
great-grandson of John and Eliza (Bulfinch) Ireson, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of 
Jeremiah and Rebecca (Johnson-Cheever) Bulfinch; great 3 -grandson of John 
Bulfinch, Jr., private, Colonel Freeman's Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of 
Orlando Wcntworth and Mary Griffin (Clifford) Morrill; great 2 -grandsori of 
David Clifford, Jr., private, Captain Gray's New Hampshire Company; great'- 
grandson of David Clifford, Sr., private First Company, Third Battalion New 
Hampshire troops; great 2 -grandson of Oliver Morrill, Lieutenant, Col. Stephen 
Evans's New Hampshire Regt. 

HENRY BREED SPRAGUE, Lynn, Mass. (16016). (Supplemental). Son of 
Benjamin and Susan Evalina (Ireson) Sprague; grandson of John and Eliza 
(Bulfinch) Ireson; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Rebecca (Johnson-Cheever) 
Bulfinch; great 2 -grandson of John Bulfinch, Jr., private, Capt. Robert Davis's 
Company, Colonel Freeman's Mass. Regt. 

GEOPGE HARRY STEVENS, Pittsfield, Mass. (20740). Son of Levi A. and 
Ann E. (Isham) Stevens; grandson of Henry and Sarah (Wells) Stevens; 
great-grandson of Joel Stevens, Captain Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia; 
great-grandson of Levi and Sarah (Deming) Wells; great 2 -grandson of Joshua 
Wells, private, Capt. Williams's Conn. Company; grandson of James M. and 
Amanda (Derrick) Isham; great-grandson of Jason llcrrich, private, Colonel 
Sear's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Zcbulon Jlerrich, private, Col. John 
Brooks's Mass. Continental Regt. 

JOHN FLORENCE CLOTHEY STEVENS, Lynn, Mass. (2074O. Son of Rob- 
ert Pierce and Isabella Drayton (Loss) Stevens, Jr.; grandson of Robert 
Pierce and Ruth Ann (Gardner) Stevens; great-grandson of Thomas and Ta- 
bitha (Wooldridgc) Stevens; great 2 -grandson of John Stevens, private, Col. 
John Glover's Twenty-first Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of John Wooldridge, 
private, Col. John Glover's Twenty-first Mass. Regt. 

JOHN MCALLISTER STEVENSON, Jr., San Antonio, Texas (Mass. 20000). Son 
of John McAllister and Ilattie (Cooley) Stevenson; grandson of John Mc- 
Allister and Seraph Huldah (Newton) Stevenson; great-grandson 0; Lphraim 
Holland and Huldah (Chipman) Newton; great--grandson of Marshall Ne:oton, 
private, Colonel Cushing's Mass. Regt., pensioned; grandson of Samuel Mather 



REGISTER 01? NEW MEMBERS 263 

and Almira Louisa (Tillotson) Coolcy; great-grandson of Timothy Mather and 
Content (Chapman) Coolcy; great 2 -grandson of William Coolcy, Captain Fifth 
Regt. Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Chapman, private Fifth Regt. 
Mass. Militia; great--grandson of Timothy Fuller (and Polly Smith) Chipman, 
private, Colonel Brown's and Colonel Ashley's Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of 
Thomas Chip man, private, Capt. Roswell Downing's Company, Col. John Ash- 
ley's Mass. Regt.; grcat 3 -grandson of Stephen Smith, served under Ethan 
! Allen at Ticonderoga. 

LOUIS TILLOTSON STEVENSON, Pittsfield, Mass. (20456). Son of John Mc- 
Allister and Ilattie (Coolcy) Stevenson; grandson of John McAllister and 
Seraph Huldah (Newton) Stevenson; great-grandson of Ephraim Holland and 
Huldah (Chipman) Newton; great 2 -grandson of Marshall Newton, private, 
Colonel Cushing's Mass. Regt., pensioned; great-'-grandson of Timothy Fuller 
(and Polly Smith) Chipman, private, Colonel Brown's and Colonel Ashley's 
Mass. Regts.; great 3 -grandson of Thomas Chipman, private, Capt. Roswell 
Downing's Company, Col. John Ashley's Mass. Regt.; grcat 3 -grandson of 
Stephen Smith, served under Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga; grandson of Samuel 
Mather and Almira Louisa (Tillotson) Coolcy; great-grandson of Timothy- 
Mather and Content (Chapman) Cooley; great 2 -grandson of William Cooley", 
! Captain of Granville Company Fifth Regt. Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of 

Isaac Chapman/ private Fifth Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOHN RUDDOCK STORY, Lynn, Mass. (19979). Son of John and Catharine 
Elizabeth (Putnam) Story; grandson of John Ruddock and Judith Story; great- 
grandson of BHsha (and Ruth Ruddock) Story, Surgeon, Little's Mass. Regt.; 
great 2 -grandson of John Ruddock, Field Commissary of Military Stores, Con- 
tinental Army. 

THEODORE CHARLES TEBBETTS, Lynn, Mass. (20728). Son of Charles 
Barker and Georgianna Beaumont (May) Tebbetts; grandson of Judge Noah 
and Mary Esther (Woodman) Tebbetts; great-grandson of Jeremiah Hall and 
Sarah (Chase) Woodman; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Woodman, patriot preacher 
at Sanbornton, N. H., signer of Test Declaration. 

EUGENE CHARLES UPTON, Maiden, Mass. (20742). Son of Charles and 
Anna Clementine (Fairbanks) Upton; grandson of Ebenezer and Eleanor C. 
(Farnsworth) Fairbanks; great-grandson of Asa Fairbanks, private, Col. John 
Jacobs's Mass. Regt. 

THOMAS BEALE WALES, Wellesley Hills, Mass. (20466). Son of Thomas 
Beale and Maria (Howe) Wales; grandson of Thomas Beale and Ann (Bcalc) 
Wales; great-grandson of Ephraim Wales, private, Capt. Seth Turner's Com- 
pany, Col. Benjamin Lincoln's Mass. Regt., and Member Braintrce, Mass., 
Committee of Safety. 

JOHN GERRY WARNER, Lynn, Mass. (19002). (Supplemental.) Son of John 
Gerry and Eliza (Newhall) Warner; grandson of Francis Stewart and Lydia 
(Burrill) Newhall; great-grandson of Winthrop and Elizabeth (Farrington) 
Newhall; grcat 2 -grandson of William Farrington, Captain Mass. Militia. 

STEWART GERRY WARNER, Lynn, Mass. (19987). Son of John Gerry and 
Ellen Louisa (Kcttell) Warner; grandson of John Gerry and Eliza (Newhall) 
Warner; great-grandson of Francis Stewart and Lydia (Burrill) Newhall; 
great 2 -grandson of Winthrop and Elizabeth (Farrington) Newhall; great 3 -grand- 
son of William Farrington, Captain Second Lynn Company Mass. Militia; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Thompson and Lydia (Quiver) Burrill; great 3 -grandson of 
John Burrill, Sergeant Second Lynn Company Mass. Militia; great-grandson 
of Ebenezer Burrill, private Mass. Militia, Member of Committee of Safety; 
great 3 -grandson of John Quiver, private, Colonel Glover's Mass. Regt. 
JOHN BROADFIELD WARREN, Cambridge, Mass. (20729). Son of Samuel 
Mills and Sarah Ann (Broadficld) Warren; grandson of Jesse and Betsey 
(Jackson) Warren; great-grandson of Jeduthan Warren, private, Capt. John 
Ford's Company, Colonel Reed's Regt. Mass. Militia. 



204 



SONS OK THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



JOHN FRANK WILLIAM'S, Maiden, Mass. (20730). Son of Henry Lawrence and 
Susan Augusta (Ingalls) Williams; grandson of John and Philena (Freeman) 
Williams; great-grandson of David and Eunice (Crandall) Williams; prcat 2 - 
grandson of Silas Williams, private, Colonel Sheldon's Cam. Regt. 
I WILBUR LARKIN WOODBURY, Swampscott, Mass. (20467). Son of Charles 

Albert and Elizabeth Ellen (Martin) Woodbury; grandson of Thomas and 
Elizabeth Dennis (Symonds) Martin; great-grandson of Daniel and Rebecca 
(Elkins) Symonds; grcat 2 -grandson of Tlw>nas Elkins, Sergeant, Col. John 
Clover's Twenty-first Mass. Regt., and Commander Schooner "Spring Bird." 

WILLIAM HENRY WORCESTER, Lowell, Mass. (20731). Son of William and 
Hannah Chubuck (Thompson) Worcester; grandson of Ebcnezer and .Mary 
(Punchard) Worcester; great-grandson of Noah Worcester-, Captain New 
Hampshire Militia. 

JAMES GRANVILLE YOUNG, Jr., Boston, Mass. (20457). Son of Tames Gran- 
ville and Julia Ann (Adams) Young; grandson of Samuel Adams, Surgeon 
Eighteenth Continental Infantry and Third Continental Artillery. 

MICH I CAM SOCIETY. 

JOHN PARSHALL ANTISDEL, Detroit, Mich. (19898). Son of John Francis 

and Sarah Jane (I'arshall) Antisdel; grandson of John and Frcelove (Spink) 
Antisdel; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Waters) Antisdel; great 2 - 
grandson of Simon Antisdel (Antisnl or Antiele), private, Colonel Walbridge's 
and Colonel Derrick's Resets. Vermont Militia; grandson of Joseph and Clarissa 
(Moon) I'arshall; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth (Todd) I'arshall;' 
grcal 3 -grandson of Jonathan Parshall, private Second Ulster County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

EDWARD A. BANCKER, Jackson, Mich. (19897). Son of Enoch and Lucy 
(White) Bancker; grandson of Floris V. T. and Maria Bancker; great-grandson 
of William and Sinea' Bancker; great 2 -grandson of Floris Bancker, Major Sixth 
Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

WILLIAMS I,. BARNES, Ionia, Mich. (20613). Son of Horace B. and Maryctte 
(Lincoln) Barnes; grandson of William B. and Anthy P. (Arnold) Lincoln; 
great-grandson of Oliver and Susan (Barnes) Arnold; great--grandson of Job 
Arnold, private, Colonel Aldridgc's and other Rhode Island Rests., pensioned. 

CLIFFORD C. BOONE, Detroit, M.ich. (20612). Son of Camellus S. and Eliza 
(Carman) Boone; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth P, Boone; great-grandson 
of Thomas Boone, private Tenth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

JAMES BURTON BOYCE, Lansing, Mich. (20617). Son of John and Priscilla 
Rider (Vining) Boycc; grandson of Scott and Priscilla (Burton) Yining; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Anna (Belden) Burton; great--grandson of 
Josiah Burton, private, Col. Seth Warner's Vermont Regt. 

JAMES COOK, Jackson, Mich. (20604). Son of Zaeharias and Susan H. (Knight) 
Cook; grandson of Benjamin and Nancy (Nare) Cook; great-grandson of John 
Cook (Johannes Koch), private, Capt. Andrew Dillenbock's Company of New 
York Minute Men. 

RUSSELL YALE COOKE, Detroit, Mich. (20601). Son of George Germain and 
Sarah (Patterson) Cooke; grandson of James lienry and Mary Elizabeth 
(Germain) Cooke; great-grandson of Henry and Laura (Dowd) Cooke; great 2 - 
grandson of Charles and Sylvia (Vale) Cooke; great :, -grandso n of Ambrose 
Cool:, private, Capt. Isaac Cook's Militia Company of Wallingford, Com'..; 
great 4 -grandson of Isaac Cook, Captain Connecticut Militia; great 3 -grandson of 
F.lihu Yale, Sergeant, Capt. Abraham Stanley's Company, Col. Thaddeus's 
Conn. Regt. 

HARRY BERT CROWE, Detroit, Mich. (198S3). Son of William Harvey and 
Jennie (Join-) Crowl; grandson of Samuel II. and Harriet (Crabb) Crowl; 
great-grandson of John and Fannie (Johnson) Crab!); great'-'-grandson of Rufus 
Johnson, Lieutenant New York troops, pensioned. 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS 26s 

HARRY BOYD EARHART, Detroit, Mich. (2061 1). Son of Joseph and Mar- 
garet (Boyd) Earhart; grandson of David and Catharine (Altman) Earhart; 
great-grandson of Anthony and Elizabeth (Uric) Earhart; great 2 -grandson of 
John Earhart, private Tenth Regt. Pinna. Continental Line; grandson of John 
and Nancy (Morrison) Boyd; great-grandson of Tames- and Isabel (Craig) 
Boyd; g.reat 2 -grandson of John Craig, First Lieutenant Ninth Regt. Penna. 
Continental Line, and Light Horse Brigade. 

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN GREGG, Calumet, Mich. (19881). Son of 
Thomas and Helen R. (Kinrie) Gregg; grandson of Kcnas and Martha (Fuller) 
Kinnc; great-grandson of Asa Kinne, Captain Conn. Militia, widow pensioned. 

WILLIAM" POST HOLLIDAY, Detroit, Mich. (19884). Son of William and 
Fanny Eunice (Post) Holliday; grandson of Joseph and Clarissa Fowler (Wil- 
cox) Post, Jr.; great-grandson of Joseph Post, private Conn. Line. 

ARTHUR L. HOLMES, Detroit, Mich. (20605). Son of Oscar F. and Nellie XI. 
(Fitzgibbon) Holmes; grandson of EKsha and Irene (Andrus) Holmes; great- 
grandson of Arthur and Mary (Ingraham) Andrus; great 2 -grandson of Eleazer 
Andrus, private, Capt. Aaron Rowley's Company, Colonel Brown's Berkshire 
County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES ANDREW RANTER, Detroit, Mich. (19899)- Son of Henry Louis 
and Marie (Carmichael) Ranter; grandson of Edward and Fanny Rebecca 
(Granger) Ranter; great-grandson of Lyman and Achsah (Wells) Granger; 
great 2 -grandson of Henry and Rebecca (Collins) Wells; great 3 -grandson of 
Joseph Wells, Captain Sixteenth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

CHARLES E. RANTER, Detroit, Mich. (19895). Son of Edward and Fanny R. 
Ranter; grandson of Lyman and Achsah (Wells) Granger; great-grandson of 
Henry and Rebecca (Collins) Wells; great--grandson of Joseph Wells, -Captain 
Sixteenth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

CLAIM- NCR EUGENE KELSO, Manistique, Mich. (19S90). Son of Stephen 
Bloomer and Sarah Jane (Thompson) Kelso; grandson of James Balch and 
Malvina (Hudiburgh) Kelso; great-grandson of Alexander Kelso, private, 
Richardson's South Carolina and Shelby's and Sevier's North Carolina Regis., 
pensioned. 

IIERSCHEL BOUTON LAZF.LL, Lansing, Mich. (19892). Son of Levi and 
Betsey Eveline (Bouton) Lazell; grandson of Levi and Rachel (Stafford') 
Lazell; great-grandson of Daniel' and Nancy (Croacher) Stafford; great-grand- 
son of Daniel Stafford, Ensign, Col. Joseph Noyes's Rhode Island Regt.; grand- 
son of Aaron and Maria (.Nichols) Bouton; great-grandson of Eliasaph and Mary 
(Slauson) Ronton; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Bouton, private, Colonel 
Crane's Westchester County Regt. New York Militia; great--grandson of 
Israel Slaitso>i-, private, Captain Scholield's Company Conn. Militia; gnat- 
grandson of Truman Walker and Elizabeth (McMitchell) Nichols; ereat 3 - 
grandson of David Nichols, private, Col. Benjamin Symond's Berkshire County 
Regt. Mass. .Militia; great 2 -grandson of James MeMuchell, private, Fifteenth 
Mass. Regt. of Foot. 

SIDNEY COOK McLOUTII, Marine City, Mich. (19893). ' Son of Cyrus and 
Mary (Cook) McLoulh; grandson of Peter McLouth, privateer on Mass. 
schooner "Black Snake" ami sloop of war "Providence," private, Colonel 
Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 

WALTER PORT.ER MANTON, Detroit, Mich. (19S82); Son of Walter Uarllett 
and Helena Augusta (Stevens) Manion; grandson of Joseph and XIary (Whip- 
ple) Manton; great-grandson of Edward and Catherine (Abrason) XI an ton; 
great--g rand son of Daniel Manton, Lieutenant-Colonel, "Captain General's 
Rhode Island Cavalier ." 

ALFRED FOOTE MAYNARD, Chicago, Til. (Mich. ^87). Son of Matthew FI. 
and XIary E. (Foot) Maynard; grandson of Ulric and Olive (Branch) 
nard; great-grandson of Gardner and Phcbe (Ross) Maynard; grcat'-'-grandson 
of Gardner Maynard, Corporal Ma i. Militia. 



266 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

EDWIN LILLIE MILLER, Detroit, Mich. (20615). Son of Robert and Mary 
(Lihic) Miller; grandson of Edwin and Eois (Townsend) Eillie; great-grand- 
son of Daniel and Azuba (Long) Eillic; grcat 2 -grandson of David Lillie, En- 
sign Eighth Company, Seventh Conn. Regt. 

JOHN LYMAN CLARK MULKEY, Detroit, Mich. (19888). Son of John M. and 
Emma G. (Snell) Mulkey ; grandson of William Fletcher and Mancrva A. 
(Thompson) Mulkey; great-grandson of John Milton and Matilda (Scantlin) 
Mulkey; great 2 -grandson of Philip and Ruth (Odle) Mulkey; great 3 -grandson 
of Jonathan (and daughter of Obadiah Howard) Mulkey; great 4 -grandson of 
Phillip Mulkey, Chaplain and private North Carolina Militia. 

HOMER EhESWORTII PARSHAEE, Detroit, Mich. (20606). Son of James and 
Caroline (Finney) I'arshall; grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) Par- 
shall; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth (Todd) Parshall; greats-grandson 
of Jonathan Parshall, private Second Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

FREDERICK TAPPAN RANNEY, Detroit, Mich. (19S9O. Son of Frederick 
Thomas and Frances Antill (Rates) Ranney; grandson of Samuel and Polly 
(Stewart) Ranney; great-grandson of George and Esther (Hall) Ranney; great a - 
grandson of Samuel Halt, Captain, First Company, Backus's Regt. Conn. Right 
Horse. 

WIEEIAM PEYTON SMITH, Detroit, Mich. (20614). Son of James Franklin 
and Emily (Edwards) Smith; grandson of Haden II. and Susan M. (Forbes) 
Edwards; great-grandson of Haden II. and Susan (Beall) Edwards; great 2 - 
grandson of John Edzvards, Member of State Legislature of Kentucky, 17S1- 
1785. 

EDWARD ORR STAFFORD, Marquette, Mich. (20607). Son of Henry Hinckley 
and Catherine Lewis (Kidder) Stafford; grandson of L^ander and MrhitaMe 
(Hinckley) Stafford; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Temperance (Lewis) 
Eothrop, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Lothrop, Captain, Colonel Freeman's 
Barnstable County Mass. Regt. 

ARTHUR ERWIN STEVENS, Detroit, Mich. (10896). Son of John and Mary 
(Covert) Stevens; grandson of Joseph and Abigail (Knowlton) Stevens; great- 
grandson of Joseph Stevens, Corporal Thirteenth Albany County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

JOHN HOWARD SWIFT, Detroit, Mich. (19894)- Son of Robert Zephaniah and 
Amarilla Tuttlc (Chambcrlin) Swift; grandson of Cyrus and Adelina (Gillette) 
Chamberlin; great-grandson of EHphas and Amarilla (Sanford) Gillette; great'- 
grandson of Jairus Sanford, private Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Benoni 
Gillette, private Tenth Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

WALTER THOMPSON, Detroit, Mich. (20603). Son of James Wilfred and 
Emily Eliza (Walter) Thompson; grandson of James A. and Eliza Soulird 
(Edwards) Walter; great-grandson of Abraham and Ruth Fcssenden (Hunt) 
Edwards; grcat 2 -grandson of Thomas Hunt, Captain, Col. Henry Jackson's 
Mass. Regt. 

WILFRED STUART THOMPSON, Detroit, Mich. (19900). Son of James Wil- 
fred and Cora (Calkins) Thompson; grandson of Charles Pliido and Mary Ann 
(Hinsdale) Calkins; great-grandson of Hiram and Roxalany (Walbridgc) 
Hinsdale; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Hinsdale, Ensign Second Regt. Vermont 
Militia. 

WILL ALLEN WAITE, Detroit, Mich. (20616). Son of Waldo Flint and Har- 
riet (Allen) Waite; grandson of Elmer and Betsey (Warner) Wait; great- 
grandson of Asa Wait, Sergeant Eighth Regt. Mass. Light Infantry. 

WILLIAM J. WEAVER, Detroit, Mich. (19889). Son of Tori D. and Anna A. 
(Caton) Weaver; grandson of Vaughan and Lydia (Nilcs) Weaver; great- 
grandson of Joseph Wearer, Captain Rhode Island troops. 

FRANK WELTON, Grand Rapids, Mich. (20609). Son of Flavins A. and Ella 
M. Fisk; grandson of Channeey Rose and Louisa (Doud) Welton; great- 
grandson of Alfred Thomas and Samantha (Miller) Welton; great-grandson 
of Stephen Welton, Jr., Sergeant Tenth Regt. Connecticut Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 267 

HENRY WHITING, St. Clair, Mich. (20603). Son of Henry and Mary Throop 
(Rice) Whiting; grandson of John and Anna (Carter) Whiting; great-grand- 
son of Timothy Whiting, Minute Man at Lexington Alarm and Major, Ass't 
Commissary, Twelfth Mass. Regt. ; great 2 -grandson of Timothy Whiting, -Ser- 
geant, Colonel Bridge's Regt. Mass. Minute Men; great-grandson of Joseph 
Carter, Member of Commissary Committee of Lancaster, Mass.; grandson of 
Justin and Mary (Throop) Rice; great-grandson of Jabcz West and Pamelia 
(West) Throop; grcat-'-grandson of Elias .West, Lieutenant, Captain Water- 
man's Conn. Company New Haven Alarm. 

MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

ROBERT ALT/EN CONE, Minneapolis, Minn. (19939). Son of Robert D. and 
Catharine (Allen) Cone; grandson of Robert Cephas and Mary (Pratt) Cone; 
great-grandson of "Jonathan and Abigail Cleveland (Usher) Cone; grcal 2 - 
grandson of Cephas Cone, private, Capt. Eliphalet Holmes's Company Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Moses O. and Catherine (Burns) Allen; great-grandson 
of Moses and Jemima C. (Paddock) Allen; great 2 -grandson of Solomon Allen, 
private Second Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

EEWOOD SPENCER CORSER, Minneapolis, Minn. (3283). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Caleb Burbank and Henrietta Laura (Spencer) Corser; grandson of 
Austin and Polly (Elwood) Spencer; great-grandson of Timothy Spencer, pri- 
vate East Haddam Conn. Militia, Lexington Alarm list. 

FRED ABBOTT CUTLER, Minneapolis, Minn. (18.152). (Supplemental.) Son 
of Jonathan and Loretta E. (Abbott) Cutler; grandson of Hart Balch and 
Elizabeth (Moore) Abbott; great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Leonard) 
Moore; great--grandson of Jonas Leonard, private, Lieutenant Colonel Wil- 
liams's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Samuel and Ruth (Phillips) Cutler; great- 
grandson of Jonathan and Lydia (Waldron) Cutler, Jr.; great--grandson of 
Jonathan Cutler, Sr., private, Capt. David Chadwick's Mass. Company. 

BERTRAM GRANDAGE DICKINSON, Minneapolis, Minn. 09935)- Son of 
Charles Edgar and Ida Virginia (Steiner) Dickinson; grandson of John Allen 
and Harriet (Frease) Dickinson; great-grandson of John and Bathsheba (lies- 
ton) Dickinson; great 2 -grandson- of Edward Warner Heston, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Pennsylvania Militia. 

CHARLES WAYLAND DREW, Minneapolis, Minn. (10034)- Son of Homer 
Cassius and Lorinda (Roby) Drew; grandson of Elisha and Sarah (Farns- 
worth) Drew; great-grandson of Reuben Eamsworth, private, Col. Ira Allen's 
and other Vermont Regts. 

CHARLES WAYLAND DREW, Minneapolis, Minn. (19934). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Homer Cassius and Lorinda (Roby) Drew; grandson of Ebenezer and 
Mehitable (Taplin) Roby; great-grandson of Elisha (and Martha Newton) Tap- 
tin, private, Colonel Whitney's and other Mass. Regts.; grcat 2 -grandson of 
Seth Newton, Captain Eighth Company, Sixth Worcester County Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

EDWARD WARBURTON DURANT, Charleston, So. Car. (Minn. 19932). Son 
of Edward White and Henrietta (Pease) Durant; grandson of William Win- 
throp and Susamma Lincoln (Marsh) Durant; great-grandson of Jackson and 
Dorcas (Fuller) Durant; grcat 2 -grandson of Edward and Mary (Peck) Durant; 
greats-grandson of Edward Durant, Chairman Committee of Correspondence 
and Delegate to Provincial Congress at Concord, Mass.; great--grandson of 
Edivard Fuller, Captain Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM ALBERT FRENCH, St. Paul, Minn. (19926). Son of Phiueas Mundy 
and Sarah J. (Lees) French; grandson of David and Margaret (Noc) French; 
great-grandson of David French, Sr., Minute Mian New Jersey Militia; great- 
grandson of Fonts Noe, private Hunterdon County New Jersey Militia and 
Line. 



268 SONS OE Till-; AMERICAN INVOLUTION 

THOMAS COULD, St. Paul, Minn. (1912.5). Son of Thomas and Marti. a Maria 
(Tufts) Gould; grandson of Thomas and Pamclia (Waitt-Andrews) Gould; 
great-grand on of Thomas and Hannah (Hill) Gould; grcat 2 -grandson of Jacob 
Could, private, Captain Spraguc's Company Mass. Militia. 

DEAN BRADISII GREGG, St. Paul, Minn. (19943). Son of Jesse Ashton and 
Ella (Bradish) Gregg; grandson of Cephas and Mary (Newton) Gregg; great- 
grandson of Ivnos Wood and Sarah (Work) Newton; grcat 2 -grandson of 
David Newton, private, Col. John Wood's Vermont Rcgt. 

WILLIAM HENRY IIOULTON, Elk River, Minn. (19929). Son of Samuel and 
Sarah (Kendall) lloulton; grandson of Joseph and -Sarah (Putnam) Houlton; 
great-grandson of Amos Putnam, private, Colonel Ruggles's "Mass. Rcgt. 

ARTHUR EUGENE JOHNSON, Minneapolis, Minn. (19336). Son of Joseph 
Henry and Louise (Lyon) Johnson; grandson of Walter and Maria Antoi- 
nette (Giddings) Lyon; great-grandson of Tames and Lucy (Derning) Gid- 
dings; great 2 -grandson of Jabcs Boning, Captain Conn. Militia. 

ARTHUR HENRY KENNEDY, Minneapolis, Minn. (19938). Son of Henry A. 
and Annie (Lewis) Kennedy; grandson of Danid K. and Elizabeth Ann (Reed) 
Kennedy; great-grandson of William Maxwell and Rosanna (McEarland) 
Reed; great 2 -grandson of Paul (and Margery Beath) Reed, Commander of 
Privateer ."Warren"; great 3 -grandson of John Beath, Naval Ofhecr for Port 
of Townsend, Maine; great 2 -grandson of Andrew McFarland, Captain Fourth 
Company, Colonel Jones's Second Boothbay, Maine, Kegt.; grandson of Allen 
and Emeline (Ilodgdon) Lewis; great-grandson of Thomas and Thankful 
(Greenleaf) Ilodgdon; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin and Betsy (Tyler) Ilodg- 
don; grcat 3 -grandson of Caleb Ilodgdon, private, Col. Samuel McCpbbs' Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES SUMNER MARDEN, Barnesvillc, Minn. (19944). Son oi Riley Hull 
and Emily (Clifford) Marden ; grandson of Joseph A. and Lucy W. (Annis) 
Marden; great-grandson of Edward and Elizabeth (Annis) Mardcn, -Jr.; great 3 - 
grandson of Edward Marden, private, Col. Henry Dearborn's New Hampshire 
Regt., pensioned. 

BYRON J. MOSIER, Stillwater, Minn. (19933). Son of Murwin Z. and Sopronia 
(Robbins) Mosier; grandson of Joseph and Mary Ann (Curtis) Mosier; great- 
grandson of Joseph Mosier, private Twelfth Albany County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

WALTER KIMBALL NEAL, St. Tames, Minn. (i9937). Son of William Henry 
and Sophronia (Thompson) Neal; grandson of David and Mary Newell 
(Southwick) Neal; great-grandson of George and Mary (Lakeman) South- 
wick; great 2 -grandson of George Southzvick, private Mass. Militia, killed at 
Lexington, April 19, 1775; grandson of Hiram and Eliza Jane (Ilutchins) 
Kimball; great-grandson of Simeon and Polly Kimball; great-grandson oi 
Reuben ICitnball, Captain, Colonel Stickncy's New Hampshire Regt. 

CHARLES THOMAS OZMUN, Chicago, 111. (Minn. 19941). Son of Abraham 
and Maria (Sehcnck) Ozmtin; grandson of Isaac and Jennie (Van Wagner) 
Schenck; great-grandson of John Schenck, Captain New Jersey Continental 
troops. 

FERNANDO W. ROOT, St. Paul, Minn. (19942). Son of Silas and Matilda A. 
(Cole) Moot; grandson of Bbcncscr (and Cynthia Whipple) Root, private, Col. 
John Brown's and other Mass. Regts., pensioned; great-grandson of Benjamin 
Whipple, Jr., private, Capt. Samuel Robinson's Company Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES PEARS ALL- SCIIOUTEN, Minneapolis, Minn. (19940). Son of John 

William and Mary (Pearsall) Schouten; grandson of Lewis and Harriet (Hus- 
tis) Pearsall; great-grandson of George and Charity (Parmaley) Pear-all; 
grcat'--grandson of George and ITcpscbeth (Annncrman) Pearsall; great 3 - 
grandson of Derrick Ammcrman, private, Colonel Van Cortlandt's ami other 
New York Rcgts., pensioned. 






REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 269 

SYDNEY OLMSTEAD SNYDER, Minneapolis, Minn. (19928). Son of James E. 
and Effe Ifnogene (Hall) Snyder; grandson of William Alexander and Lucy 
Jane (McMillan) Hall; great-grandson of Andrew and Effe D. (Wheeler) Mc- 
Millan; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Wheeler, private First Battalion Philadel- 
phia County Militia. 

LLOYD GARRISON SPERRY, Milaca, Minn. (19930). Son of Anson Martin 
and Thirza (Garrison) Sperry; grandson of Bcla Jarvis and Matilda (Dow) 
Sperry; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Martha (Buzwell) Dow; great 9 - 
grandson of Nathaniel Dow, private Tenth New Hampshire Continental Regt. 

JOHN 1 C. STALKY, St. Paul, Minn. (19927). Son of Jacob and Mary (Myers) 
Staley; grandson of John Myers, private Fifth Regt. Virginia Militia. 

JOHN C. STALEY, Jr., St. Paul, Minn. (19931). Son of John C. and Mary 
(Tucker) Staley; grandson of Jacob and Mary (Myers) Staley; great-grandson 
of John Myers, private Fifth Regt. Virginia Militia. 

MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON BARNES, Jr., St. Louis, Mo. (15125). Son of Thomas 
Jefferson and Mary (Mason) Barnes; grandson of Samuel and Nancy (Rice) 
Barnes; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Boydston) Barnes; great 2 - 
grandson of Jbhn Barnes, First Lieutenant Seventh Virginia Regt. 

CHARLES WALTER HUGHES, St. Louis, Mo. (20701). Son of Joshua Wells 
and Almira Louise (Martin) Hughes; grandson of Richard and Nancy (Davis) 
Hughes; great-grandson of Richard Hughes, private Pennsylvania Line. 

PHILIP CONNOR KIDD, St. Louis, Mo. (15124). Son of Phillip Connor and 
Lelia (Major) Kidd; grandson of Benjamin Randolph and Sallie Forgis (Left- 
wich) Major; great-grandson of William Bur well and Sarah (Smith) Left- 
wich; great--grandson of Augustus Lefhvich, Jr., Captain, Col. William Trigg's 
Regt. Virginia Militia-; great-grandson of James and Betsey (Minter) Major; 
great 2: grandson of John Major, private Second Regt. Virginia troops; greal 2 - 
grandson of Reuben Smith, private, Col. William Heth's Regt. Virginia Militia, 
pensioned; great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Jane (Trabue) Minter; greats-grand- 
son of John James Trabue, Ensign Virginia Militia. 

HENRY JOSEPH SCHERCK, St. Louis, Mo. (15123). Son of Isaac and Esther 
(Marks) Scherck; grandson of Joseph 11. and Cecilc (Abrams) Marks; great- 
grandson of Alexander and Esther (Hart) Marks; great 2 -grandson of David 
Jlart, Third Sergeant York County Penna. Militia. 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

ALDEN J. BENNETT, Virginia City, Mont. (18155). Son of Phineas L. and 
Minerva (Hakes) Bennett; grandson of Lyman and Nancy (Dayton) Hakes; 
great-grandson of Lyman and Abiali (Mathews) Dayton; great'-'-grandson of 
Michael Dayton, Captain Seventh Company, Tenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

NEBRASKA SOCIFTY. 

GEORGE FRANKLIN BIDWELL, Omaha, Neb. (19241). Son of George Harvey 
and Alary Elizabeth (Moses) Bidwell; grandson of Darius and Sodcma (Hoi- 
comb) Moses; great-grandson of Darius Moses, private, Colonel Hooker's 
Conn. Regt; great J -grandson of Aaron Moses, Lieutenant Conn, troops. 

VICTOR FREMONT CLARK, Neligh, Neb. (192.(3). Son of F.liphalet L. and 
Nancy (Munger) Clark; grandson of Augustus and Temperance (Babcock) 
Munger; great-grandson of Moses and Mercy (Baker) Munger; great-grand- 
son of Jehicl Munger, Captain, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Mass. Regt. and 
other service. 

CHARLES LEWIS DICKEY, Columbus Neb. (192.10). Son of William )). and 
Frances Ann (Stone) Dickey; grandson of Elijah C. and Mary (Suddcth) 



270 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Stone; great-grandson of Benjamin Stone, Sergeant Second South Carolina 
Regt.; great-grandson of William Dickey, private Eighth Battalion Cumberland 
County Penna. Militia. 

ELMER S. NICKERSON, Gretna, Neb. (19242). Son of Joseph Arnold and 
Margaret Louisa Nickerson; grandson of Joseph and Rosey Nickerson; great- 
grandson of Udzvard Nickerson, private Mass. Militia, Corporal New York 
troops; grcat 2 -grandson of Corel Nickerson, private, Colonel Dike's Mass. Regt. 

IRA WEBSTER PORTER, Omaha, Neb. (192.15). Son of Ira Webster and Abbie 
Samantha (Woodman) Porter; grandson of Ira and Eulalia (Belcher) Porter; 
great-grandson of Isaac and Susanna (Packard) Purler; great 2 -grandson of 
Joseph (and Elizabeth Burrill) Farter, private, Col. Lemuel Robinson's and 
oilier Mass. Rcgts.; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Eulalie (Nash) Belcher; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Belcher, private, Capt. Nathaniel Belcher's Com- 
pany Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Nathaniel Belcher, Captain Fifth Suf- 
folk County and other Mass. Regts.; great 2 -grandson of Moses Nash, Jr., pri- 
vate, Capt. Seth Turner's (Independent) Company Mass. Militia; great-grand- 
son of Samuel Barrel!, private, Col. Solomon Lovell's Mass. Regt.; great-- 
grandson of Reuben Packard, Sergeant, Colonel Bailey's Plymouth County 
Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Archibald and Lydia (Hammond) Woodman; 
great-grandson of John and Lavinia (Todd) Woodman; grcat-'-grandson of 
Thomas Todd, private, Colonel Jackson's Eighth Mass. Regt. and other service. 

THOMAS REYNOLDS PORTER, Omaha, Neb. (19244). Son of Elias and Eliza- 
beth (Richardson) Porter; grandson of Felix Allan and Jane McMurtry 
(Steele) Richardson; great-grandson of Briee and Elizabeth (Thornberry) 
Steele; grcat--grandson of Andreiv Steele, Captain Kentucky Prontiersmen. 

ELLERY HILL WESTERFIELD, Omaha, Neb. (19296). Son of James and 
Fsther (Moore) Westerfield; grandson of Jacob Reeder and Ame Hedges 
(Ayers) Westerfield; great-grandson of Ebenezer Byram and Abigail (Byram) 
Ayers; greal 2 -grandson of Silas Ayers, private, minute man, Morris County 
New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of Naphtali Byram, private New Jersey 
Militia; grandson of John William and Elizabeth Whiting (Mather) Moore; 
great-grandson of Noyes (and Chloe Waterbury) Mather, private, Captain 
Gregory's Company Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Moses Mather, patriot 
preacher, of Darien, Conn., prisoner of war; great 2 -grandson of John Water- 
bury, f,tli, private Stamford- Company Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES MARCUS WILHELM, Omaha, Neb. (19247). Son of Benjamin F. 
and Sanabtha A. (Tonn) Wilhelm; grandson of Marcus S. and Rowcna (Hyde) 
Tonn; great-grandson of Jesse and Mary (Hulbert) Hyde; great 2 -grandson of 
Thomas Hyde, Captain Connecticut Infantry. 



?r 



NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY 



STEPHEN B. COLE, Lakcport, N. H. (19142). Son of John A. and Abigail 
(Davis) Cole; grandson of Isaac and Hannah (Atwood) Cole; great-grandson 
of Solo>non Cole, private New Hampshire .Militia. 

GEORGE STONE COUCH, Lawrence, Mass. (N. II. 19145)- Son of Samuel 
Dana and Hannah (Stone) Couch; grandson of George Stone, private, Col. 
Rufus Putnam's and other Mass. Regts., pensioned. 

GEORGE VERNON HILL, Concord, N. II. (19141). Son of John Moody and 
Mary Adelaide (I.add) Hill; grandson of John F. and Mary M. (Rollins) 
I. add; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Betsey (Morse) Rollins; great-grand- 
son of Elijah and Mary (Prescott) Rollins; great 3 -grandson of Aaron Rollins, 
private, Col. Moses Nichols's New Hampshire Regt. of Volunteers. 

LOUIS C. MERRILL, Concord, N. II. (19143). Son of Henry C. and Diantha II. 
(Patten) Merrill; grandson of Jesse and Lucinda (Evans) Patten; great-grand- 
son of David Patten, private, Colonel Stickney's Regt., Stark's New Hampshire 
Brigade; grcat 2 -grandson of John Patten, private, Colonel Stickney's Regt., 
Stark's New Hampshire Brigade. 









. 









REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS -'/I 

JAMES MINOT, Concord, N. II. (8212). (Supplemental.) Son of Jonas and 
Ann (Bartlett) Minot; grandson of James and Sally (Wilson) Minot; great- 
grandson of Archclaus Wilson, private New Hampshire Militia; grandson ot 
Ichabod Colby and Anna (Sleeper) Bartlett; great-grandson of Peter Sleeper, 
private, Col. David Gilman's New Hampshire Regt. ; great'-'-grandson of David 
Sleeper, private, Colonel Bedel's New Hampshire Regt. 

CHARLES FREDERICK ROBINSON, Milford, N. II. (19136). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Joseph Wadleigh and Frances Eliza (Weld) Robinson; grandson of 
Chase and Sally (Wadleigh) Robinson; great-grandson of Nathaniel Wadleigh, 
private, Colonel Marshall's Tenth Regt. Mass. Continental troops, pensioned. 

DANIEL LYFORD THOMPSON, Tilton, N. II. (19139)- Son of Benjamin 
Brown and Angilcn (Sanborn) Thompson; grandson of William and Hannah 
(Philbrook) Thompson; great-grandson of Moses Thompson, private, Captain 
Aldrich's Company New Hampshire Rangers. 

EDWARD KNIGHT WEBSTER, Concord, N. II. (19144). Son of Eliphalet 
Knight and Emily (Webster) Webster; grandson of Ebenezer and Sarah (Web- 
ster) Webster; great-grandson of Ebenezer Webster, Captain, Col. Moses 
Nichols's Regiment New Hampshire Militia. 

NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

FREDERICK Q. BLANCHARD, East Orange, N. J. (19589). Son of Edward R. 
and Anna (Quincy) Blanchard; grandson of Silas Atkins and Hannah Hol- 
brook (Putnam) Quincy; great-grandson of Mason and Alona (Holbrook") 
Putnam; great 2 -grandson of Reuben Putnam, private, Col. Benjamin Hawes's 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM BOWERS, East Orange, N. J. (19584). Son of Henry and Margaret 
(Hay) Bowers; grandson of John Play, private Northampton County Penna. 
Militia. 

HENRY FREDERICK CLARKE, East Orange, N. J. (20329). Son of Joel C. 
and Betsey (Russell) Clarke; grandson of Hubbard and Polly (Woods) Rus- 
sell; great-grandson of Ilubbcrt, or Hubbard, and Sarah (Warren) Russell; 
greats-grandson of Jason Russell, private Mass. Militia, killed at West Cam- 
bridge, April 19, 1775. 

HERBERT ROYAL CRANE, Newark, N. J. (20340). oon of Charles G. and 
Marie E. (Dickinson) Crane; grandson of William Henry and Mary Jane 
(Gillen) Crane; great-grandson of Josiali and Kcziah Saxton (Sturgis) Crane; 
great--grandson of Benjamin and Pliebe (Allien) Crane; grcat 3 -grandson of 
Josiali Crane, Captain Eastern Battalion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

ANDREW THOMPSON CONNET, Flemington, N. J. (19583). Son of Samuel 
and Hannah (Thompson) Connet; grandson of Andrew and Susannah (T.and) 
Thompson; great-grandson of John and Hannah (Van Syckel) Thompson; 
great L '-grandson of John Thomson, private, Somerset County New Jersey 
Militia. 

JOHN EDWARD COOPER, Cranford, N. J. (19598). Son of Thomas E. and 
Isabella M. Cooper; grandson of John and Elizabeth (llawes) Cooper; great- 
grandson of John Cooper, Lieutenant, Colonel BrinkerhofF's Second New York 
Militia Regt.; great-grandson of Solonwn Plawes (Hares), private, Colonel Van 
Cortlandt's Third Westchester County Regt. New York Militia; great--grandson 
of I'cletiah Hazves, private, Colonel Van Cortlandt's Third Westchester County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

FRANK EDWIN ELWELL, Wccfiawkcn, N. J. (20343)- Son of John Wesley 
and Clara (Farrar) Elwcll; grandson of F.lisha Jones and Elizabeth Bruce 
(Barney) Farrar; great-grandson of Pphraim Farrar, private, Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ADDISON ELY, Rutherford, N. J. (20330). Son of William and Emmcliric (Har- 
rison) Ely; grandson of l\lihu and Grace (Rose) Ely; great-grandson of Levi 
Ply, Captain, Col. John Moselcy's and Col. John Brown's Reg:-. Mass. .Militia. 



272 SONS OF TIIK AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

SANDFORD DANA ELY, Rutherford, N. J. (20332). Son of Addison and Emily 
Jayne (Johnson) Ely; grandson of William and Emmeline (Harrison) Ely; 
great-grandson of EHhu and Grace (Rose) Ely; great 2 -grandson of Levi Ely, 
Captain, Col. John Moselcy's and Col. John Brown's Regts. Mass. Militia. 

SETH HARRISON ELY, Hover, N. J. (20331). Son of Addison and Emily Jayne 
(Johnson) Ely; grandson of William and Emmeline (Harrison) F.ly; great- 
grandson of Elihu and Grace (Rose) Ely; great 2 -grandson of Levi Ely, Cap- 
tain, Col. John Moseley's and Col. John Brown's Regts. Mass. Militia. 

SAMUEE G. GARRETSON, Perth Amboy, N. J. (19597). Son of Garret and 
Cornelia He Hart (Sedam) Garretson; grandson of Rykc Scdam, private New 
Jersey State troops. 

HARVEY JAMES GENUNG, Madison, N. J. (20342). Son of Elias Muchmore 
and Isabella Jordan (Johnson) Genung; grandson of Harvey Clark and Nancy 
(Sturgis) Genung; great-grandson of Calvin and Nancy (Smithson) Genung; 
great 2 -grandson of Anemias Genung, private Morris County New Jersey State 
troops; grandson of James Ilcrvey Johnson; great-grandson of Mahlon John- 
son; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Johnson, private, Arnold's Eight Horse troop. 

FREDERICK FOOTE GEASBY, Elizabeth, N. J. (19590). Son of James and 
Susan (Brown) Glasby; grandson of William Brawn, private Essex County 
Militia and New Jersey State troops. 

JOSEPH FREDERICK GEASBY, Elizabeth, N. J. (20336). Son of Frederick 
Foote and Phoebe 1,. (Davis) Glasby; grandson of James and Susan (Brown) 
Glasby; great-grandson of William Broivn, private Second Essex County Regt. 
New Jersey Militia. 

HENRY DAVID HATFIELD, Newark, N. J. (20344). Son of Henry Elias and 
ITcttie Estelle (Kennedy) Hatfield; grandson of David and Mary Elizabeth 
(Syron) Hatfield; great-grandson of Elias and Catherine (Decker) Hatfield; 
great 2 -grandson of Ephraim and Polly (Lyon) Hatfield; great :! -grandson of 
Aaron Hatfield, First Eieutenant Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

EDWARD PACKARD HOLDEN, Jr., Madison, N. J. (195^). Son of Edward 
Packard and Ella C. (Webb) Holden; grandson of James Cotton and Sarah D. 
(Packard) Holden; great-grandson of Horace and Mary (Cotton) Holden; 
great 2 -grandson of Levi Holden, First Eieutenant Commander-in-Chief's Guard, 
Continental troops. 

HORACE HOLDEN, . Madison, N. J. (19585). Son of Horace and Abby M. 
(Rankin) Holden; grandson of James C. and Sarah D. (Packard) Holden; 
great-grandson of Horace and Mary (Cotton) Holden; great 2 -grandson of Levi 
Holden, First Lieutenant Commander-in-Chief's Guard, Continental troops. 

WILLIS KIRKPATRICK HOWELL, Morristown, N. J. (20335). Son of Ben- 
jamiii Franklin and Frances IE (Willis) Howell; grandson of Thomas C. and 
Deborah (Farrand) Willi-.; great-grandson of Daniel and Phoebe (Plum) Far- 
rand; great 2 -grandson of Be thud Farrand, Eieutenant New Jersey troops, 
widow pensioned. 

JOHN J. EEIDY, Newark, N. J. (19587). Son of George C. and Mary (Jenkins) 
Eeidy; grandson of George and Hester (Hebron) Eeidy; great-grandson of 
Jacob Leidy, First Eieutenant, Col. Daniel Hiester's Fifth Battalion Penna. Line. 

JESSE D. EIPPINCOTT, Newark, N. J. (20341). Son of B. C. and Deborah II. 
(Diverty) Lippincott; grandson of Jesse II. and Elizabeth (Garrison) Diverty; 
great-grandson of William and Deborah (Hand) Garrison; grcat 2 -grandson of 
John Hand, Major New Jersey troops. 

ADOEPIILTS NEWMAN LOCKWOOD, East Orange, N. J. (19502). Son of 
Edmund S. and Mary A. (Newman) Lockwood; grandson of Harvey and 
Elizabeth P. (Raymond) Newman; great-grandson of Enoch Raymond, private 
Westchester County New York Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 273 

JOHN DALE McGILL, Jersey City, N. J. (20338). Son of Alexander T. and 
Eleanor Acheson (McCulloch) McGill; grandson of George and Esther (Tur- 
bctt) McCulloch; great-grandson of Thomas Turbctt, Lieutenant Colonel Fourth 
Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Associators and Militia. 
HENRY J. MILLER, Elizabeth, N. J. (19509)- Son of Ecbbeus B. and Martha 
Frances Miller; grandson of Josiah and Hannah (Ward) Miller; great-grandson 
of Joseph Miller, Sergeant New Jersey Militia and Continental Line. 
GEORGE JOHN MURDOCK, Newark, N. J.' (19594). Son of Chester and Eliza- 
beth (Armstrong) Murdoch; grandson of George and Polly (Youngs) Mur- 
dock; great-grandson of Daniel Murdoch, private Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM WANAMAKER NEILL, Philadelphia, Pa. (N. J. -0326). Son of John 
Scott and Jennie C. Ncill; grandson of William and Charlotte (Scott) Ntill; 

great-grandson of and Sarah (Boyd) Scott; great 2 -grandson of George 

and Sarah (Knott) Boyd; great r, -grandson of David Knott, Member of Com- 
mittee of Observation at Shrewsbury, New Jersey. 

EDWARD ALLEN OSBORNE, Rakewood, N. J. (19596). Son of Howard S. and 
Phebe A. (Meeker) Osborne; grandson of John D. and Pennilia C. (Roll) 
Meeker; great-grandson of Johnathan and Mary (Donman) Meeker; great 2 - 
grandson of Timothy and Sarah (Parcell) 'Meeker; grcat 3 -grandson of Timothy 
Meeker, Sergeant New Jersey State Troops. 

GEORGE CLINTON PAINE, Newark, N. J. (20334). Son of George Clinton and 
Clara (Bateman) Paine; grandson of Brinton Paine, Major Fifth Dutchess, 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

ROBERT L. PARSONS, East Orange, N. J. (20339). Son of Joseph E. and 
Sarah F. (Clark) Parsons; grandson of Stephen and Phoebe (Meeker) Clark; 
great-grandson of Caleb Meeker, fifer New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of 
Joseph- Meeker, Captain New Jersey Militia and Line. 

FRANK SEWELL SKINNER, Westfield, N. J. (i9593). Son of Clark and Nancy 
C. (Sewell) Skinner; grandson of Corsen Clark and Ravina (Scudder) Skinner; 
great-grandson of Richard and Jane (Clark) Skinner; great-grandson of 
Richard Skinner, Captain First Middlesex Regt. New Jersey State Troops; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Badglcy) Scudder; great-'-grandson of 
Robert Badglcy, private First Essex Regt. New Jersey troops; great 2 -grandson 
of John Mersereau Clark, Express Rider. 

BURNHAM COOS STICKNEY, Elizabeth, N. J. (19591). Son of John II. and 
Clara N. (Tucker) Stickney; grandson of John and Elizabeth T, (Stokcll) 
Stickney; great-grandson of Samuel and Martha (Cook) Stickney; great-'-grand- 
son of Jonathan Stickney, Second Lieutenant, Colonel Wade's Mass. Regt. 

EDWARD RICHARD VAN PELT, New Brunswick, N. J. (19588). Son of 
Reuben G. and Sarah Anna (McDonald) Van Pelt; grandson of Richard and 
Alary White (Eastburn) McDonald; great-grandson of George and Sarah (De 
Groot) McDonald; great--grandson of Ttichard McDonald, Major Somerset 
County New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Dc Groot, Captain Somer- 
set County New Jersey Militia. 

MOSIIEIM STECK WATERS, Newark, N. J. (20328). Son of Asa Harris and 
Hannah Catherine (Stock) Waters; grandson of Oren and Juliet (Harris) 
Waters; great-grandson of Asa IValers, private, Col, josiah Whitney's Regt. 
Mass. Militiw. 

WILLIAM FORCtf WHITAKER, Elizabeth, N. J. (19505)- Son of Epher and 
Hannah Maria (Force) Whitaker; grandson of William Burton and Martha 
Ann (Hopping) Force; great-grandson of Thomas Torse, or Force, Corporal 
Second Regt. Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

HERBERT BEVERLY YOUNGLOVE, Elizabeth, N. J. (19600). Son of John 
and Gertrude (Langdon) Younglove; grandson of John and Melissa (Clemens) 
Younglove; great-grandson of Lucas and Rydia (Warren) Younglove; great 8 - 
grandson of John Younglove, Major, Col. Lewis Van Wocrt's Regt. New 
York Militia, pensioned. 

tS 



274 ' ■■ '• /OLU'J ION 

NEW MEXICO S0< IE1 v. 

(The New Mexico Society, ■■ . ■, . . 

' a number of members resident in 

State Societies.) 

CONY Till ' BROWN, Albi ■ , , of Cephas and 

Eunice I : '.- i of 

ing; great-] I '■ ■ : ctsy (IlcaldJ 

i ' / rflfm Heald, Major New Hai 
RICH ' ' [AM DICK] ' 

hon of Ed ivard Dennis 

tilth and Anna Maria (Stcini n] Bryan; great-gi 
Bryan, Member Penna. A scmbly, J';- lent ] ■ C P 

RD AUGUS1 US CAHOON, - . •.. .' I (21 ) • I 

and I (Chase) Cahoon; gi •" I d Louise 

(Baldwin) Chase; great-gn Chase; -/reat J - 

grandson of Epaphras Bull, Major Connecticut Drag< 

GEO! '• • ^MPPIELD, .-, . . •-•/. (19863). Son of 

Charles Henry and Josephine (Jersey) Campficld; gr: 
ander and Margaret Mai 1 C ion of - 

(Tuthill) Cai pfield; gr ■. of Jabez Cam 

Additional Continental Regl . : 
i"r ' NK '.'.'. CL ' N T CY, All N. Mcx. < 21) IM ad Albert 

and Lydia Ardilla (Willcy) Clai ■ ' '."■' 

of Reuben ' (Smith) 

son of Stephen Webster, Sergeant Thi ire R g( 

JOHN LEE CLARK;; (2 525). (Born ' n Cls - 

Church, c ' then to John 1 -.of 

.• S. and Louise Belcher (Clarke) ( " 

Matilda (Shcpard) Gar. , . and Ruth (Cheevi 

''';.• grand »n of James Che .andcr of .' v.ecr 

sloop "Ilaz. 
RALPH STEWART Dl 1 e, N. Mcx. (2052 F Edwii 

I r - • ri . - . ' ; • : 

Abby J - ■-, y, Corpc 

ral, Colonel Craft' - 
;.. [ES E. ELDER, Albuq ■ ■ : . ' I at 

Rebecca Qrth (Whitehill) I rt ai 

n ' :" . i» ■ • Shercr, pri\ 
Militia; great 2 -gr .' . Sherer 

- 
CHARLES A. ELLER, Albuqucr ie, N M ' - : m J. and 

Isabella (Curry) Eller; grandson of William 1 
i: gen) Curry; . Charles 

of Fan Swearinzen, pri 
Militia. 
FRAN.K ALARIC HUBBELL, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (20480 
and Juliana (Gutierrez) Hub) - F John 

■ great-grandson of Johx and Parrilas ." 3te) .' 
son of Comfort Hubbell, Captain of Militia and - mitl ?'.'•' 

• - of V 

HAROLD HURL, Roswell, N. Mex. and 

; grandson of Elisha ai 
grandson of Oliver Edwards, private 
Army. 



REGISTER uP NEW MEMBERS 27q 

I 

WILE RAY I.YON, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (20477). Son of Chester and Chloe 
(Austin) Lyon; grandson of Cyrus and Polly (Goddard) Lyon ; great-grandson 
of EHsha and Sarah (Whitmore) Goddard; great-grandson of Nathaniel God- 
dard, Second Lieutenant Seventh Company, Fifth Hampshire County Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

AMASA BEMIS McGAFFEY, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (19864). Son of Stephen 
R. and Katherine B. McGaffey; grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Hay) Mc- 
Gaffey; great-grandson of William Workman and Molly (Babb) McGaffey; 
great 2 -grandson of John McGaffey, private Third New Hampshire Battalion; 
great 3 -grandson of Neil McGaffey, Ensign Third New Hampshire Line. 

EUCIUS KIMBALL McGAFFEY, Roswell, N. Mex. (210m). Son of Stephen R. 
and Katherine B. McGaffey; grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Hay) McGaf- 
fey; great-grandson of William Workman and Molly (Babb) McGaffey; great-- 
grandson of John McGaffey, private Third New Hampshire Battalion; great-- 
grandson of Neil McGaffey, Ensign Third New Hampshire Eine. 

ORVIEEE ARTHUR MATSON, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (10866). Son of Wilfred 
H. and Mary (Hosford) Matson; grandson of Julius C. and Esther M. Hos- 
ford; great-grandson of Chauncey and Mary Hosford; grcat--grandson of 
Jeremiah Horsford, Jr., private, Colonel Moseley's Conn. Regt. 

JOHN C. ROEEINS, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (21002). Son of John Sanborn and 
Abigail Durgin (Kimball) Rollins; grandson of Moses and Betsey (Osgood) 
Rollins; great-grandson of John Rollins, private, Capt. Thomas Noyes's Com- 
pany Mass. Minute Men. 

EDMUND ROSS, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (20482). Son of Pitt and Maria Clemen- 
tine (Wilson) Ross; grandson of Edmund Gibson and Fannie Maria (Eathrop) 
Ross; great-grandson of Silvester Flint and Cynthia (Rice) Ross; great-grand- 
son of Benjamin and Anna (Gibson) Ross; grcat 3 -grandson of James Ross, 
private, Col. Job Cushing's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

PITT ROSS, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (19867). Son of Edmund Gibson and Fannie 
Maria (Eathrop)' Ross; grandson of Sylvester Flynt and Cynthia (Rice) Ross; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Anna (Gibson) Ross; great 2 -grandson of 
Jatnes Ross, private Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of David Gibson, Corporal, 
Whitney's Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Isaac Gibson, private, Whitcomb's 
Mass. Regt. at Lexington Alarm. 

GEORGE HUBBEEE THOMAS, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (20481). Son of John 
Warren and Eouisa M. (Ilubbell) Thomas; grandson of James I,. and Juliana 
(Gutierrez) Ilubbell; great-grandson of John E- and Sophia R. (Morse) Hub- 
bell; grcat 3 -grandson of John and Parrilas (Foote) Hubbell; grcat'-grandson of 
Comfort Ilubbell, Captain of Militia and Member of Committee of Inspection 
and Observation of Woodbury, Conn. 

ALEXANDER McKAY WHITCOMB, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (20478). Son of 
Robert McKay and Dorcas Abbot (McDolc) Whitcomb; grandson of Robert 
and Mary Ann (McKay) Whitcomb; great-grandson of Robert IVliilcotnb, Ser- 
geant, Col. David Waterbury's Conn. Regt. 

BOWMAN MINER WILLIAMS, Albuquerque, N. Mex. (20522). Son of Edward 
Dennison and Elizabeth Jane (Bittncr) Williams; grandson of Palmer and 
Electa (Nickcrson) Williams; great-grandson of John and Prudence (Palmer) 
Williams; great 2 -grandson of John Williams, Captain Eighth Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

NEW YORK SOCIETY. 

GRAHAM KLINCK ANDERSON, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20231). Son of Daniel B. 
and Charlotte (Klinck) Anderson; grandson of James and Anna (Costigan) 
Anderson; great-grandson of Ecckicl Anderson, private Second Regt. New Jer- 
sey Continental Line; great-grandson of Lewis J. Costigin, First Lieutenant 
Second Regt. New Jersey Continental Line. 



2y6 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



ROBERT ATKINS, New York, N. Y. (15577). (Supplemental.) Son of Charles 
R. and Eliza Boden (Johnson) Alkins; grandson of Clark and Sarah (Terpen- 
ing) Atkins; great-grandson of Sylvester and Betsey Terpening; great-grand- 
son of Hendricus Teerpcning, Lieutenant First Ulster County Rcgt.' New York 
Militia. 
FRANK CHAMBERLAIN AVERY, New York, N. Y. (19902). Son of Zalmon 
Davies and Lucretia (Chamberlain) Avery; grandson of Jacob Payson and 
Catherine (Kuney) Chamberlain; great-grandson of John and Mary (Lee) 
Chamberlain; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Chamberlain, Corporal Mass. Militia; 
grandson of Humphrey and Hannah (Davies) Avery; great-grandson of 
Stephen Avery, private, Colonel Durkee's Conn. Regt. 
MARINER ALVIE AVER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (21102). Son of George Walter and 
Sarah Jane (Aycr) Aver; grandson of William J. and Mary I. (Johnstone) 
Ayer, parents of Sarah Jane; great-grandson of William and Miriam (Thorn- 
ton) Ayer; great-grandson of EHjah Aycr, Sergeant, Col. John Allan's Mass. 
Continental Regt., and Commander of privateer "Rover," 
FREDERICK I. BAKER, Fort Ann, N. Y. (19909). Son of Amyel and Salome 
(Bigelow) Baker; grandson of Benjamin and Achsah (Wilkcson) Baker; great- 
grandson of Benjamin Baker, Ensign, Charlotte County New York Militia. 
REUBEN STANLEY BALDWIN, New York, N. Y. (20226). Son of Hiram and 
Lucy (Clark) Baldwin; grandson of Jacob Hicks and Florence (Waller) Bald- 
win; great-grandson of Amos and Sally (Hicks) Baldwin; great 3 -grandson of 
Simeon Baldwin, private Sixteenth Regt. Conn. Line. 
JOHN CHESTER BALL, Corning, N. Y. (20S09). Son of Chester Almanza and 
Margaret (McLean) Ball; grandson of Adonijah and Anna (Taft) Ball, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Adonijah Ball, private, Colonel Rand's Mass. Regt.; great 2 - 
grandson of Moses Ball, Corporal, Colonel Sparhawk's Seventh Mass. Regt. 
ALBION GILBERT BARTER, Verona, N. J. (N. Y. 19901). Son of Albion K. 
and Fmma J. (Pease) Barter; grandson of William and Caroline (Silkworth) 
Pease; great-grandson of John and Maria (Woods) Silkworth; great'-'-grandson 
of William Silk-worth, private Ulster County New York Militia. 
ROBERT OLDEN P. RATTY, Buffalo, N. Y. (19918). Son of Robert Smith and 
Mary Gardner (Olden) Realty; grandson of Job Gardner and .Maria Brcnton 
(Boggs) Olden; great-grandson of Robert Morris and Jane Elizabeth (Dun- 
bam) Boggs; great-'-grandson of Lewi:; P. Dunham, Surgeon New Jersey Conti- 
nental Line. 
MATTHEW LUM BENNETT, Watkins, N. Y. (20370). Son of Henry A. and 
Mary Ann (King) Bennett; grandson of George and Sarah (Dim) Bennett; 
great-grandson of Matthew Bennett, private Fourth Orange County Regt. New 
York Militia. 
WILLIAM RUSSELL RLACKMAN, Rochester, N. Y. (20815). Son of James 
Russell and Emma Washburn (Yates) Blackmail; grandson of Arthur and 
Jcrusha (Washburn) Yates; great-grandson of William and Hannah (Rainier) 
Yates; grcat--grandson of Ichabod Palmer, Captain Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia. 
ASA PARSHALL BOVIER, Elmira, N. Y. (19914)- Son of John and Louisa 
(Parshall) Bovier, Jr.; grandson of John and Hannah (Smith) Bovier; great- 
grandson of Ward Smith, private Westchester County New York Militia; 
great-grandson of Solomon and Rlenor (Griffin) Bovier; grout-grandson of 
John Griffin, private Third Regt. Ulster County New York Militia; grandson c.f 
Asa and Susannah (Kceney) Parshall; great-grandson of Israel Parshall, Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, Colonel Rotter's IVnna. Regt.; great-grandson of Thomas 
Kecney, private, General Waterbury's Conn. Brigade. 
HENRY L. BRANT, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20357)- Son of Amos A. and Marie 
(Pratt) Brant; grandson of Rlisha L. and Hannah (Chase) Pratt; great-! 
son of William Pratt, Lieutenant, Col. Jeremiah Olncy's Rhode Island Reg , 
pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS '2*}*] 

HENRY SAMMIS BRUSH, Huntington, Long Island, N. Y. (20351). Son of 
Jesse and Marietta (Sammis) Brush; grandson of Zephaniah and Mary ( Kcl- 
sey) Brush; great-grandson of Jesse Brush, Major First Suffolk County New 
York Militia, prisoner. 

LOUIS MONETTF, BRUSH, Huntington, N. Y. {20578). Son of Jesse and Ma- 
rietta (Sammis) Brush; grandson of Zephaniali and Mary (Kelsey) Brush; 
great-grandson of Jesse (and Dorothy Piatt) Brush, Major First Suffolk County 
Regt. New York Militia; grcat 2 -grandson of Zephania Piatt, patriot, imprisoned 
by British in New York. 

CARLL SMITH BURR, Jr., Commack, N. Y. (20596). Son <«f Cnrll S. and 
Emma F. (Case) Burr; grandson of Franklin B. and Sarah (Dougliss) Case; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Smith) Dougliss; great'--graudson of 
Joseph .Smith, Corporal First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

TUNIS BERGEN BURR, Commack, N. Y. (2080&). Son of Carll S. and Lvmma 
V. (Case) Burr; grandson of Franklin B. and Sarah (Dugliss) Case; great- 
grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Smith) Dugliss; great-grandson of Joseph 

Smith, Corporal, Col. Josiah Smith's Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

WILLIAM TAYLOR CARHART, Brooklyn, N. Y. (19916). Son of Peter R. and 

Abigail (Taylor) Carliait; grandson of Robert and Catherine (Rowe) Carliait; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Bloomer) Carliart; great°-grandson of 
Robert Bloomer,, Captain Westchester County New York Militia. 

ZFRBINO JOHN CARLL, Huntington, N. Y. (20373)- Son of Edward and Mary 

Jane (Brandton) Carll; grandson of Jesse and Susan (Smith) Carll; great- 

. grandson of Epenetus and Elizabeth (Smith) Smith, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of 

Epenetus Smith, Sr., Lieutenant Third Suffolk County Regt. New. York Militia. 

ARTHUR PERRY CLARK, Sidney, N. Y. (20353)- Son of Watson Warren and 
Phebc Louisa (Smith) Clark; grandson of Gersham and Mary (Brown) Clark; 
great-grandson of Gersham Clark, private Tenth Company, Seventh Regt. Con- 
necticut Continental Line. 

JOHN TEFFT CLARKE, New York, N. Y. (19915)- Son of Henry Tefft and 
Martha (Fielding) Clarke; grandson of Isaac Dunton and Sophia (Tefft) 
Clarke; great-grandson of Thomas Peckham and Ruth Sisson (Dunton) Clarke; 
great 2 -grandson of John Clarke, Jr., private Capt. Job Gardiner's Company 
Rhode Island troops. 

FRANK CHASE COLYF.R, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20352)- Son of Cornelius Remscn 
and Sarah Eveline (Young) Colycr; grandson of Smith and Angeline (Rem- 
scn) Colyer; great-grandson of Cornelius and Tabitha (Hunt) Remsen; great 9 - 
grandson of Abraham Remsen, Major, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt., Gen. Nathan- 
iel Woodhull's New York Brigade. 

HARRY GLOVER COLYER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (19911). Son of William T. and 
Jenny (Glover) Colyer; grandson of Austin Hurd and Fanny Esther (Betts) 
Glover; great-grandson of Philander and Jane E. (Wilcox) Betts; great-'-grand- 
son of James and Esther (Benedict) Betts; grcat 3 -grandson of Elijah Beits, 
private Conn. Light Horse and Fifth Conn. Line; great 3 -grandson of Augustus 
and Fannie (Benedict) Willcox; great 3 -grandson of John Willcox; private Sev- 
enth Conn. Line; grandson of Cornelius Remsen and Sarah Eveline (Youngs) 
Colycr; great-grandson of (Conklin) Smith and Angeline (Remsen) Colyer; 
great 2 -grandson of Cornelius and Tabitha (Hunt) Remsen; great 3 -grandson of 
Abraliam Remsen, Major, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt., Gen. Nathaniel Wood- 
hull's New York Brigade. 

WILLIAM TIGNEY COLYER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (19012). Son of Cornelius Rem- 
sen and Sarah Eveline (Young) Colyer; grandson of Smith and Angeline 
(Remsen) Colyer; great-grandson of Cornelius and Tabitha (Hunt) Remsen; 
great 2 -grandson of Abraham Remsen, Major, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt., Gen. 
Nathaniel Woodhull's New York Brigade. 

1 



2/iS SONS ())• THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

EDWIN WARREN DE LEON, New York, N. Y. (19903). Son of Harmon Hen- 
drick and Caroline Aqucs (Moise) De Leon; grandson of Abraham and Isabel 
(Nones) De Leon; great-grandson of Jacob De Leon, Captain South Carolina 
troops, and aide to General De Kalb; great-grandson of Benjamin Nones, mem- 
ber of Pulaski Legion and served on staff of General Lafayette. . 

WILLIAM JOHN DENNY, Newark, N. J. (N. Y. 20825). Son of John Wil- 
liam and Mary Baxter (Milne) Denny; grandson of William Henry and Re- 
becca (Bell) Denny; great-grandson of William and Sarah (Bailey) Denny; 
great 2 -grandson of Henry Denny, Sergeant, Capt. John Outwater's New Jersey 
Company, pensioned. 

FRANCIS DE REVERE, Stapleton, N. J. (N. Y. 20355). Son of John and Mary 
(Burras) De Revere; grandson of Abraham and Sally (Briggs) De Revere; 
great-grandson of Cornelius Dc Revere, Corporal, Colonel Hammond's West- 
chester County New York Regt. 

ELBERT MARTINUS DICKERSON, New York, N. Y. (20228). Son of George 
Millspaugh and Jane Elizabeth (Howell) Dickerson; grandson of Sylvanus B. 
and Julia Maria (Conkling) Howell; great-grandson of Silas and Sarah (Webb) 
Howell; great--grandson of Nathaniel Hoivcll, Lieutenant Suffolk County New 
York Militia; grcat 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Webb, Sergeant Second Regt. New 
York Line. 

JULIAN CITAUNCEY DRAKE, Corning, N. Y. (20239). Son of Chaunccy and 
Orpha (Boardman) Drake; grandson of Joseph and Deborah (Rix) Boardman; 
great-grandson of Jonathan and Priscilla (SafTord) Boardman; great--grandson 
of Joseph Boardman, Captain Second Company Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

MARCUS M. DRAKE II, Buffalo, N. Y. (20579). Son of Marcus M. and Mary 
A. (Ludlow) Drake; grandson of Charles IT. and Ann (Hosford) Ludlow; 
great-grandson of Ethan H. and Sallie (Miller) Ludlow; great a -grandson of 
Frederick Miller, private, Capt. Thomas Pritchard's Company Mass. Continental 
troops. 

GEORGE LUTHER EATON, Rochester, N. Y. (20S20). Son of Samuel and 
Sarah (Goodman) Eaton; grandson of Luther and Priscilla (Sibley) Eaton; 
great-grandson of Brighayn Baton, private Conn. Militia at Lexington Alarm, 
pensioned. 

HARRY A. ERWIN, Corning, N. Y. (20585). Son of Samuel S. and Susan (Wil- 
liams) Erwiu; grandson of 1\ E. and Sophie (McCall) Erwin; great-grandson 
of Samuel and Rachel (Ileckman) Erwiu; great 2 -grandson of Arthur Erwin, Col- 
onel Fourth and Second Bucks County Battalions Pcrma. Militia. 

JACOB SLOAT FASSETT, Flmira, N. Y. (20359). Son of Newton P. and Martha 
Ellen (Sloat) Fassett; grandson of Jacob and Sarah Bigelow (Hollenbeek) 
Sloat; great-grandson of Andrew and Louisa (Ransom) Hollenbeek; great 1 - 
grandson of Elias Ransom, private, Col. John Brown's Mass. Regt. 

ELBERT LU VERNE FISH, West Valley, N. Y. (19904). Son of James Madison 
and Permclia Russell (Goodrich) Fish; grandson of Michael and Caroline Gris- 
wold (Russell) Goodrich; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary Griswold (Mills) 
Russell; great ! -grandson of Roger Mills, Sergeant, Col. Charles Webb's Sev- 
enth Conn. Continental Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Peter Mills, private Conn. 
Militia. 

WALTER SARLES FUNNELL, Huntington, N. Y. (20819). Son of EHel Wood 
and Amelia D. (Lewis) Funncll; grandson of John Brush and Rebecca (Lef- 
fcrts) Lewis; great-grandson of Richard and .Sarah (Conklin) Lewis; grcat 3 - 
grandson of Timothy Conklin, Lieutenant First Suffolk County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

MULFORD HELMFR GATCHELL, Lancaster, N. Y. (20806). Son of Nathan 
Bangs and Mary Jane (Ottman) Gatchell; grandson of Abraham and Ruth 
Rocenia (Thrall) Ottman; great-grandson of Peter and Alida (Morrcll) Ott- 
man; great 2 -grandson of Christian Ottman, private, Colonel Clyde's New York 
Regt.; grandson of Joseph and Eleanor (Bangs) Gatchell; great-grandson of 
Lemuel Bangs, private Fourth Regt. Conn. Militia. 



REGISTER OF 'NEW MEMBERS 271; 

ANSEL B. GIEDERSLEEVE, Huntington, N. Y. (20593). Son of Thomas W. 
and Frances B. (Griffith) Gilderslecve; grandson of Epcnetus and Mary (Smith) 
(Griffith); great-grandson of Epcnetus Smith, Second Lieutenant Third Com- 
pany, Third Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

CHARLES PHELPS GRAY, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20368). Son of John M. and Julia 
A. (Phelps) Gray; grandson of Charles C. and Margaret (Jordan) Phelps; 
great-grandson of Erastus Phelps, private Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of 
Amos Pliclps, private Fourth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

JOSEPH ALFRED GUTHRIE, Surgeon, U. S. Navy, New York, N. Y. (20580). 
Son of John Julius and Louisa S. (Spratley) Guthrie; grandson of Benjamin 
and Jeanne G. E. (Schuttc) Spratley; great-grandson of Richard Spratley, pri- 
vate Second Company, Col. Charles Harrison's Virginia Regt. 

SAMUEL HALSTED HALE, West Webster, N. Y. (20227). Son of William 
Lodge and Mary Graham (Halsted) Hale; grandson of Samuel Powell and 
Charlotte Matilda (Halstead) Halsted; great-grandson of Smith and Jemima 
(Putney) Halstead; great'-'-grandson of Samuel Halstead, private, Colonel Paw- 
ling's Regt. New York Line. 

RICHARD LOSEE HARRINGTON, Buffalo, N. Y. (199^2). Son of Eugene W. 
and Clara (Losce) Harrington; grandson of Andrew B. and Adcll (Perkins) 
Harrington; great-grandson of Daniel and Screpta (Hill) Harrington; great*- 
grandson of Ezekiel and Lydia (Cotton) Harrington; great 3 -grandson of Thomas 
Harrington, private Mass. Minute Men at Lexington, April 19, 1775. 

GEORGE BERTRAM KIMBER HARTLEY, Syracuse, N. Y. (20803). Son of 
William Wallace and Amanda (Baker) Hartley; grandson of Daniel Cliftun 
and Elizabeth Passmore (Pierce) Baker; great-grandson of Benjamin and Ta- 
bitha (Clifton) Baker; great 2 -grandson of John Clifton, private First Sussex 
County Company Delaware Militia, pensioned. 

JAMES TOWNER HAYT, Corning, N. Y. (20354). Son of Stephen T. and Mar- 
garet C. (Townsend) Hayt; grandson of John C. and "Martha (Towner) Hayt; 
great-grandson of Stephen Hayt, private Second Regt. Connecticut Continental 
Line. 

AUGUSTUS GEORGE HEATON, New York, N. Y. (20817). Son of Augustus 
and Rosabella (Crean) Heaton; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Goodyear) 
Heaton, Jr.; great-grandson of Joel and Mary Ann (Beardsley) Goodyear; 
great 2 -grandson of Theopliilus Goodyear, Corporal Sixth Regt. Conn. Line, 
pensioned. 

WILLIAM JOHN HEERMANS, Corning, N. Y. (20243). Son of George and 
Harriet C. (Sedgwick) Heermans; grandson of William and Mary Ann (Brad- 
ley) Sedgwick; great-grandson of Hiram and Polly (Beckwith) Sedgwick; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Sedgtvich, private, Col. Samuel Willis's Conn. Con- 
tinental Regt., pensioned. 

HERBERT ANDREW HEMINWAY, Corning, N. Y. (20588).. Son of Allen and 
Caroline D. (Underwood) Heminway; grandson of Calvin and Diantha (Bur- 
lingame) Underwood; great-grandson of Wanton Durlingame, private, Col. 
Ebcnezer Walbridgc's Vermont Regt., pensioned. 

CLIFFORD WOOD HENDRICKSON, Huntington, N. Y. (20595). Son of George 
C. and Mary B. (Wood) Hcndrickson; grandson of Joseph M. and Naomi 
(Rogers) Hcndrickson; great-grandson of Piatt and Experience (Lell'ert) 
Rogers; great 2 -grandson of William Rogers, Quartermaster Sergeant, Colonel 
Malcom's New York Regt. 

GEORGE C. HENDRICKSON, Huntington, N. Y. (20371). Son of Joseph and 
Naomi (Rogers) Hcndrickson; grandson of Piatt and Experience (Lippcrt) 
Rogers; great-grandson of William Rogers, Quartermaster Sergeant, Colonel 
Malcom's New York Regt. 

FRANK M. HILL, Buffalo, N. Y. (20812). Son of Monroe and Henrietta M. 
(Crandall) Hill; grandson of Francis and Amelia (Rusco) Crandall; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel Rusco, private First Suffolk County Regt. New York 
Militia. 



280 SONS 01- 'Jill; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

GEORGE HILL, Buffalo, N. Y. (20811). Sun of Monroe and Henrietta M. 
(Crandall) Hill; grandson of Francis and Amelia (Rusco) Crandall; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel Rusco, private First Suffolk County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

ALANSON BIGELOW HOUGHTON, Corning, N. Y. (20246). Son of Arriory 
and Fllcn Ann (Bigelow) Houghton, Jr.; grandson of Amory and Saphronia 
M. (Oakes) Houghton; great-gradson of Rufus and Abigail (Barnard) Hough- 
ton; great 2 -grandson of Jonatltan Houghton, Captain, Fourth Company, Second 
Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ARTHUR AMORY HOUGHTON, Corning, N. Y. (20244). Son of Amory and 
Ellen Ann (Bigelow) Houghton; grandson of Amory and Saphronia M. (Oakes) 
Houghton; great-grandson of Rufus and Abigail (Barnard) Houghton; great-- 
grandson of Jonathan Houghton, Captain, Fourth Company, Second Worcester 
County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOHN BIGELOW HOWE, Rochester, N. Y. (20594). Son of John Hubbard and 
EHza Augusta (Bigelow) Howe; grandson of Lewis and Sophia (Stowed) Bige- 
low; great-grandson of David and Hannah (Willington) Bigelow; great-'-grand- 
son of David Bigelow, Member of Worcester, Mass., Committee of Safety, 
Representative in Mass. General Court. 

CHESTER EVERTS HOWELL, Elmira, N. Y. (21 103). Son of Daniel Everts 
and Fatima (Minicr) Howell; grandson of Jeremiah and Asenath (Everts) 
Howell; great-grandson of George Howell, private, Col. Henry Wisner's 
Orange County Regt. New York Militia; great-grandson of Daniel Everts 
{Evcritt), Ensign, Col. Wynkoop's Regt. New York Milita. 

RUSSELL HURD, Huntington, N. Y. (20583). Son of Arthur Tappan and 
Gertrude (Westervelt) Hurd; grandson of John Russell and Catherine Margaret 
(Codman) Hurd; great-grandson of Jolin Hurd, in charge of New Hampshire 
scouting parties under Committee of Safety. 

ARTHUR ERWIN IREDELL, Painted Post, N. Y. (20362). Son of Charles and 
Anna Maria (Erwin) Iredell; grandson of Arthur H. and Frances (McKean) 
Erwin; great-grandson of Samuel and Rachel (Heckman) Erwin; great-grand- 
son of Arthur Erwin, Colonel Fourth and Second Battalions Bucks County 
Penna. Militia; great-'-grandson of Adam and Elizabeth (Kreider) Heckman; 
great 3 -grandson of Conrad Kreider, Wagonmaster Northampton County Penna. 
Militia. 

THOMAS EUGENE IRWIN, Huntington, N. Y. (20363). Son of Joseph and 
Martha A. (Lewis) Irwin; grandson of Joseph C. and Mary Lewis; great- 
grandson of Henry Scudder and Julianna (Card) Lewis; great-grandson of 
Timotliy Carll, Captain Third Company, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt. New York 
Militia. 

GEORGE HENRY JACKSON, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20250). Son of Willmot and 
Rose (McBride) Jackson; grandson of James and Sarah (Bates) Jackson; 
great-grandson of J antes Jackson, Corporal, Col. Samuel Brewer's Mass. Con- 
tinental Regt. and other service. 

VINCENT W. JAMES, New York, N. Y. (20356). Son of William W. and Eliza 
Anna (Lucche) James; grandson of Jolin and Elizabeth T. (Loved) Lueche; 
great-grandson of Caleb and Jane (Dill) Lovell; great'-'-grandson of Samuc! 
J^ovcll, Sergeant, Capt. Joseph Trufant's Company for defence of Weymouth, 
Mass.; great'-'-grandson of Daniel Dill, private, Col. John Greaton's Mass. Regt. 

EVERETT STANLEY JARVIS, Huntington, N. Y. (20584). Son of S. Lee and 
Jennie Roberts (Brant) Jarvis; grandson of Philetu's C. and Almeda B. (Scud- 
der) Jarvis; great-grandson of Simon Losce and Keturah (Conklin) Jarvis; 
great e -grandson of Robert and Sarah (Ireland) Jarvis; great-grandson of 
Joseph Ireland, private, Col. Josiah Smith's New York Regt. 

PERCY BRANT JARVIS, Huntington, N. Y. (20577). Son of S. Lee and J< nnie 
Roberts (Brant) Jarvis; grandson of Philetus C. and Almeda B. (Scudder) 



REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS 28 1 

Jarvis; great-grandson of Simon Loscc and Keturah (Conklin) Jarvis; great 2 - 
grandson of Uobert and Sarah (Ireland) jarvis; grcat a -grandson of Joseph Ire- 
land, private, Col. Jo'siah Smith's New Vork Uegt. 

FRANK M. JENKINS, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. (21101). Son of James B. ami 
Frances E. (Gersline) Jenkins; grandson of Esek Sprague and Eve Ann (An- 
thony) Gersline; great-grandson of Andrew and Maria (Yates) Anthony; 
grcat"-grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Vandenburgh) Yates; grcat :: -grandson 
of Peter Yates, Colonel Albany County New York Militia. 

LUCIUS WARREN JOHNSON, Asst. Surgeon, U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C. 
(N. Y. 20242). Son of Lucius and Amelia (Red) Johnson; grandson of Wil- 
liam R. and Mary Ann (Delamater) Johnson; great-grandson of Belcher and 
Hannah (Cahoon) Johnson; grcat--grandson of Hczekiah Jolinson, Captain 
Conn. Minute Men; grandson of William H. and Frances (Wood) Bell; great- 
grandson of Holly and Abigail (Scholield) Bell; great'-'-grandson of Tliaddeus 
Bell, Sergeant Conn. Coast Guards. 

CHAREES EDWIN KRING, New York, N. Y. (20236). Son of Charles and 
Adeline (Vantine) Kling; grandson of John Henry and Hannah Kling; great- 
grandson of Henry Kling, private Third Lancaster County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 

CHARLES A. LAKIN, Manlius, N. Y. (20592). Son of John and Catherine 
(Evans) Lakinj grandson of William Lakin, private Second Battalion New 
Hampshire troops, Col. Nathan Hale. 

GEORGE ERVIN LAMB, Port Henry, N. Y. (20S07). Son of James Madison 
and Abby (Woodworth) Lamb; grandson of Guy and Abigail (Ingersoll) 
Woodworth; great-grandson of Thomas Ingersoll, Captain Mass. Militia. 

ALBERT E. LA TOUR, Buffalo, N. Y. (19908). Son of Anthony William and 
Sarah (Hatfield) La Tour; grandson of Anthony William La Tour, private 
South Carolina and Mass. troops. 

THEODORE 'LRUESDALE LINES, New York, N. Y. (11220). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Major and Martha (Truesdalc) Lines, Jr.; grandson of Major Lines, 
Lieutenant Second Company Governor's Foot Guards of Connecticut. 

RAYMOND LOUNSBERY, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20235)- Son of Stephen Raymond 
and Elizabeth (Henderson) Lounsbery; grandson of Nchemiah and Margaret 
(Purdy) Lounsbery; great-grandson of Stephen Lounsbery, private Second 
Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

EDWARD MALDEN LOWMAN, Lowman, N. V. (2037.1). Son of William and 
Mary Ann (Beers) Lowman; grandson of Jabez Holly and Rebecca (Wood) 
Beers; great-grandson of Timothy Beers (Bears), private Fourth Orange 
County Rcgt. New York Militia. 

EDGAR ALLAN LOWTH ER, New York, N. Y. (20361). Son of Robert Alex- 
ander and Alma (Sears) Lowther; grandson of William Ireland and Caroline 
Virginia (Mitchell) Lowther; great-grandson of Alexander and Sarah (Ireland) 
Lowther; great-grandson of William and Margaret (Morrison) Lowther; 
grcat 3 -grandson of William Lowther, Commandant of Militia of Western 
Virginia. 

EDWARD PAYSON LUPFER, Buffalo, N. Y. (18424). (Supplemental.) Son of 
Samuel and Matilda J. P. (McClure) Lupfer; grandson of Jacob and Eleanor 
(Marshall) Lupfer; great-grandson of Casper Lupfer, private Fifth Cumberland 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

HENRY MARTYN McCULLOCIl, Lawrenceville, Pa. (N. Y. 20375). Son of 
Samuel Johnson and Emily Lindsley (Thorp) McCnlloch; grandson of Michael 
Rose and Jcrusha (Lindsley) Thorp; great-grandson of Eleazcr and Unice 
(Halsey) Lindsley; great-grandson of Elcaser Lindsley, Lieutenant-Colonel 
New Jersey Militia and Spencer's Continental Regt., Member of New Jersey 
Assembly. 



282 SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

CHARGES HATCHER McKINNEY, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20589). Son of Joseph 
Paxton and Ida (Platcher) McKinney; grandson of George II. and Hannah 
(Pax ton) McKinney; great-grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Logan) Paxton; 
great 2 -grandson of John Paxton, Captain Rockbridge Virginia Militia. 

KENNF/iTI HAROLD MARTIN, New York, N. Y. (19905). Son of Charles Bo- 
man and Minnie (Raynor) Martin; grandson of John S. and Sarali E. (Vail) 
Martin; great-grandson of James and Margaret (Thompson) Vail; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph and Julia (Smith) Vail; great 3 -grandson of Gilbert T. Vail, 
private Orange County New York Militia, killed at Minisink Massacre, July 22, 
1779- 

HIRAM D. MASON, Syracuse, N. Y. (19906). Son of Mortimer and Esther (Vail) 
Mason; grandson of Hiram and Ida (Green) Mason; great-grandson of Jlczc- 
kiah Mason, private, Capt. Daniel Brown's Company Mass. Militia. 

ALBERT SCOTT MATTHEWS, Buffalo, N. Y. (20232). Son of Charles B. and 
Jennie L. (Beardsley) Matthews; grandson of Amenzo W. and Nancy (Perry) 
Beardsley; great-grandson of Dorus and Louisa (Ewell) Perry; great-'-grandson 
of James Ewell, private, Colonel Woodbridge's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES BENEDICT MATTHEWS, Buffalo, N. Y. (20805). Son of Isaac V. 
and Phoebe Ann (Brooks) Matthews; grandson of Benedict and Maria (Mc- 
Nair) Brooks; great-grandson of David Brooks, Lieutenant of galley "Crane" 
and private, Colonel Belding's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

EUGENE D. MILLER, New York, N. Y. (20372). Son of Austin and Mary O. 
(Bunten) Miller; grandson of Cornelian and Mary Ann (Taylor) Buntcn; 
great-grandson of Robert and Dorcas (Benedict) Bunten; great 2 -grandson of 
Jacob Benedict, private Fourth Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

FRANK HENRY MILLER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (20S24). Son of William Bordwell 
and Harriet (Henry) Miller; grandson of Jeffrey and Mary (Pierce) Henry; 
great-grandson of Lewis and Sally Young (Buck) Henry; great 2 -grandson of 
Robert B. and Sarah Henry; great s -grandson of William Henry, Jr., private, 
Col. Samuel Ashley's New Hampshire Regt. 

GOUVERNEUR M. MILLSPAUGH, Walden, N. Y. (20366). Son of Gouverneur 
M. and Sarah Jane (Cameron) Millspaugh; grandson of Peter A. and Sallie 
(Kimbark) Millspaugh ; great-grandson of Abraham Millspaugh, Sergeant Fourth 
Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

DAVID TAYLOR MORGAN, Southport, Conn. (N. Y. 19924). Son of Thomas and 
Ann (Taylor) Morgan; grandson of William and Elizabeth (Fdie) Taylor; 
great-grandson of James Julie, private, Van Woert's Albany County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

DAVID A. MORRISON, Newburgh, N. Y. (13083). (Supplemental.) Son of 
Hamilton and Maria (Mould) Morrison; grandson of Jonathan and Elizabeth 
(Moule) Mould; great-grandson of Jolinnnes (and Maria Lau or Louw) Maul, 
Jr., and of Cliristoffel Moule, privates Second Ulster County Regt. New York 
Militia; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Lau (Louzv) and of Johannis Maul, 
privates Second Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

GEORGE HAMILTON MORRISON, Montgomery, N. Y. (12714). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Hamilton and Maria (Mould) Morrison; grandson of Jonathan and 
Elizabeth (Moule) Mould; great-grandson of Johannes (and Maria Lau or 
Louw) Moul, Jr., and of Christoffcl Moule, privates Second Ulster County 
Regt. New York Militia; great--grandson of Jonathan Lau (Louw) and of 
Johannis Maul, privates Second Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

ROBERT H. MOSES, New York, N. Y. (20818). Son of Guy and Lucina Cla- 
rissa (Bingham) Moses; grandson of Zebina and Jane (Grimes) Moses; great- 
grandson of Zebina and Theodosia (Curtis) Moses; grcat 2 -grandson of Daniel 
Moses, private Seventeenth Conn. Continental Regt.; grandson of Calvin arid 
Betsy (Scott) Bingham; great-grandson of Phineas (and Thankful Kinsley) 
Scott, private Vermont Militia; great-grandson of Calvin Bingham, private 



REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS 283 

Vermont Militia; great 3 -grandson of John Kinsley, private Vermont Militia; 
great 2 -grandson of Elipltalet Curtis, Captain Eighteenth Conn. Regt; great- 
grandson of Moses Grimes, private Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 
URI MULFORD, Corning, N. Y. (20358). Son of Eleazer Perry and Sarah Jane 
(Davis) Mulford; grandson of Eleazer and Elizabeth (Lillibridgc) Mulford; 

! great-grandson of Ezekiel and Nancy Ann (Lindsley) Mulford; great 2 -grandson 

of Ezekiel Mulford, Captain Twelfth Company, First Regt., Suffolk County 
New York Militia; great 2 -grandson of Eleazer Lindsley (Linsley), Lieutenant 
Colonel, Col. Oliver Spencer's New Jersey Regt. of Foot. 

FREDERICK M. MUNROE, Huntington, N. Y. (20598). Son of Charles William 
and Susan M. (Ilnll) Munroc; grandson of Edmund and Sophia (Sewall) 
Munroc; great-grandson of William Munroc, $d, Lieutenant Mass. Militia. 

HENRY PRIME NOBLE, Ann Arbor, Mich. (N. Y. -0238). Son of Franklin and 
Emma (Prime) Noble; grandson of Edward Youngs and Emma (Cotrel) Prime; 
great-grandson of Ebenezer and Experience (Conklin) Prime; great-'-grandson 
of Benjamin Youngs Prime, patriot writer and public speaker, Member of Sons 
of Liberty; grcat 3 -grandson of Ebenezer Prune, patriot preacher in New York; 
great 2 -grandson of Ezra Conklin, Corporal, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt. Sutfolk 
County New York Militia. 

LORENZO OVIATT, Corning, N. Y. (21 105). Born January 13, 1817. Son of 
Ebenezer Oziait, private Tenth Mass. Regt. and Colonel Scammell's New 
Hampshire Regt., pensioned. 

BYRON PIERCE, Coopers Plains, N. Y. (20249). Son of Alson and Sylvia (Cor- 
bin) Pierce; grandson of Benjamin Pierce, Sergeant, Col. Enoch Hale's New 
Hampshire Regt. and other service. 

FRANK CEPHUS PLATT, Painted Post, N. Y. (20240). Son of Cephus F. and 
Mary E. (Erwin) Piatt; grandson of Francis E. and Sophia (McCall) Erwin; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Rachel (Heckman) Erwin; great 2 -grandson of 
Arthur Erwin, Colonel Fourth Bucks County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

DANIEL FREDERIC POTTER, Buffalo, N. Y. (20364). Son of Daniel and 
Marina Loud (Pratt) Potter; grandson of Norton and Priscilla (Loud) Pratt; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Betsey (Tirrell) Loud; great 2 -grandson of 
William Loud, private, Capt. Thomas Nash's Company, Col. Solomon Lovell's 
Mass. Regt. 

HARRY HAYT PRATT, Corning, N. Y. (20360). Son of George W. and Helen 
M. (Hayt) Pratt; grandson of Harry and Thankful (Crosby) Hayt; great- 
grandson of Stcplien Hayt, private Second Connecticut Regt. 

SIDNEY IRVIN PRESCOTT, Camden, N. J. (N. Y. 20586). Son of Sylvester and 
Mary Moulton (Proctor) Prcscott; grandson of Charles and Asenath (Thomp- 
son) Prescott; great-grandson of John and Sally (Knight) Prescott; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Prescott, private Third New Hampshire Regt.; great 3 - 
grandson of Jolm Prcscott, signer of Association Test. 

GILBERT PRIME, Brooklyn, N. Y. ( 19925). Son of Nathaniel Scudder and Alary 
Elizabeth (Piatt) Prime; grandson of Ebenezer and Experience (Conklin) 
Prime; great-grandson of Benjamin Youngs Prime, patriot writer and public 
speaker, Member of Sons of Liberty; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Prime, 
patriot preacher in New York; great-grandson of Ezra Conklin, Corporal, 
Colonel Smith's Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia; grandson of Gilbert 
and Ida (Wood) Piatt; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Deborah (Helme) Wood; 
great 2 -grandson of Jeremiah Wood, private, Colonel Smith's Suffolk County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

CHESTER DE WITT PUGSLEY, Peekskill, N. Y. (19907). Son of Cornelius 
Amory and Emma C. (Gregory) Pugsley; grandson of Gilbert Taylor and Julia 
Butler (Meeker) Pugsley; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Hannah Undcrhill 
(Taylor) Pugsley; great 2 -grandson of Samuel (and Elizabeth Drake) Pugsley, 
private Sixth Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia; grcat 3 -grandson of 
Jeremiah Drake, private Third Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 



284 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



ROYDON ROCKEFELLER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (19010). Son of Henry Harrison 
and Florence (Myers) Rockefeller; grandson of Philip and Marie Elizabeth 
(Rockefeller) Rockefeller; great-grandson of Henry and Margarctha (Loschcr) 
Rockefeller, parents of Philip; great-'-grandson of PliiJip Rockefeller, Adjutant 
Tenth Albany County Regt. New York Militia; great-grandson of Peter Frcd- 
eriek and Catherine (Persons) Rockefeller (parents of Marie Elizabeth); great-- 
grandson of Frederick and Elizabeth (Zipperle) Rockefeller; grcat 3 -grandson of 
Dial Rockefeller, Captain New York Militia; grandson of Abraham H. and 
Han ah (Blanchard) Myers; great-grandson of Justin Blanchard, private, Col- 
onel I'. ridge's Mass. Regt. 

CAMILLUS PLATT ROGERS, Huntington, N. Y. (20229). Son of Stephen Conk- 
lin and Claria Louisa (Rogers) Rogers; grandson of Conklin and Lydia (Brush) 
Rogers; great-grandson of Isaac and Hannah (Conklin) Rogers; great-grand- 
son of Thomas Conklin, 3d, private First Regt. Suffolk County New York Mil- 
itia; great-grandson of Abel and Margaret (Ireland) Brush; great--grandson of 
Joseph Ireland, private First Regt. Suffolk County New York Militia. 

FREDERICK BRADLEY ROGERS, New York, N. Y. (20600). Son of Henry 
Montgomery and Harriet (Chambers) Rogers; grandson of William and Char- 
lotte (Van Velsor). Rogers; great-grandson of William Rogers, Quartermaster 
Sergeant, Colonel Malcom's New York Regt. 

HERMAN FONTNELLE ROGERS, Huntington, N. Y. (20233). Son of Isaac and 

Mary Judith (Smith) Rogers; grandson of Conklin and Lydia (Brush) Rogers; 

great-grandson of Isaac and Hannah (Conklin) Rogers; great-'-grandson of 

Thomas Conklin, private, Col. Josiah Smith's Suffolk County Regt. New York 

.. Militia. 

ALBERT CORNELIUS RUST, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (10919)- Son of William 
Henry and Maria (Tripp) Rust; grandson of George Washington Gale and 
Mary Ann (Revere) Rust; great-grandson of David and Rhoda (Bell) Rust; 
grcat a -grandson of Levi Rust, private, Colonel Enos's Conn. Regt. 

EDWIN WOOD SAMMIS, Huntington, N. Y. (20814). Son of Henry F. and 
Henrietta (Wood) Sanunis; grandson of Jesse F. and Mary Esther (Brush) 
Sammis; great-grandson of Zephaniah and Mary (Kelsey) Brush; great 8 - 
grandson of Jesse Brush, Major, First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia; 
grandson of Edwin ami Ruth (Titus) Wood; great-grandson of Brewster H. 
and Matilda (Conklin) Wood; great 2 -grandson of Ezra Conklin, Corporal First 
Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia; great-grandson of Zebulon and Mary 
(Douglass) Titus; great-'-grandson of William and Susan (Conklin) Douglass; 
great 3 -grandson of Thomas Conklin, private, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt. New 
York Militia; great'-'-grandson of Jesse and Dorothy (Piatt) Brush; great 3 - 
grandson of Zephaniah Plait, patriot, imprisoned by British in New York; 
great 2 -grandson of Jeremiah and Deborah (Helmc) Wood; great 3 -grandson of 
Jeremiah Wood, private, Col. Josiah .Smith's Regt. New York Militia. 

EVEREST SAMMIS, Huntington, N. Y. (20804). Son of Oliver Smith and 
Adelia (Sammis) Sammis; grandson of Oliver and Phebe (Ireland) Sammis; 

great-grandson of Derrick and (Corwin) Ireland; great-'-grandson of 

Daniel and (Smith) Ireland; grcat 3 -grandson of Joseph Ireland, private 

First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

THERON HERBERT SAMMIS, Huntington, N. Y. (20576). Son of J. Newell 
and Mary C. (Smith) Sammis; grandson of Moses R. and Mary II. (Wood) 
Smith; great-grandson of Thomas W. and Jane Wood; great-'-grandson of 
Theophilus Wood, private Third Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

TOWNSEND SCUDDER, Glen Head, N. Y. (20801). Son of Townsend and 
Sarah M. (Frost) Scuddcr; grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Hewlett) Scud- 
derj great-grandson of Henry Scuddcr, Lieutenant First Suffolk County Regt. 
New York Militia. 

ARTHUR LOWELL S1IERER, Tarrytown, N. Y. (20816). Son of William and 
Adelaide J. (Clark) Sherer; grandson of William and Susan (Alfriend) 



REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS 285 



Sherer; great-grandson of David Sherer, private, Col. Joseph Cilley's New 
Hampshire Continental Rcgt. 

DUNHAM BALDWIN SHERER, New York, N. Y. (20597). Son of William and 
Adelaide J. (Clark) Sherer; grandson of William and Susan (Alfriend) 
Sherer; great-grandson of David Sherer, private, Col. Joseph Cilley's New 
Hampshire Continental Regt. 

NEESON CORNELIUS SIMMS, Elmendorf, N. Mex. (N. Y. 20810). Son of 
George and Charlotte Elizabeth (Snell) Simms; grandson of Cornelius R. and 
Mary II. (Truax) Snell; great-grandson of Reuben and Mary E. (Bellinger) 
Snell; great 2 -grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Campbell) Bellinger; great-- 
grandson of Peter P. and Elizabeth (Harter) Bellinger; great'-grandson of 
Frederick P. Bellinger, Lieutenant Colonel, Col. Peter Bellinger's Regt. New 
York Militia. 

EDWIN CONRAD SORNBERGER, Buffalo, N. Y. (20590). Son of Edwin and 
Mary Maria (Dibble) Sornberger; grandson of Conrad and Sally (Brown) 
Sornberger; great-grandson of David and Mercy (Jackson) Brown; great-- 
grandson of Giles Jackson, Lieutenant Colonel Pirst Berkshire County Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

TENBROECK M. TERHUNE, New York, N. Y. (20S02). Son of Charles Prcd- 
eric and Plorida Washington (Ten Broeck) Terhune; grandson of Rensselaer 
and Mary Monroe (Terry) Ten Broeck; great-grandson of John Van Rens- 
salaer and Elizabeth (Van Ness) Ten Broeck; great-grandson of Adam Ten 
Broeck, Ensign Fourth Company, Eighth Regt. New York Militia. 

EGBERT MARVIN TER KUILE, New York, N. Y. (20821). Son of Jacob and 
Cora Belle (Marvin) ter Kuile; grandson of Nathaniel Curtis and Julia Ann 
(Fitch) Marvin; great-grandson of Thomas and Dency (Tiffany) Marvin; 
great ! -grandson of Matthew Marvin, Sergeant "Lafayette Regt." Light In- 
fantry. 

CHARLES OSBORNE TILTON, Norfolk, Va. (N. Y. 20230). Son of Thurston 
White and Agnes Barnard (Weeks) Tilton; grandson of Osborne Carey and 
Anne (Austin) Tilton; great-grandson of Francis West and Parnel Tilton; 
great'-grandson of Ezra and Mary (Weeks) Tilton; grcat 3 -grandson of Uriah 
Tilton, Major Mass. Militia. 

RUDOLPH LINXOLN TITUS, Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. (20369). Son of Piatt 
and Helen (Rogers) Titus; grandson of Zebulon and Mary (Douglass) Titus; 
great-grandson of William and Susan (Conklin) Douglass; grcat--grandson of 
Thotnas Conklin, private, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt. New York Militia; grand- 
son of Daniel and Rebecca (Conklin) Rogers; great-grandson of Richard Conk- 
lin, Signer of Association Test, imprisoned by British in New York. 

CLARENCE ELLSWORTH TOWNSEND, Painted Post, N. Y. (20248). Son of 
Frederick Jerome and Viola Elizabeth (Rodman) Townsend; grandson of Ed- 
ward Ervvin and Nancy Lawrence (Jerome) Townsend; great-grandson of Ed- 
ward and Eliza (Frwin) Townsend; great 3 -grandson of Samuel and Rachel 
(Ileckman) Erwin; greats-grandson of Arthur Erwin-, Colonel Fourth Bucks 
County Battalion I'enna. Militia; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Mul- 
ford) Jerome; great 2 -grandson of Elisha Mulford, Jr., and great a -grandson of 
Elisha Mulford, Sr., signers of "General Association" of East Hampton, N. Y., 
'775; great 3 -grandson of Adam and Elizabeth (Kreider) TIeckman; great-- 
grandson of Conrad Kreider, Wagon Master .Northampton County I'enna. 
Militia. 

FREDERICK JEROME TOWNSEND, Painted Post, N. Y. (20247). Son of Ed- 
ward Erwin and Nancy Lawrence (Jerome) Townsend; grandson of Edward 
and Eliza (Erwin) Townsend; great-grandson of Samuel and Rachel (Heck- 
man) Erwin; grcal'--grandson of Arthur Erzvin, Colonel Fourth Bucks County 
Battalion Penna. Militia; grandson of Richard and Mary (Mulford) Jerome; 
great-grandson of Elisha Mulford, Jr., and great-'-grandson of Elisha Mulford, 
Sr., signers of "General Association" of East Hampton, N. Y., 1775; great'- 
grandson of Adam and Elizabeth (Kreider) Ileckman; great'-grandson of Con- 
rad Kreider, Wagon Master Northampton County I'enna. Militia. 



286 sons of the; American revolution 

HOWARD SMITH VELSOR, Huntington, N. Y. (20581). Son of David and 
Emily (Smith) Velsor; grandson of Jonas Piatt and Rebecca (Rusco) Smith; 
great-grandson of Elialcim and Rosetta Smith; grcat 2 -grandson of Samuel Smith, 
First Lieutenant First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia; great-grandson 
of Silas and Judith (I'latt) Rusco; great-'-grandson of David Rusco, private 
First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia J grcat'-'-grandson of Jonas and 
Rebecca (Bennett) Piatt; great 3 -grandson of John Bennett, fifer First Suffolk 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

THOMAS WALKUP, New York, N. Y. (20237). Son of Thomas and Celinda M. 
(Dietz) Walkup; grandson of Peter and Martha (McGuire) Dietz; great-grand- 
son of Hugh McGuire, private, Col. Albert Tawling's Regt. New York Levies. 

JAMES HORATIO WARRING, Brooklyn, N. Y. (19334). (Supplemental.) Son 
of Alexander and Phoebe (Chichester) Walling; grandson of Jrimcs and Cla- 
rinda (Chamberlain) Walling; great-grandson of Jonathan and Rachael (Ford) 
Chamberlain; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Ford, Lieutenant Colonel Albany County 
Now York Militia. 

GRAHAM II. WALWORTH, New York, N. Y. (20591). Son of Hiram and Cor- 
nelia Lynde (Bailey) Walworth; grandson of Hiram and Delia (Griffin) Wal- 
worth; great-grandson of Benjamin Walworth, Quartermaster, Col. Isaac Nich- 
ols's O'range County Regt. New York Militia. 

•GEORGE OSCAR BALLARD WEAVER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (16507). (Supple- 
mental.) Son of Greenbury William and Eunice Buss (Ballard) Weaver; 
grandson of George and Mary M. (Everhart) Weaver; great-grandson of 
George Evcrhart, Second Lieutenant Maryland Militia; grandson of Nathan 
and Hannah (Buss) Ballard; great-grandson of Stephen and Phcebe (Reyes) 
Buss; great 2 -grandson of John Kcyes, signer of declaration by inhabitants of 
Wilton, New Hampshire. 

WARNER GOODRICH WHITE, Buffalo, N. Y. (20587). Son of William J. and 
Viola M. (Hill) White; grandson of James and Catherine Seymour (Callender) 
White, Jr.; great-grandson of James and Rosamond (Warner) White; great 3 - 
grandson of Stephen Warner, Lieutenant Second Hampshire County Regt. 
Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of David White, private, Colonel Bailey's Mass. 
Continental Regt. 

HOWARD HARPER WHITNEY, New York, N. Y. (1992O. Son of Benjamin 
Shurtleff and Elizabeth (Bell) Whitney; grandson of Daniel and Hannah 
(Shed) Whitney; great-grandson of Josiah Whitney, Colonel Second Worcester 
County Regt. Mass. Militia, Member Mass. Legislature. 

GENTRY STILLMAN WILLIAMS, Huntington, N. Y. (20599). Son of Robert 
Bruce and Elizabeth (Stillman) Williams; grandson of Gilbert Potter and Lu- 
cinda (Finch) Williams; great-grandson of Gilbert and Martha (Potter) Wil- 
liams; great 2 -grandson of Gilbert Potter, Lieutenant Colonel First Suffolk 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

LEVI M. WILLIAMS, Waldcn, N. Y. (20367). Son of Moses and Hannah (Conk- 
lin) Williams; grandson of Daniel and Euphemia (Odell) Conklin; great- 
grandson of Amos Odell, private Seventh Dutchess County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

CHARLES ABBOTT HARVEY WILLIS, Huntington, N. Y. (20582). Son of 
Charles B. and Mary E. (Hodgrnan) Willis; grandson of Benjamin and Mary 
(Gilson) Hodgrnan; great-grandson of Benjamin and Polly (Stevens) Hodg- 
rnan; great ,J -grandson of Benjamin Hodgrnan, private, Colonel Prescott's Mass. 
Regt. 

DANIEL SLOTE WOOD, Huntington, N. Y. (19923^ Son of John F. and Sarah 
A. (Slotc) Wood; grandson of John and Deborah (Fleet) Wood; great-grand- 
son of Pcleg and Esther (Brush) Wood; grcat 2 -grandson of Jeremiah Wood, 
2d, private First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 



RKGISTlvK 01- NF,W MEMBERS 1'S/ 

JOHN FLEET WOOD, Huntington, N. Y. (199 13). Son of John Fleet and Sarah 
A. (Slote) Wood; grandson of John and Dehorah (Fleet) Wood; great-grand- 
son of Peleg and Esther (Brush) Wood; great-'-grandson of Jeremiah Wood, 
2d, private First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

WILLIAM WILTON WOOD, Jr., Huntington, N. Y. (20241). Son of William 
Wilton and Elizabeth (Jones) Wood; grandson of William W. and Fliza S. 
(Scuddcr) Wood; great-grandson of John and Deborah (Fleet) Wood; great 2 - 
grandson of Peleg and Father (Crush) Wood; great 3 -grandson of Jeremiah 
Wood, 2d, private First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM YATES, Rochester, N. Y. (20813). Son of Arthur 
Gould and Virginia L. (Holden) Yates; grandson of Arthur and Jerusha 
(Washburn) Yates; great-grandson of William and Hannah (Palmer) Yates; 
grent 2 -grandson of Icliabod Palmer, Captain Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

DAVID BURGER YOUNG, Huntington, N. Y. (21 104). Son of Thomas B. and 
Mary C. (Gildcrsleeve) Young; grandson of Thomas W. and Frances B. 
(Griffith) Gildcrsleeve; great-grandson of Epenetus and Mary (Smith) Griffith; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Epenetus Smith, Lieutenant Third Company, Third Suffolk 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

OHIO SOCIETY. 

W r ESLEY PHILIP ARNER, Fowler, Ohio (20377). Son of Daniel and Elizabeth 
(Harklerodc) Arner; grandson of Philip and Susan (Broadsword) Arner; great- 
grandson of Ulrich Arner, private Northampton County Pcnna. Rangers. 

MINER ALBERT ATMUR, Lima, Ohio (20389). Son of Marshall and Elizabeth 
(Hoffman) Atmur; grandson of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Gotwalt) Hoffman; 
great-grandson of Andrew Gottvalt, Sergeant, Captain Copenhafer's Pcnna. 
Company; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Gotwalt, Ensign First Battalion York 
County Penna. Associators; great-grandson of Philip Hoffman, private First 
Battalion York County Penna. Associators. 

HENRY AUGUSTUS AXLINE, Columbus, Ohio (20396). Son of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Crooks) Axlinc; grandson of John Axline, private Third Regt. Vir- 
ginia Line. 

BERNARD BARTON BIGELOW, Findlay, Ohio (20384). Son of Charles Henry 
and Flora May (Vance) Bigelow; grandson of Horace Muzzy and Flora (Shat- 
tuck) Vance; great-grandson of Alexander and Flora (Andrews) Shattuck; 
great 2 -grandson of William and Eunice (Blood) Shattuck; great-grandson of 
Job Shattuck, Captain Sixth Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Wilson and Sarah 
(Wilson) Vance; great 2 -grandson of Joscpli Colvillc Va)icc, private Eleventh 
Virginia Continental Regt.; great s -grandsun of William Vance, Captain Twelfth 
and Eighth Virginia Regis.; grandson of Philip Doddridge and Harriet Iline 
(Frisbie) Bigelow; great-grandson of Calvin and Charlotte (Hine) Frisbie; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Amos Frisbie, Lieutenant Fifth Company, Thirteenth Conn. 
Regt. 

ROBERT AUSTIN BISHOP, Chagrin Falls, Ohio (20392). Son of Wilfred Wal- 
lace and Caroline (McFarland) Bishop; grandson of Sanford Holmes and 
Fanny Melissa (Cannon) Bishop; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Palmer) 
Bishop; great 2 -grandson of Jcdidiah Palmer, Member of Committee of Safety 
of Norwich, Conn. 

ENSIGN NEWTON BROWN, Youngstown, Ohio (20376)- Son of Richard and 
Thalia F. (Newton) Brown; grandson of Eben and Mary S. (Church) Newton; 
great-grandson of Ensign and Jerusha (Bidwell) Church; great'-'-grandson of 
Nathaniel (and Lois Ensign) Church, private, Capt. Simon Spalding's Indepen- 
dent Company at Wyoming, Pa., pensioned; great 3 -grandson of John Ensign, 
Captain, Col. Increase Moscley's Mass. Regt. 

HENRI EDMUND BUCK, Delaware, Ohio (19674)- Son of Israel E. and Sarah 
Wilson (Van Deman) Buck; grandson of Edmund and Anna (Hubbell) Buck; 
great-grandson of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Collins) Hubbell; great 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Collins, private, Colonel Van Rensselaer's Regt. New York Militia. 



288 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

JAMES HOWARD CHESSROWN, Youngstown, Ohio (20902). Son of Dan 
Thomas and Mary Jane- (Anderson) Chessrown; grandson of John Sharp and 
Sarah (Ferree) Anderson; great-grandson of George Anderson, private, Colonel 
Broadhead's Regt. Penna. Line, Continental Establishment. 

RAY T. CONGER, Toledo, Ohio (20385). Son of Daniel YV. and Isabelle (Watson) 
Conger; grandson of William Titus and Mary (Evcritt) Watson; great-grandson 
of Titus and Sarah (Van Dorn) Watson; great-grandson of Titus Watson, 
Captain Seventh Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

CHARGES MARION CROOK, Yottngstown, Ohio (20903). Son of Edward F. 
and Catharine (Stults) Crook; grandson of Peter and Sally Ann (Jayne) 
Stults; great-grandson of Isaac L. and Sarah Oziah Jayne; grcat 8 -grandson of 
Isaac Jayne, Lieutenant Penna. Flying Camp. 

CLARENCE S. CROOK, Youngstown, Ohio (20901). Son of Edward F. and 
Catharine (Stults) Crook; grandson of Peter and Sally Ann (Jayne) Stults; 
great-grandson of Isaac L. and Sarah Oziah Jayne; great-grandson of Isaac 
Jayne, Lieutenant Penna. Flying Camp. 

EDWARD EVERETT EMERY, Youngstown, Ohio (20905). Son of John Bent- 
ley and Mary Ann (Kennedy) Emery; grandson of William and Lydia (Har- 
lan) Emery; great-grandson of Jonathan Harlan, private Chester County 
Penna. Militia. 

SAMUEL KIRTLAND HINE, Girard, Ohio (20906). Son of Daniel and Emma 
(Kirtland) Iline; grandson of Homer and Mary (Skinner) Iline; great-grand- 
son of Noble Hine, Captain Conn. .Militia; great-grandson of Abraham Skinner, 
private Fourth Conn. Line. 

JAMES IT. HUNT, Massillon, Ohio (20397). Son of Salmon Long and Helen 
(Per Lee) Hunt; grandson of Abraham and Maria (Cutler) Per Fee; great- 
grandson of Edmond Per Lee, Paymaster New York State Militia. 

CHARLES FOLLETT, Cincinnati, Ohio (19670). Son of John Fassett and Fran- 
ces (Dawson) Follett; grandson of John Fassett and Sarah I.emira (Wood- 
worth) Follett; great-grandson of Martin Dewey and Persia (Fassett) Folleit; 
great--grandson of Eliphalct Folleit, defender of Wyoming' Valley Settlement, 
killed at Kingston, Pa., July 3, 177S. 

JOHN FRANCIS GILLEN, Youngstown, Ohio (20378). Son of Tcter and Theresa 
(Woods) Gillen; grandson of William and Mary (Sheehy) Woods; great-grand- 
son of Daniel (and Jane McLain) Sheehy, Corporal Eleventh Regt. Penna. 
Continental Line; great--grandson of Robert McLain, private Seventh Com- 
pany, First Battalion Cumberland County Penna. Militia. 

EDWARD M. HALL, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio (19671). Son of Edward M. and Laura 
(Nevius) Hall; grandson of Aaron and Sarah (Beaver) Nevius; great-grandson 
of Peter and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Beaver; great 2 -grandson of George Beaver, 
private Fourth Penna. Battalion. 

HUGH HOMER HAMILTON, Youngstown, Ohio (19661). (Supplemental.) Son 
of Wilson S. and Mary Floyd (Roberts) Hamilton; grandson of Emanuel and 
Katharine (Deeds) Hamilton; great-grandson of William and Mary (Hull) 
Hamilton; great 2 -grandson of Solomon Hull, private New Jersey troops and 
Bedford County Penna. Rangers. 

HENRY WALLACE HOWE, Cleveland, Ohio (20391). Son of John B. and Adelia 
(Laubach) l\<y>vc; grandson of Rudolph II. and Cathrine (Roth) Laubach; 
great-grandson of George and Mary (Ritter) Roth; great 2 -grandson of Chris- 
tian Roth, Lieutenant Northampton County Penna. Flying Camp, prisoner, 

CHARLES HOYT, Chillicothc, Ohio (19675). Son of Nason and Susan (Webster) 
Iloyt; grandson of Joseph and Sallie (Stevens) Hoyt; great-grandson of Joseph 
and Sally (Cass) Hoyt; grcat'-'-grandson of Joseph Iloyt, private, Colonel 
Wentworth's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

OBADIAH F. ILGENFRITZ, Alliance, Ohio (20379). Son of Frederick and 
Elizabeth (Miller) Ilgenfritz; grandson of John and Catharine (fink) Ilgen- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 289 

fritz; great-grandson of Frederick Ilgenfritz, Jr.; great-grandson of Frederick 
Ilgcnfritz, private Penna. troops. 

CHARLES PETER EYNCII, Cleveland, Ohio (20911). Son of John and Sarah 
(Kline) Lynch; grandson of Peter and Esther (Brown) Kline; great-grandson 
of Abram and Alary (Wortman) Kline; great—grandson of George Kline, pri- 
vate Second Northampton County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES CRACRAFT MARSHALL,. Sidney, Ohio (20390). Son of Armstrong 
Logan and Margaret Marshall; grandson of Samuel and Jane M. Marshall; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Margaret (Cracraft) Marshall; great-grandson of 
Charles Cracraft, Major, Col. Daniel Brodhead's and Col. George Rogers Clark's 
Western campaigns, captured with Lochry's detachment, prisoner at Quebec. 

COOPER FENNIMORE McBRIDE, Youngstown, Ohio (20904). Son of Alex- 
ander Struthers and Maria Ann (McKee) McBride; grandson of Hugh and 
Margaret (Dunbar) McKee; great-grandson of Thomas McKee, private First 
Penna. Line. 

WALTER D. McKINNEY, Columbus, Ohio (20909). Son of George D. and 
Amelia (Cridland) McKinncy; grandson of William J. and Rebecca (Gregg) 
McKinney; great-grandson of Joseph and Eliza (Fithian) McKinney; great- 
grandson of George Fithian, private New Jersey State troops and Continental 
Army. 

JAMES W. MEEK, Columbus, Ohio (2090S). Son of William Tingley and Eliza- 
beth (Shankland) Meek; grandson of James and Elizabeth (Tingley) Meek; 
great-grandson of Isaac Meek, Lieutenant Ohio County Virginia Militia. 

LOUIS EDMUND MYERS, Marion, Ohio (20907). Son of William J. and Emma 
(Topliff) Myers; grandson of Louis and Dorcas (Bent) ToplilT; great-grandson 
of Abncr and Elizabeth (Williams) Brut; great-grandson of Silas Bent, First 
Lieutenant Fourth Continental Infantry.' 

GLENN RANSELDO PATTON, Youngstown, Ohio (19669)- Sun of Joseph Henry 
and Sarah Elizabeth (Darnell) Palton; grandson of James Monroe and Eleanor 
(Wain) Patton; great-grandson of Thornton and Sarah (Mclntear) Patton; 
great-grandson of George i'atton, Sergeant Third Uegt. Virginia Line. 

DANIEL GRANT SANOk, Columbus, Ohio (20398). Son of Daniel and Amelia 
(Cruser) Sanor; grandson of William Sanor; great-grandson of Michael Seynor 
(.Sanor), private Penna. Line, pensioned. 

GEORGE C. SCITAEFFER, Columbus, Ohio (20910). Son of William Henry 
Harrison and Catherine (Negley) Schaeffer; grandson of John Christian and 
Alary (Shuey) Negley, or Neagle; great-grandson of Philip Neagle, private, 
(.'apt. Robert Gray's Company L'enna. Stale Rcgt. of Foot, pensioned. 

HARRY MERRICK SEMANS, Columbus, Ohio (20399).. Son of William Oliver 
and Abigail (Merrick) Semans; grandson of William and Mary Warner 
(Oliver) Semans; great-grandson of John and Mary (Warner) Oliver; great- 
grandson of Alexander Oliver, Lieutenant Fifth Hampshire County Regt. Mass. 
troops; grandson of Roderick Smith and Emily Warriner (Bliss) Merrick; 
great-grandson of Pynchon and Sophronia (Warriner) Bliss; great—grandson 
of Noah Warriner, Lieutenant Seventh Company, First Hampshire County 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM W. SHANNON, Youngslown, Ohio (20382). Son of William Wilson 

and Sarah (Johnston) Shai n; grandson of John and Jane (Wilson) Shan- 

non; great-grandson of James Wilson, Captain First Rcgt. Penna. Continental 
Line. 

HENRY JEROME SIMPSON, Xcnia, Ohio (20914). Sou of Henry Allen and 
Ernestine (Senter) Simpson; grandson of Amos Edward and Mahala (Pike) 
Senter; great-grandson of Edward and Malinda (Cowdry) Senter; great 2 - 
grandson of Edward and Ruth (Reed) Senter; grcat 3 -grandson of Joseph Sen- 
ter, Lieutenant Colonel New Hampshire Militia. 

*9 












- 









2Q0 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

HARLEY WRIGHT SMITH, Columbus, Ohio (20913). Son of John and Eleanor 
(Pippitt) Smith; grandson of Paul and Lucinda (Larrabee) Smith; great- 
grandson of John Larrabee, private First New Hampshire Continental Regt. 

MARSHALL A. SMITH, Columbus, Ohio (10672). Son of Marshall and Elvira A. 
(Thrall) Smith; grandson of William Cooley and Mary Chase (West) Thrall; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Triphosa (Cooley) Thrall; great 2 -grandson of 
William Cooley, Captain, Col. John Moseley's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ETHELBERT ROLSTON SPRRRY, Columbus, Ohio (20388). Son of Albert 
Homer and Jcanette Bell (Miller) Spcrry; grandson of Harvey Lester and 
Nancy Spencer (Speaks) Spcrry; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary (Beaver) 
Spcrry; great--grandson of Peter Spcrry, private, Colonel Edmunds's Virginia 
Regt., pensioned. 

WALLACE NELSON STEARNS, Grand Forks, No. Dak. (Ohio 20393). Son of 
Horatio Nelson and Adaline (Munn) Stearns; grandson of Reuben King and 
Eliza Ann Munn; great-grandson of Elijah Munn; great 2 -grandson of Reuben 
Munn, Lieutenant Colonel First Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ROBERT C. TARHEEL, Columbus, Ohio (20383). Son of David and Nancy 
(Sallce) Tarbell; grandson of William and Martha (Stevenson) Tarbell; great- 
grandson of William Tarbell, private Seventh Regt. Mass. Continental troops. 

GUY TILDEN, Canton, Ohio (20394). Son of Daniel V. and Sarah A. (Jeffrey) 
Tilden; grandson of Mason and Sally (Blackman) Tildcn; great-grandson of 
Daniel Tilden, Captain, Col. Samuel McClcllan's and other Conn. Regts., pen- 
sioned. 

R. C. VANDERVEER, Middletown, Ohio (19673). Son of Tunis and Lydia C. 
(Molleson) Vanderveer; grandson of Benjamin and Jane Vanderveer; great- 
grandson of John and Anna (Bowne) Vanderveer; great 2 -grandson of Josepli 
Bozvnc, Corporal, Captain Waddell's Company Monmouth County New Jersey 
Militia. 

HENRY LEE WENNLR, Tiffin, Ohio (20400). Son of Edward and Susan 
(Thompson) Wcnner; grandson of William and Elizabeth (Strauss) Wenner; 
great-grandson of John George Wcnner, private, Captain Reitzer's Company 
Pcnna. Militia. 

RALPH ECKLEY WESTFALR, Columbus, Ohio (20387). Son of James and 
Helen (Eckley) Westfall; grandson of Simeon Westfall; great-grandson of 
Abraham Westfall, Captain New York Levies. 

JOHN C. WHELAN, Toledo, Ohio (20386). Son of William J. and Jane Eliza- 
beth (Hewitt) Whelan; grandson of Martin and Asenith (Bcardsley) Hewitt; 
great-grandson of Jcdediah and Elizabeth (Baker) Bcardsley; great 2 -grandson 
of William Bcardsley, private Fifth Connecticut Line. 

RALPH N. WHITFORD, Columbus, Ohio (20912). Son of James Wesley and 
Margaret (Rankin) Whitford; grandson of Cornelius and Mary Brady (For- 
sythe) Whitford; great-grandson of William and Mary (Brady) Forsythe; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Samuel Brady, Captain and Commissary Officer Penna. 
troops. 

EMMET M. WICKHAM, Delaware, Ohio (19665). (Supplemental.) Son of Kit- 
ridge II. and Marinda R. (Scbring) Wiekham; grandson of Asa and Sarah 
(Wiswell) Wiekham; great-grandson of Moses and Keziali (Woods) Wiswell; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Woods, Corporal Worcester County Mass. Militia; 
grandson of Josiah and Sarah (Adams) Seining; great-grandson of David 
Adams, private New Jersey troops, pensioned. 

RUFUS ITAYMOND WILKINSON, Nilcs, Ohio (20380). Son of Joseph Sattcr- 

ficld and Minerva Jane (Stoll) Wilkinson; grandson of and Iluldah 

(Davis) Stoll; great-grandson of Jonathan Davis, private First Essex County 
Regt. New Jersey Militia, and other service. 

RUFUS HERBERT WILKINSON, Niles, Ohio (20381). Son of Rufus Haymond 
and Adelia (Quackenbush) Wilkinson; grandson of Joseph Sattcrficld and 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS 29 1 

Minerva Jane (Stoll) Wilkinson; great-grandson of and Huldah (Davis) 

Stoll; grcat 2 -grandson of Jonathan Davis, private First Essex County Kcgt. 
New Jersey Militia, and other service. 

LAFAYETTE WOODRUFF, Columbus, Ohio (2039s)- Son of Israel and Sarah 
(McNabb) Woodruff; grandson of Timothy Woodruff, private Essex County 
New Jersey Militia. 

JOHN AUSTIN WOODS, Youngstown, Ohio (19668). Son of William and Mary 
(Sheehy) Woods; grandson of Daniel and Jane (McLain) Shcchy; great-grand- 
son of Robert McLain, private Cumberland County Penna. Militia; grandson of 
Daniel Sheehy, Corporal Eleventh Regt. Penna. Line. 

OKLAHOMA SOCIETY. 

CHARLES CLARFNCE BLACK, Lawton, Okla. (18953). Son of Francis and 
Charlotte Elizabeth (Brettun) Black; grandson of Archibald and Sophia (Cald- 
well) Black; great-grandson of John Black, Captain Worcester County Mass. 
Militia. 

LAUREN HAYNES BUXTON, Oklahoma City, Okla. (17731). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Stephen Andrew and Laura (Haynes) Buxton; grandson of Thomas 
and Mary (Wood) Haynes; great-grandson of Samuel (and Rachael Stanton) 
TIayncs, private,' Col. Eben Walbridge's Regt. Vermont Militia; great 2 -grandson 
of Thomas Haynes, private, Capt. Elijah Dewey's Vermont Company; grcat 2 - 
grandson of John Stanton, Adjutant Vermont troops; great-grandson of Bcza- 
leel Wood, private, Capt. Joseph Bellows' Mass. Company. 

CHARLES ELLIOTT CARPENTER, Oklahoma City, Okla. (1S95S). Son of 
Robert P. and Mary (Elliott) Carpenter; grandson of Samuel and Sarah E. 
(Montgomery) Carpenter; great-grandson of Peter and Margaret (Ramsey) 
Carpenter; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Carpenter, private North Carolina Mil- 
itia; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Wilson) Elliott; great-grandson of Wil- 
liam Irvin and Mary II. (Potter) Wilson; great-grandson of Hugh ]Vilson, 
County Judge, Northampton County, Penna.; great-grandson of James Potter, 
Member of Council of State, Major General Penna. Militia; great 2 -grandsou of 
Samuel and Mary (Orr) Ramsey; great ;, -grandson of William Ramsey, First 
Lieutenant North Carolina Militia. 

VIPLEROY S. FARIS, Okarche, Okla. (1S959). Son of John G. and Annie S. 
(Paris) Faris; grandson of Isaac T. and Rachel S. (Tones) Paris; great-grand- 
son of Ephriam and Rachel (Stark) Jones; great 2 -grandson of John Stark, 
Captain Vermont Militia, pensioned. 

JAMES MONROE HALL, Tulsa, Okla. (1S060). Son of Hugh A. and Hcttie 
(Ramsey) Hall; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Orr) Ramsey; great-grandson 
of William Ramsey, First Lieutenant North Carolina Militia. 

KARL S. HAMMER. Oklahoma City, Okla. (18961)- Son of Amos B. and Emma 
R. (Miller) Hammer; grandson of Augustus W. and Nancy (Bonner) Ham- 
mer; great-grandson of Peter Hammer, private First York County Regt. Penna. 
Militia. 

BRITTON EARL JENNINGS, Oklahoma City, Okla. (1895.1). Son of David and 
Laura Alvina Jennings; grandson of Solomon and Susan (Price) Jennings; 
great-grandson of David Jennings; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Jennings, private 
Seventh Regt. Conn. Continental Line. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR JENNINGS, Oklahoma City, Okla. (18955). Son of David 
and Laura Alvina Jennings; grandson of Solomon and Susan (Price") Jennings; 
great-grandson of David Jennings; great-grandson of Joseph Joinings, private 
Seventh Regt. Conn. Continental Line. 

CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Enid, Okla. (18950). Son of Henry M. and Clara 
R. Parker; grandson of John and Pcrsis (Follett) Parker, Jr.; great-grandson 
of John and Betsey (Jcwctt) Parker; great-grandson ol Joseph Parker, Jr., 
private, Col. Israel Putnam's Conn. Regt. ;. grcat a -grandson of Joseph Parker, 



292 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Sr., private Coventry Conn. Company in Lexington Alarm; great-grandson of 
Martin Dewey (and Persis Fassctt) Follctt, private Vermont Militia; great 2 - 
grandson of Eliphalet Follctt and great 3 -grandson of Benjamin Follctt, de- 
fenders of Wyoming Valley settlement; grcat'-'-grandson of Flam Jewctt, private- 
Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of John (and Hannah SafTord) Fassctt, Jr., First 
Lieutenant of "Green Mountain Boys," Hospital Commissary at Bennington, 
Vt. ; great s -grandson of Joint Fassctt, St., Member of Vermont Legislature, 
recognized patriot; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Saifor.d, patriot at Bennington, 
Vermont. 

GEORGE PIERCE RUSH, Enid, Okla. (18957). Son of William Marion and 
Olivia Carolina (Birch) Rush; grandson of James Harvey and Mary Magda- 
line (Miller) Birch; great-grandson of Thomas Erskine Birch, Ensign on John 
Paul Jones' ship "Bon Homme Richard." 

SAMUEL STEPHEN ARNOLD DOUGLAS STAIIL, Oklahoma City, Olda. 
(1S962). Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Staid; grandson of Daniel and Nancy 
(Fox) Stahl ; great-grandson of Henry Stahl, private, Capt. James Young's 
Company, Fifth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

OREGON SOCIETY. 

LYLE NELSON ANMACK, Portland, Ore. (19533). Son of Elijah R. and Matilda 
M. (Allen) Anmack; grandson of William and Sarah (Stout) Anmack; great- 
grandson of Tunis Anmack, Sergeant First Regt. New Jersey Volunteers. 

PORTER BONSER, Scappoose, Ore. (19545). Son of Uriah and Sarah A. (Coryell) 
Bonscr; grandson of Isaac aiid Abigail (Burt) Bonscr; great-grandson of 
Joscpli Bonscr, Second Lieutenant Second Northumberland County Battalion 
Penna. Militia. 

JOHN S. BRADLEY, Portland, Ore. (19529). Son of EH and Amanda (Ball) 
Bradley; grandson of EH and Phoebe (Bartholomew) Bradley; great-grandson 
of Jesse Bradley, Captain Twentieth Company Second Berkshire County Mass. 
Regt. 

ALLEN B. CROASMAN, Portland, Ore. (19534)- Son of James and Lavina 
(Brickley) Croasman; grandson of Joseph and Catharine (McHenry) Croas- 
man; great-grandson of James McHenry, Assistant Military Secretary to Gen- 
eral Washington and Aidc-dc-Camp to Lafayette, Surgeon Fifth LVnna. Battal- 
ion. 

WILLIAM HIRAM FOULKES, Portland, Ore. (19530). Son of William and 
Harriet Almira (Johnson) Foulkcs; grandson of Hiram E. and Lucinda (Mac- 
Arthur) Johnson; great-grandson of Johnathan and Susan (Burwell) Johnson; 
great 2 -grandson of Windsor Johnson, private, Ogden's First New Jersey Regt., 
pensioned. 

LAWRENCE IT. KNAPP, Portland, Ore. (1953:0. Son of Richard B. and Minnie 
A. Knapp; grandson of Auren and Sally Knapp; great-grandson of Caleb and 
Experience Knapp; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Knapp, private, \\ adswoi th's 
Conn. Brigade, prisoner. 

GEORGE LLEWELLYN IJNDSLEY, Portland, Ore. (19541). Son of Aaron 
Ladner and Julia (West) Lindsley; grandson of Aaron and Dorcas (Taylor) 
Lindsley; great-grandson of Aaron IJndslcy, private Morris County, New Jer- 
sey, Minute Men; great 2 -grandson of Silas and Abigail Hahey, Hospital Nurses 
at Morristown, New Jersey. 

BRUCE McCAMANT, Portland, Ore. 09530- Son of Thomas and Delia Mc- 
Camant; grandson of Graham and Mary McCaniant; great-grandson of James 
McCamant, Captain, Bull's Regt. Penna. Line. 

COE ALOYSIUS McKENNA, Portland, Ore. (19537). Son of Francis I. and 
Laura (Linebaugh) McKenna; grandson of William and Charily (Burgoon) 
McKcnna; great-grandson of Levi and Ann (Lilly) Burgoon; grcat 2 -grandson . 
of Jacob and Prudence Ann (Baker) Burgoon; great a -grandson of Henry Baker, 
Lieutenant Maryland troops. 



REGISTER OF" NEW MEMBERS 293 

JAMES GADDIS NICHOLS, Portland, Ore. (19535)- Son of II. II. and Emma 
Virginia Nichols; grandson of William and Elcathea (Cothran) Nichols; great- 
grandson of William and Margaritte (Griffith) Cothran; grcat 2 -graudson of 
Henry Griffith, private North Carolina Continental Line. 

JOHN BUNYAN RAY, Mist, Ore. (19544). Son of James Allen and Nancy Ma- 
linda (Burlinson) Kay; grandson of Amos I,, and Martha (Allen) Ray; great- 
grandson of John Allen, private North Carolina troops, pensioned. 

FRANK BENJAMIN ROBERTS, Bohemia, Ore. (19536). Son of William and 
Mary (More) Roberts; grandson of Joseph Roberts; great-grandson of William 
Roberts, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Battalion Bucks County Penna. Militia. 

BURCIIARD P. SHEPHERD, Portland, Ore. (19516). Son of Dexter and Louisa 
(Babcock) Shepherd; grandson of San ford and Desire (Spencer) Bahcock; 
great-grandson of Amos Spencer, private Albany County New York Militia; 
great-grandson of Joel Spencer, private Albany County New York Militia. 

IIELMUS WELLS THOMPSON, Eugene, Ore. (19542). Son of Clark W. and 
Rebecca S. (Wells) Thompson; grandson of llelmus M. and Harriet A. 
(Mackey) Wells; great grandson of Paoli and Ann (Munson) Wells; great 2 - 
grandson of Levi Wells, Major Twenty-second Conn. Regt. 1776, taken prisoner 
at Long Island, Colonel of Militia 1780, taken prisoner at Ilorseneck. 

LOUIS CLARE TOBIAS, Portland, Ore. (19538). Son of Daniel Sunderland and 
Sarah (Cockrbft) Tobias; grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Sunderland) Tobias; 
great-grandson of Isaac Tobias, Ensign Orange County Now York Militia. 

PENNSYLVANIA SOCI ETY. 

JAMES DEVECMON ARMSTRONG, Scottdale, Pa. (20275). Son of Thomas M. 
and Amanda Armstrong; grandson of James D. and Julia A. Armstrong; great- 
grandson of William and Hannah Armstrong; great 2 -grandson of James Arm- 
strong, Ensign Seventh Regt. Penna. Line. 

FRANCIS ARMSTRONG, Jr., Pittsburg, Pa. (20259). Son of Francis and Nellie 
S. (Wesley) Armstrong; grandson of George W. and Abbie M. (Holland) 
Wesley; great-grandson of Alexander and Mary (Barton) Wesley; great-'-grad- 
son of Phineas Barton, private, Col. Samuel Brewer's Mass. Regt.; great-grand- 
son of Nathaniel and Mehitable (Spooner) Holland; great-'-grandson of Joab 
Holland, private, Col. Nathan Sparhawk's Mass. Regt. 

JOHN BAIRD ATWOOD, Allegheny, Ta. (20254). Son of Moses and Jane Wilson 
(Baird) Atwood; grandson of Moses and Harriet Potter (Jones) Atwood; great- 
grandson of Moses Atzvood, private, Col. Joseph Webb's Mass. Regt.; great- 
grandson of John and Harriet (Potter) Jones; great-grandson of David Potter, 
Colonel New Jersey State Troops; grandson of John and Harriet (Clark) Baird; 
great-grandson of George and Jane C. (Wilson) Baird; grcat a -grandson of 
Absalom Baird, Surgeon, Col. Jcduthan Baldwin's Regt. of Artillery and 
Artificers. 

FRANK BEBOUT, Monongahela, Pa. (20779). Son of David Run ion and Dor- 
thy (McMurray) Bebout; grandson of Peter ami Isabel (Cooper) Bebout; 
great-grandson of John Bebout, private First Somerset County Battalion New 
Jersey Militia. 

WEST ELLIOTT PLAIN, Chester, Pa. (20783). Son of John and Ella Antoi- 
nette (Field) Plain; grandson of Frederic Mitchell and Keziah Henderick 
(White) Field; gi "cat-grandson of David and Mary Johnson (Nichols) White; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin White, private, Col. David Wells's Hampshire 
County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HARRY ANDREW FAULKNER CAMPBELL, Philadelphia, Pa. (20266). Son of 
F. J. and Sophia E. (Faulkner) Campbell; grandson of Winthrop Emerson and 
Nabby Adams Martha (Bixby) Faulkner; great-grandson of Winthrop and 
Mary (Wright) Faulkner; great a -grandson of frauds Faulkner, Colonel Third 
Middlesex County Regt. Mass. Militia. 



294 SONS OF TIM-: AMERICAN INVOLUTION 

EDWARD AARON COWLES, Pittsburg, Pa. (20780). Son of Charles B. and 

Carolina (Moss) Cowlcs; grandson of Aaron and Abigail (Hitchcock) Moss; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Rachel (Hall) Hitchcock; great-grandson of 
Joseph and Ruth (Hitchcock) Moss; great-grandson of /hnasa Hitchcock, Sec- 
ond lieutenant Second Battalion Conn, troops; great 2 -grandson of Bcla Hitch- 
cock, father of Joseph, private, Major Skinner's Regt. Conn. Light Horse; 
grcat 2 -grandson of Isaac Moss, private, Captain Nichols' Conn. Company. 

CHARLES IRVINE DAME), Pittsburg, Pa. (20269). Son of Samuel Page and 
Mary (Irvine) Dame; grandson of Charles and Nancy J. (Page) Dame; great- 
grandson of Samuel Perkins and Thcodate (Drake) Page; grcat?-grandson of 
Samuel (and Thcodate Drake) Page, private New Hampshire Militia; great 3 - 
grandson of Samuel Drake, private, Colonel Moulton's New Hampshire Regt.; 
great-grandson of Simon Drake, private, Captain Elkins's Company New Hamp- 
shire Militia. 

B. FRANK DUIvL'IFJ/D, Philadelphia, Pa. (20268). Son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
II. (Morris) Dufneld; grandson of Jacob and Susan (Wynne) Duflicld; great 
grandson of Thomas Wynne, Lieutenant Penna. Flying Camp, prisoner. 

SAMUEL WLILLKR FERNBERGER, Philadelphia, Pa. 09497)- Son of Henry 
and Julia (Wcillcr) Fernberger; grandson of Herman and Ellen (Ulman) 
Weiller; great-grandson of Simon and Sarah (Moyer) Ulman; great-grandson 
of John N. and Elizabeth (Marshall) Moyer; great y -grandson of John MarsJiall, 
Captain Second Penna. Line, pensioned. 

ALFRED MILLER FULTON, Coraopolis, Pa. (20261). Son of Joseph Miller and 
Sarah Anna (Brown) Fulton; grandson of James Jefferson and Nancy Ann 
(Ramsey) Fulton; great-grandson of James Fulton, Captain Penna. Militia. 

WALTER GABFLL, Philadelphia, Pa. (20267). Son of Columbus W. and Mary 
Frances (Weaver) Cabell; grandson of Cromwell Pearce and Charity (Richard- 
son) Weaver; great-grandson of Isaac and Frances Brasington (Pearce) 
Weaver; great-grandson of Cromzuell Pearce, Colonel Fifth Chester County 
Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ROBERT WALLACE GILMDRE, Dunbar, Pa. (19499). Son of James S. *nd 
Margaret (Wallace) Cilmore; grandson of William and Matilda (Eaton) Gil- 
more; great-grandson of James and Ann (McAllister) Gilmore; great-grandson 
of Whilcheld Cilmore, Lieutenant, Colonel Wingate's New Hampshire Regt. 

WILLIAM ROSS CORMLY, Pittsburg, Pa. (20253). Son of William Mowry 
and Lillian (Andrews) Gorml-y; grandson of James and Matilda (Mowry) 
Gormly; great-grandson of Philip Mowry; great-grandson of Cliristian Moiury, 
private, Col. Daniel Brodhcad's Eighth Penna. Regt. 

WILLIAM JAMES HARRIS, Chester, Pa. (207S6). Son of James S. and Emma 
Teresa (Morton) Harris; grandson of Benjamin and Catherine (Mitchell) 
Morton; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Bussier) Morton; great-grand- 
son of Aaron and Frances Paschall (Armidt) Morton; great 3 -grandson of John 
Morton, Signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

SAMUEL HELMS, Lebanon, Pa. (19491). Son of Samuel and Maria (Smith) 
Helms; grands..., of Peter and Maria (Phillips) Helms; great-grandson of 
Samuel Helm, private New Jersey troops, pensioned. 

LOUIS HENRY IIOLDEN, Maple Shade, N. J. (Pa. 20260). Son of Elnathan 
and Christiana T. (Vance) II olden; grandson of Nehemiah H olden, private, 
Col. Michael Jackson's Mass. Regt. 

ALBLRT BOURNE HOLMES, McKeesport, Pa. (20274). Son of Albert Dawes 
and Lizzie Jane (Bourne) Holmes; grandson of Johnson ami Mary R. (Edgc- 
comb) Bourne; great-grandson of Noah and Betsey Mason (Robinson) Edge- 
comb; great-grandson of Joshua and Hannah (Stone) Robinson; greats-grand- 
son of John and Jane (Lord) Stone; great 4 -grandson of Tobias Lord, Captain, 
Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Mass. Battalion; grandson of Zacchcus and Emily 
(Dawes) Holmes; great-grandson of Robert and Mary Paine (Bentley) Dawes; 
great-grandson of Joshua Bentley, ferryman at Boston, April 18, 1 7 7 5- 



REGISTER Oi' new members. 295 

HAROLD CLARK HUFF, Homestead, Pa. (20273). Son of Charles E- and Alice 
Elizabeth (Clark) Huff; grandson of Charles Gridl.cy and Arabella II. (Mat- 
thews) Clark; great-grandson of Charles Grandison and Elizabeth (Plait) 
Clark; grcat 2 -grandson of Shubacl and Ester (Tracy) Clark; great 3 -grandson 

of Joseph Clark, private Conn. Militia in defense of Danbury. 

STEPHEN ALEXANDER HUNTER, Pittsburg, Pa. (20258). Son of William 
and Ann Eliza S. (Heard) Hunter; grandson of Stephen and Sarah Ann 
(Armstrong) Heard; great-grandson of Stephen Heard, private, Colonel Por- 
ter's Lancaster County Regt. Penna. Militia; great-grandson of James and 
Ann (Stewart) Armstrong; grcat--grandson of Andrew Stewart, Captain Fifth 
Company, Tenth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

JOHN GILL JORDAN, Pittsburg, Pa. (20776). Son of Jackson Andrew and 
Agnes Herron (Gill) Jordan; grandson of John Loriman and Mary Smith 
(Waters) Gill; great-grandson of Asa and Kezia Paddock (Richmond) Waters, 
Jr.; greats-grandson of Asa Waters, private First Mass. Regt., Col. Joseph. 
Vose, pensioned. 

CHARLES W. KARSNER, Philadelphia, Pa. (207S5). Son of Charles and La- 
vinia (Millichamps) Karsner; grandson of James and Leah (Pcttigrew) Milli- 
champs; great-grandson of John Pettigrew, Lieutenant Virginia State Navy. 

RICHARD STANLEY KELLY, Monessen, Pa. (20784). Son of James II. and 
Nancy Ilorton (Gamble) Kelly; grandson of Robert and Rachel (Glasgow) 
Kelly; great-grandson of Samuel Kelly, private Penna. Flying Camp and Light 
Horse Rcgts., pensioned. 

CHARLES LAWRENCE KIRK, Pittsburg, Pa. (20777). Son of John Lawrence 
and Catherine (Gregg) Kirk; grandson of Aaron Thomas and Catherine (Cald- 
well) Gregg; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Miller) Gregg; great 2 - 
grandson of John Gregg, Lieutenant of Foot, Penna. Continental Line. 

WILLIAM JAMES KNOX, McKeesport, Pa. (10495). Son of William Franciss 
and Elizabeth (Kiddoo) Knox; grandson of David S. and Sarah (Barnes) 
Knox; great-grandson of James Franciss, private Penna. troops, pensioned. 

ALBERT WILLIAM LLOYD, Pittsburg, Pa. (19,198), Son of William and Mary 
(Miller) Lloyd; grandson of Edwin Winship and Elizabeth Remley (Ilughts) 
Miller; great-grandson of John and Mary (Robinson) Hughes; grcat--grandscn 
of John Hughes, Captain Sixth Penna. Battalion, pensioned. 

JOSEPH PEARSON LOOSE, Philadelphia, Pa. (20270). Son of Henry Clay and 
Virginia (Pearson) Loose; grandson of Joseph and Mary (Rickenback) Pear- 
son; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Wells) Pearson; great 2 -grandson of 
James Wells, Lieutenant Delaware Battalion Flying Camp. 

CHRISTIAN TRITT McCULLOUCH, Newville, Fa. (19493). Son of William 
Johnston and Tabitha (Tritt) McCullough; grandson of Christian and Lydia 
(Stough) Tritt; great-grandson of Peter (and Elizabeth Lcfcvre) Tritt, pri- 
vate Second York County Battalion Penna. Militia; great 2 -grandson of George 
Lcfcvre, Lieutenant Second York County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

JOHN SCOTT McCULLOUGH, Pittsburg, Pa. (19500). Son of Samuel an/ 
Mary (Scott) McCullough; grandson of John and Mary (Phillips) Scott; 
great-grandson of David Phillips, Captain Second Company, Seventh Battalion 
Penna. Associators. 

JAMES MARTIN,. Philadelphia, Pa. (7190). (Supplemental.) Son of John Bcr- 
wick and Mary (McCauslin) Martin; grandson of Samuel and Rachel (Cessna) 
McCauslin; great-grandson of Charles Cessna, Lieutenant Colonel First Bed- 
ford County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES ALBERT MEYERS, Newville, Pa. (2077S). Sun of Samuel and 
Catherine (Tritt) Myers; grandson of William and Catherine (Black) Tritt; 
great-grandson of Peter (and Elizabeth Lefevre) Tritt, private First Company, 
Third York County Battalion Penna. troops; great-grandson of George Lc- 
fcvre, Lieutenant First Company, Third York County Battalion Penna. troops. 



206 SONS OF Tlilv AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



' 



HARRY WESSELLS MYER, Pittsburg, Pa. (D. C. 1972s). Son of George V. 
and Ella (Brown) Myer; grandson of Daniel Warren and Catharine (King) 
Brown; great-grandson of Daniel and Mary (Wigton) Brown; great 2 -grandson 
of Thomas Brown, militia man at Forty Fort, Wilkes Barre, Penna.; great-- 
grandson of Thomas and Polly (Gaylord) Wigton; grcat 3 -grandson' of Junius 
Gaylord, private Conn, troops. 
SAMUEL LINDZpY NICHOLSON, Pittsburg, Pa. (20252). Son of Coleman L. 
and Mary Paul (Robeson) Nicholson; grandson of Joseph Paul and Elizabeth 
(Stroud) Robeson; great-grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Shoemaker) 
Stroud; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Stroud, Lieutenant Colonel at Fort Penn, 
Northampton County, Penna., Member of Convention at Carpenter's Hall, 
Philadelphia, July 15, 1775. 
ROBERT DAVIDSON NORTH, Connellsville, Pa. (20257). Son of George Wil- 
liam and Nannie (Payne) North; grandson of William Darke and Hannah 
(Gill) North; great-grandson of George North, First Lieutenant, Col. Anthony 
Wayne's Fifth Penna. Rcgt. 
ZACHARIAH BAILEY OGDEN, Crofton, Pa. (10256). Son of Zachariah and 
Elizabeth Ogden; grandson of William and Ellen (Self ridge) Ogden; great- 
grandson of Matthew and Elizabeth (Bloom) Ogden; great 2 -grandson of 
Danic! Ogden, Second Lieutenant, Harper's New York Regt. 
GEORGE ROSS PHILLIPS, Carnegie, Pa. (19496). Son of John and Sarah 
(Hilligas) Phillips; grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Williams) Phillips; 
great-grandson of Bazaleel Williams; great 2 -grandson of Olho II. Williams, 
Colonel Maryland Line; great-grandson of William and Rachel (Hamilton) 
Phillips; great 2 -grandson of Tliomus Phillips, private, Captain Blackburn's 
s West Nottingham Penna. Company. 

HARRY T. SAWYER, Pittsburg, Pa. (20264). Son of Harry C. and Katie I. 
(Thompson) Sawyer; grandson of Nathaniel Porter and Margaret (O'Brien) 
Sawyer; great-grandson of Benair C. and Catherine (Brooks) Sawyer; great-- 
grandson of Nathaniel Sawyer, private, Capt. Gideon Parker's Company, Col. 
Moses Little's Mas . Regt. 
HERMAN G. SCOTT, Pittsburg, Pa. (20251). Son of John and Olivia (Rogers) 
Scott; grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Watson) Scott; great-grandson of 
John and Mary (Phillips) Scott; grcat 2 -grandson of David Phillips, Captain 
Second Company, Seventh Battalion Penna. Associators. 
THOMAS SCOTT, Pittsburg, Pa. (20272). Son of Robert Rogers and Ann 
Elizabeth (Gisal) Scott; grandson of John and Olivia (Rogers) Scott; great- 
grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Watson) Scott; great-grandson of John and 
Mary (Phillips) Scott; great 3 -grandson of David Phillips, Captain Second 
Company, Seventh Battalion Penna. Associators. 
HENRY KING SIEBENECK, Pittsburg, Pa. (20255). Son of Joseph G. and 
Estclle (King) Sicbencck; grandson of Josiah and Mary Earle (IToldship) 
King; great-grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Wilson) King; great-grandson 
of Robert King, First Lieutenant Third Regt. Penna. Line and Penna. Light 
Horse. 
WALTER NEWHALL STEVENSON, Philadelphia, Pa. (19492). Son of James 
Hunter and Amanda Custer (Detwiler) Stevenson; grandson of Abraham and 
Ann (Custer) Detwiler; great-grandson of Joshua and Catherine (Allebach) 
Detwiler; great-grandson of Jacob Detwiler, private Fifth Battalion Penna. 
troops. 
GEORGE B. STICHTER, Pottsville, Pa. (20271). Son of Joseph and Ellen B. 
Stichter; grandson of George If. and Mary IT. Stichter; great-grandson of 
Peter Stichter, private, Capt. Charles Gobin's Company, Sixth Berks County 
Battalion Penna. Militia. 
THOMAS WATSON, Pittsburg, Pa. (20265). Son of Harry and Annie (John- 
stone) Watson; grandson of Samuel Parker and Margaret (Sutton) Jolm- 
stonc; great-grandson of Thomas and Rebecca (Laughrcy) Sutton; great 2 - 






. 






REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS 297 

grandson of Peter Sutton, private First New Jersey Rcgt. and Capt. John 

Walton's Company of Light Dragoons. 
THOMAS PETER WENNER, Allen town, Pa. (10.190). Son of Peter S. and 

Maria (Kramer) Wenner; grandson of George and Anna (Shiffcrt) Wenner; 

great-grandson of George Wenner, fifer First Battalion Nortliampton County 

Penna. Militia. 
CHARLES ALBERT WOODS, Scwicklcy, Pa. (20262). Son of George and 

Ellen C. (Crane) Woods; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Baston) Woods; 

great-grandson of Ainnii and Eydia (Oakcs) Baston; great 2 -grandson of Win- 

throp Baston, Captain, Col. Jacob French's Rcgt. Mass. Militia. 
LAWRENCE CRANE WOODS, Edgeworth, Pa. (20263). Son of George and 

Ellen C. (Crane) Woods; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Baston) Woods; 

great-grandson of Ammi and Lydia (Oakes) Baston; great 2 -grandson of Win- 

throp Boston, Captain, Col. Jacob French's Regt. Mass. Militia. 
DE WITT CLINTON YOUNG, Smcthport, Pa. (19494). Son of Arthur and 

Laurinda II. (Stull) Young; grandson of Joseph and Belinda (Bresder) Stull; 

great-grandson of Jacob Stall, Stall, Captain Second Sussex County Regt. New 

Jersey Militia. 

RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

WILLIAM ALDEN AUSTIN, Providence, R. I. (1SS19). Son of Edwin and 
Hannah (Webber) Austin; grandson of William Merrill and Rebecca (Gilbert) 
Webber; great-grandson of William Webber, private, Colonel Vosc's Mass. 
Rcgt. 

EDWARD RICHARDSON BALLOU, Providence, R. I. (20653). Son of David 
and Emily (Stetson) Ballon; grandson of George Colburn and Ruth Eliza 
(Aldrich) Ballon; great-grandson of Oliver Ballon, private, Col. George Peck's 
Rhode Island Regt.; grandson of Clement and Eliza (Richardson) Stetson; 
great-grandson of Bill and Betsy (Badger) Richardson; grcat 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Badger, Sergeant, Col. John Robinson's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

FRANKLIN ELTS1IA BURDICK, Providence, K. T. (18S20). Son of Brayton 
Daniel and Mary Ellen (Perry) Burdick; grandson of William Grimes ami 
Harriet (Tubbb) Perry; great-grandson of James and Ruth (Darling) Perry; 
great"-grandson of Thaddeus and Hannah (Berry) Perry; great :! -grandson of 
Benjamin Berry, Jr., private Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Dean and Rhoda 
(Savage) Tubbs; grcat 2 -grandson of Joel Savage, private Mass. and New 
York troops, pensioned; grandson of Daniel Joseph and Rhoda Lucinda (Sla- 
ter) Burdick; great-grandson of Llias and Phebe (Pearce) Burdick; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph Borden and Mary (Payne) Pearce; great 3 -grandson of 
Ephraim Pearce, Parce, Ensign Rhode Island Militia; great a -grandson. of 
Jezvett Boy n ton Darling, private Mass. Militia, pensioned; grcat : '-grandson of 
John Darling, private Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Daniel and Rhoda 
(Hopkins) Slater; great~'-grandson of Benjamin Slater, private Second Conn. 
Continental Regt., 1775. 

THOMAS WIRSON CHACE, East Greenwich, R. I. (18S24). Son of Isaac and 
Celina Ann Chaee; grandson of Maxon and Lydia Ann Chace; great-grandson 
■ of Maxelon Chace, Yeoman, Master's Mate on flagship of Commodore Esek 
Hopkins. 

FORREST GREENWOOD EDDY, Buttonwood, R. I. (18822). Son of Thomas 
Whitman and Sarah Gano (Smith) Eddy; grandson of Richard and Hope 
(Tourtellot) Lddy; great-grandson of Jonathan Eddy, private Rhode Island 
Militia; grandson of Waterman and Sarah (Corey) Smith; great-grandson of 
Junia (Jitni) Smith., private Rhode Island Militia; great-grandson of William 
Tourtellot, private, Peck's Regt. Rhode Island Militia; great-grandson of 
Illisha Smith, private, Brown's Regt. Rhode Island Militia. 

.MARTIN S. FANNING, Providence, R. I. (1S823). Son of Joseph 11. and Mary 
E- (Reynolds) Fanning; grandson of Uriah and .Mary H. Reynolds; great- 
grandson of Gardner Reynolds, private Rhode Island Militia. 



298 



SONS 01? TII1.C AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



JOSEPH HENRY FOSTER, Pawtucket, R. I. (2065c). Son of Samuel and Ange- 
line (Arnold) Foster; grandson of Olney and Eunice (Miller) Arnold; great- 
grandson of Israel Arnold, Sergeant, Col. Jabez Bowen's Regt. Rhode Island 
Militia, pensioned. 

GEORGE TIEEINGIIAST GORTON, Pawtucket, R. I. (18825). Son of George 
W. and Almcda A. (Tillinghast) Gorton; grandson of Pardon and Sarah 
(Waite) Tillinghast, Jr.; great-grandson of Pardon and Mary (Sweet) Tilling- 
hast; grcat--grandson of Charles Tillinghast, Recruiting officer for Continental 
Army at North Kingston, R. I. 

CARROEE BORDEN HODGES, Iloilo, Philippine Islands (R. I. 18818). Son of 
Charles L- and Anna E. (Borden) Hodges; grandson of Joseph and Eliza B. 
(Olney) Hodges; great-grandson of Joseph and Phebe (Smith) Olney; grcat-- 
grandson of Stephen Olney, Captain Rhode Island Continental Line, pensioned. 

GEORGE WARREN MADISON, East Greenwich, R. I. (18S21). Son of Joseph 
Warren and Maria (Smith) Madison; grandson of Alfred and Annie (Allen) 
Smith; great-grandson of Silas and Encrctia Allen; grcat--grandsou of John 
Allen, Commissary, Member of General Assembly of Rhode Island. 

WIEEIAM SHELBY RKED, Providence, R. I. (188 16). $on of James Hall and 
Anna Joseplia (Smith) Reed; grandson of Isaac Shelby and Laura (Green) 
Reed; great-grandson of Dull and Encrctia .Maria (Edwards) Green; grcat' J - 
grandson of. William Green, private Virginia troops. 

JOHN ORREN SANFORD, Providence, R. I. (20655). Son of Seneca and 
Emily (Hodges) Sanford; grandson of Newton Sanford and Eurana (Wil- 
liams) Hodges; great-grandson of Jonathan Hodges, private, Col. Isaac Dean's 
and other Mass. Regts. 

FREDERIC ESTABROOK SMITH, Jr., Pawtucket, R. I. (20651). Son of Frederic 
Estabrook and Adeline (Chancy) Smith; grandson of Preserved and Fidelia 
/ (Estabrook) Smith, Jr.; great-grandson of Preserved (and Eunice Wells) Smith, 

S'r., private Mass. Militia, pensioned; great L '-grandson of David Wells, Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Fifth Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of 
Joseph and Lucy (Cushing) Estabrook; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Cashing, 
private Mass. Militia; great'-'-grandson of Benjamin Estabrook, private Mass. 
detachment in guard of cannon at Lexington and Cambridge. 

HERBERT SHELDON TILLINGHAST, Naticlc,' R. I. (20654). Son of Sheldon 
II. and Mary E- (James) Tillinghast; grandson of Rodman and Martha W. 
(Place) James; great-grandson of John and Lydia B. (Spink) Place; great a - 
grandson of Phillip Place, private Rhode Island tropes under General Sullivan, 
pensioned. 

ROSCOl", CLIFTON WASHBURN, Providence, R. I. (18817). Son of Roscoe 
Stetson and Mary Kessendeii (Sayles) Washburn; grandson of Oliver Aldcn 
and Matilda (King) Washburn; great-grandson of Oliver Aldcn and jane 
(Keith) Washburn; greal"-grandson of I^cvi Washburn, Corporal, Col. John 
Bailey's Mass. Regt. 

LEWIS ANTHONY WATERMAN, Providence, R. I. (18811). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Franklin A. and Hannah (Eddy) Waterman; grandson of Cyrus 
Tourtellot and Eliza Ann (McGliee) EJdy; great-grandson of Richard and 
Hope (Tourtellot) Eddy; great-grandson of William Tourtellot, private, Lieut. - 
Col. George Peek's Rhode Island Regt.; ercat !: grandson of Jonathan Eddy, ■ 
private Rhode Island Militia. 

TEXAS SOCIETY. 

CLARENCE STUART BRATTON, Palestine, Texas (20753). Son of Napoleon 
B. and Minnie (Mason) Bratron; grandson of F.nocli and Mary Eliza Mason; 
great-grandson of William and Ann (Stuart) Masi n; great 5 -gi mdson of George 
and Anne (Eilbcclc) Mason; great 3 -grandson of George and Ann (Thompsoi ) 
Mason; grcat--grandson of George Mason, Virginia Member of Continental 
Congress, author of "l!ill of Rights." 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 299 

HENRY USE CARTER, Palestine, Texas (2075-'). Son of Edward Hill and 
Harriet Louisa (Rodgcrs) Carter; grandson of Beverly Martin and Carolina 
America (Minims) Rodgcrs; great-grandson of Briton and Mary Ann llankins 
(Edwards) Minims; great 2 -grandson of Charles and r.etilia Martin (Wade) 
Ivl wards; great ;, -grandson of Elisabeth Marshall Martin, patriot and nurse for 
wounded soldiers in South Carolina, had seven sons in the war. 

ARTHUR M. McEIvHANNON, Belton, Texas (16674). Son of Marcus and Nancy 
Causadia (Hancock) McElhannon; grandson of Cooper and Annie (Manning) 
McElhannon; great-grandson of John McElhannon, private, Colonel Chambers's 
Penna. Rcgt. 

ALFRED ERNEST WILKINSON, Austin, Texas (16675). Son of Winficld Scott 
and Frances Elizabeth (Sampson) Wilkinson; grandson of Henry Briggs and 
Nancy (Turner) Sampson; great-grandson of William Turner, Colonel Mass. 
Militia. 

UTAH SOCIETY. 

HERBERT BENTON BROWN, Butte, Mont. (Utah 19306). Son of B. B. and 
Louise (Gaither) Brown; grandson of Henry and Arianna (Hughes) Gaither; 
great-grandson of Daniel J. GaitJicr, Lieutenant Maryland Flying Camp. 

ROBERT WELLES FISHER, Salt Lake City, Utah (19309). Son of Isaac Mont- 
gomery and Sarah Jane (Vaughan) Fisher; grandson of William and Alice 
(Blocksom) Vaughan; great-grandson of Josepli Vaughan, fifer, Capt. William 
Moore's Company, Second Regt. Delaware Militia. 

ABBOT RODNEY HEYWOOD, Ogdcn, Utah (193 10). Son of Benjamin and 
Jane Abigail (Dennis) Hey wood; grandson of Benjamin and Hannah (Curtis) 
Heywood; great-grandson of Nathaniel Heywood, Corporal, Col. Artemas 
Ward's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Phineas Heywood, Member of Provin- 
cial Congress at Salem, Mass.; grandson of Rodney Core and Mary (Parker) 
Dennis; great-grandson of Samuel Parker; grcat 2 -grandson of Edward Parker; 
great 3 -grandson of John Parker, Captain of Lexington Militia, April 19, 1775. 

GORDON LINES HUTCIIINS, Salt Lake City, Utah (19307). Son of Alexander 
and Mary F. (Pclton) Ilutchins; grandson of John and Julia Ann (Fines) 
Hutchins; great-grandson of Levi and Phoebe (llannaford) Ilutchins; great 3 - 
grandson of Cordon Ilutchins, Lieutenant-Colonel New Hampshire troops. 

SAMUEL CULVER PARK, Salt Lake City, Utah (19311). Son of Boyd and 
Jane (Culver) Park; grandson of Samuel and Betsy (Pc ter) Culver; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Polly (Clark) Culver; great'-'-grandson of Samuel Cul- 
ver, Sergeant, Capt. Daniel Culver's Company Vermont Militia; greats-grand- 
son of Daniel Culver, Captain, Col. James Mead's Regt. Vermont Militia; 
great-grandson of Joshua and Abigail (Hall) Potter; great 2 -grandson of Wil- 
liam Potter, private, Colonel Phinney's .Eighteenth Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson 
of Andrew Clark, private Twenty-first Regt. Conn. Militia. 

LYNVILLE CALDER R1TER, Salt Lake City, Utah (19312). Son of Levi Evans 
and Isabella (Calder) Riter; grandson of Levi Evans and Rebecca (Dilworth) 
Riter; great-grandson of Michael and Elizabeth Riter;. grcat 2 -grandson of Mich- 
ael Rightcr, private Fourth Chester County Battalion Penna. Militia, died in 
prison, 1778. 

FRANKLIN SPENCER SPALDING, Salt Lake City, Utah (19303). Son of John 
Franklin and Lavinia Deborah (Spencer) Spalding; grandson of Edward and 
Lydia (Coombs) Spalding; great-grandson of Jesse Spalding, private Mass. 
Militia; great 2 -grandson of John Spalding, Lieutenant Mass. Militia. 

FRANK JUDSON VVESTCOTT, Salt [,ake City, Utah (1930S). Son of Oris and 
Catharine (McGrucr) Westcott; grandson of John and Catharine (Tain 
Westcott; great-grandson of Ira 2nd Julia (Fitch) Tai | ' ' •••and »n of 

Thomas Tanner, Jr., Second Lieutenant, Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 



300 SONS 01' Til 15 AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



VERMONT SOCIETY. 

HENRY EINCOEN BAEEOU, Chester, Vt. (10221). Son of William Sabin and 
Esther (Andrus) Ballou; grandson of John and Sophia (Sabin) Ballou, Jr.; 
great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Pickering) Ballou; greal 2 -grandson of 
Sctli Ballou, private, Col. Samuel Ashley's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

MONROE JAMES BARNES, Burlington, Vt. (19213). Son of Junius and Char- 
lotte E- (Nichols) Barnes; grandson of Comfort and Mary (Barnes) Barnes; 
great-grandson of Joshua Dairies, matross and bombardier, Colonel Crafts's 
Mass. Artillery Regt. 

WIEEIAM HENRY BURT, Captain U. S. Army (Vt. 19222). Son of Henry P. 
and Mary Elizabeth (Chase) Burt; grandson of Bartholomew W. and Rachel 
Allen (Clark) Burt; great-grandson of Bartholomew and Betsey (Woodward) 
Burt; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Woodzvard, private Mass. Continental Eine; 
great-grandson of Jonathan and Rachel Gardner (Pool) Clark; great 2 -grandson 
of Tliomas Pool, private, Col. Solomon Lovell's and other Mass. Rcgts. ; great 3 - 
grandson of Atkins (and Ruth Chcsman) Clark, Corporal, Col. Joseph Palmer's 
Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Samuel Chcsman, Corporal, Col. Joseph Pal- 
mer's Mass. Regt. 

EDGAR NEEL.S CARTER, Si. Johnsbury, Vt. (19224). Son of William Alexander 
and Mary E- (Hamilton) Carter; grandson of Wormlcy and Lucindn Washing- 
ton (Alexander) Carter; great-grandson of Wonnlcy and Sarah (Edwards) 
Carter; grcat 2 -grandson of London Carter, Chairman of Committee of Safety 
of Richmond County, Virginia. 

HARRY BAYEEY ClIAMBEREIN, Chicago, III. (Vt. 19212). Son of Ezra Bart- 
lett and Harriett Elizabeth (Baylcy) Chamberlain; grandson of Moody and 
Mary (Child) Chamberlain ; great-grandson of Remembrance (and Elizabeth 
I f Elliott) Chamberlain, Lieutenant, Capt. Frye Bayley's Company Vermont Mili- 

tia; grandson of Harry Croswell and Fucy Ann (Ward) Bayley; great-grandson 
of Isaac and Betsey (Johnson) Baylcy; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Johnson, 
Captain Vermont Militia; greal'-'-grandson of Jacob Bayley, Brigadier-General 
Vermont Militia; great 2 -grandson of Edmund Elliott, Captain, Hobart's Regt. 
New Hampshire Militia; great-grandson of Cephas Child, private Third Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

HOMER ABIAE FEINT, Montpelier, Vt. (19^5). Son of John Ilackett and 
Phebe Helen (Andrews) Flint; grandson of Abial French and Eucy (Chamber- 
lain) Andrews; great-grandson of Abel (and Mrs. Betsey Powers) Andrews; 
great 2 -grandson of Ammi Andrews, Second Lieutenant, Capt. Henry Dearborn's 
New Hampshire Company in Arnold's expedition to Quebec, taken prisoner be- 
fore Quebec, December, 1775, exchanged February, 1777, pensioned. 

JOHN WINTHROP FLINT, Montpelier, Vt. (19216). Son of John Ilackett and 
Phebe Helen (Andrews) Flint; grandson of Abial French and Lucy (Chamber- 
lain) Andrews; great-grandson of Abel (and Mrs. Betsey Powers) Andrews; 
great 2 -grandson of Ammi Andrews, Second Lieutenant, Capt. Henry Dearborn's 
New Hampshire Company in Arnold's expedition to Quebec, taken prisoner 
before Quebec, December, 1775, exchanged February, 1777, pensioned. 

JOHN CHANDLER GRIGGS, Bar re, Vt. (192x7). Son of John Chandler and 
Lydia (Bixby) Griggs; grandson of Stephen and Rhoda Bacon (Smith) Griggs; 
great-grandson of Stephen Cri^gs, Ensign, Capt. Caleb Clark's Company, 
Eleventh Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HARRIS EUGENE JENKINS, Kirby, Vt. (19211). Son of Milo and Amelia 
(Sanderson) Jenkins; grandson of Lewis and Policy (Griswold) Jenkins; great- 
grandson of Lemuel Jenkins, fifer, Colonel Wade's Mass. Ret. 

JOHN L. JEWETT, Bedford, Mass. (Vt. 192 14). Son of Myron H. and Abigail 
Jewett; grandson of Elea/.er and Dorothy Jewctt; great-grandson of Eleazer 
and Mary (Pratt) Jewett; great'-'-grandson of Thomas Jewett, Second Lieuten- 
ant, Col. Moses Robinson's Regt. Vermont Militia. 



REGISTER 01'* NEW MEMBERS $01 

MURRAY ABDIEl/ KENT, Montpelier, Vt. (19225). Son of Abdiel and Fanny 
II. (Curtiss) Kent; grandson of Caleb and Mary (Doty) Curtiss; great-grand- 
son of Barnabas Doty, Captain, Col. Ebcnezcr Sprout's and other Mass. Regis. 

LUKE PARISH, Randolph, Vt. (21051). Son of Jacob K. and Mary A. (Con- 
verse) Parish; grandson of Isreal and Anna (Smith) Converse; great-grandson 
of Isreal Converse, Captain, Col. Joseph Spencer's Conn. Rcgt. 

FERDINAND HENRY PEASE, Burlington, Vt. (19220). Son of Frederick Salmon 
and Mary (Henry) Pease; grandson of Peter Edward and Cordelia (Rich) 
Pease; great-grandson of Salmon and Matilda (Huntington) Pease; great a - 
grandson of Calvin Pease, drummer, Col. Charles Webb's Seventh Conn. Regt. 

JAMES WATSON WEBB, Shelburne, Vt. (1921S). Son of William Seward and 
Lila Osgood (Vanderbilt) Webb; grandson of James Watson and Laura 
Virginia (Crane) Webb; great-grandson of Samuel Dlaehlcy Webb, Colonel 
Third Regt. Connecticut Line, and on General Washington's staff. 

WILLIAM SEWARD WEBB, Jr., Shelburne, Vt. (19219). Sou of William Seward 
and Eila Osgood (Vanderbilt) Webb; grandson of James Watson and Laura 
Virginia (Crane) Webb; great-grandson of Samuel Dlachley W ebb, Colonel 
Third Regt. Connecticut Eine, and on General Washington's Staff. 

WIEEIAM HENRY WOOD, Burlington, Vt. (19210). Son of Henry Clay and 
Jennie Maria (Taylor) Wood; grandson of William and Delia (Hooker) Taylor; 
great-grandson of Seth Hooker, private, Col. David Wells's Mass. Regt. 

GUY HERBERT WYMAN, U. S. Army, Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. (19223). Son of 
Peter and Emily (Reed) Wyman; grandson of Abner and Abby Reed; great- 
grandson of Lemuel Reed, private Third Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

HARRY ADMIRAE BRINKEEY, Portsmouth, Va. (18587). Son of Admiral and 
Eaura (Warren) Brinkley; grandson of Admiral and Margaret J. (Saunders) 
Brinkley; great-grandson of Jacob and Abcelc (Griffin) Brinkley; greats-grand- 
son of William Brinkley, Captain Third North Carolina Regt. 

DECATUR O. DAVIS, Richmond, Va. (18588). Son of Archibald and Ircna 
(Thompson) Davis; grandson of Archibald and Margaret (Gilbert) Davis) great- 
grandson of William and Martha Davis; greats-grandson of Joseph Davis, 
Lieutenant and Surgeon Eleventh Virginia Rcgt. 

FRED. ELTON EMERSON, Cape Charles, Va. (18591). Son of James W. and 
Elizabeth M. (Brown) Emerson; grandson of Calvin and Freelovc (Beach) 
Emerson; great-grandson of Ccrshom Beach, private, Capt. John Smith's and 
other companies Vermont Militia in Gideon Warren's Rcgt. 

CHARLES CALLAWAY GUTHRIE, Charlotte Court House, Va. (185S9). Son of 
Eppa Dennett and Nannie Kate (Franklin) Guthrie; grandson of John and 
Martha Jane (Anderson) Franklin; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Calla- 
way) Anderson; grcat 2 -grandson of Charles .Callaway, Captain Virginia Con- 
tinental troops. 

GEORGE J. HOOPER, Richmond, Va. (18590). Son of George J. and Eliza (Fraser) 
Hooper; grandson of James Hooper, private Second Virginia Rcgt. 

WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 

EDWIN KEECII BROWN, Cle Elum, Wash. (20560). Son of John W. and Mary 

R. (Morse) Brown; grandson of Julius Gardner and Amarctta (Nicholson) 

Brown; great-grandson of John and Harriet (Brown) Brown; grcat'-'-grandsorx 

• of Daniel and Martha (Rogers) Brown; great s -grand.son of Daniel Brawn, 

private Third Regt. New York Line. 

JOHN GUY CAMPBELL, Tacoma, Wash, (18625)- Son of Guy and Stella (John- 
ston) Campbell; grandson of William and Lncy (Newman) Campbell; great- 
grandson of William Campbell, Captain, Col. Ebcnezcr I.carned's Ma^s. Rcgt. 



REGISTER 01'* NEW MEMBERS 301 

MURRAY ABDIEL KENT, Montpelier, Vt. (19225). Son of AbdicI and Fanny 
II. (Curtiss) Kent; grandson of Caleb and Alary (Doty) Curtiss; great-grand- 
son of Barnabas Doty, Captain, Col. Ebcnezer Sprout's and other Mass. Regis. 

LUKE PARISH, Randolph, Vt. (21051). Son of Jacob K. and Mary A. (Con- 
verse) Parish; grandson of Isreal and Anna (Smith) Converse; great-grandson 
of Isreal Converse, Captain, Col. Joseph Spencer's Conn. Rcgt. 

FERDINAND HENRY PEASE, Burlington, Vt. (19220). Son of Frederick Salmon 
and Mary (Henry) Pease; grandson of Peter Edward and Cordelia (Rich) 
Pease; great-grandson of Salmon and Matilda (Huntington) Pease; great 3 - 
grandson of Calvin Pease, drummer, Col. Charles Webb's Seventh Conn. Regt. 

JAMES WATSON WEBB, Shelburne, Vt. (19218). Son of William Seward and 
IJla Osgood (Vanderhilt) Webb; grandson of James Watson and Eaura 
Virginia (Crane) Webb; great-grandson of Samuel Blachley Webb, Colonel 
Third Regt. Connecticut Eine, and on General Washington's staff. 

WIEEIAM SEWARD WEBB, Jr., Shelburne, Vt. (19219)- Son of William Seward 
and Eila Osgood (Vanderhilt) Webb; grandson of James Watson and Laura 
Virginia (Crane) Webb; great-grandson of Samuel Blachley Webb, Colonel 
Third Regt. Connecticut Eine, and on General Washington's staff. 

WILLIAM HENRY WOOD, Burlington, Vt. (19210). Son of Henry Clay and 
Jennie Maria (Taylor) Wood; grandson of William and Delia (Hooker) Taylor; 
great-grandson of Seth Hooker, private, Col. David Wells's Mass. Regt. 

GUY HERBERT WYMAN, U. S. Army, Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. (19223). Son of 
Pelcr and Emily (Reed) Wyman; grandson of Abner and Abby Reed; great- 
grandson of Lemuel Reed, private Third Mass. Rcgt., pensioned. 

VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

HARRY ADMIRAE BRINKEEY, Portsmouth, Va. (18587). Son of Admiral and 
Eaura (Warren) Brinkley; grandson of Admiral and Margaret J. (Saunders) 
Brinkley; great-grandson of Jacob and Abcele (Griffin) Brinkley; great-grand- 
son of William Brinkley, Captain Third North Carolina Regt. 

DECATUR O. DAVIS, Richmond, Va. (18588). Son of Archibald and Ircna 
(Thompson) Davis; grandson of Archibald and Margaret (Gilbert) Davis; great- 
grandson of William and Martha Davis; great'-'-grandson of Joseph Davis, 
Lieutenant and Surgeon Eleventh Virginia Regt. 

FRED. ELTON EMERSON, Cape Charles, Va. (18591). Son of James W. and 
Elizabeth M. (Brown) Rmerson; grandson of Calvin and Freelove (Beach) 
Emerson; great-grandson of Ccrshom Beach, private, Capt. John Smith's and 
other companies Vermont Militia in Gideon Warren's Rcgt. 

CHARLES CALLAWAY GUTHRIE, Charlotte Court House, Va. (18589). Son of 
Eppa Dennett and Nannie Kate (Franklin) Guthrie; grandson of John and 
Martha Jane (Anderson) Franklin; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Calla- 
way) Anderson; grcat--grandson of Charles .Callaway, Captain Virginia Con- 
tinental troops. 

GEORGE J. HOOPER, Richmond, Va. (18590). Son of George J. and Eliza (Frascr) 
Hooper; grandson of James Hooper, private Second Virginia Regt. 

WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 

EDWIN KEECH BROWN, Cle Elum, Wash. (20560). Son of John VV. and Mary 
1\. (Morse) Brown; grandson of Julius Gardner and Amarctta (Nicholson) 
Brown; great-grandson of John and Harriet (Brown) Brown; grcat'-'-grandson 
of Daniel and Martha (Rogers) Brown; grcat 3 -grandson of Daniel Brown, 
private Third Regt. New York Line. 

JOHN GUY CAMPBELL, Tacoma, Wash. (18625). Son of Guy and Stella (John- 
ston) Campbell; grandson of William and Lucy (Newman) Campbell; great- 
grandson of William Campbell, Captain, Col. Ebcnezer Learned's Mass. Rcgt. 



302 SONS 01? TIM*} AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

WILLIAM WARREN COP-ELAND, Tacoma, Wash. (20570). Son of William 
Henry and Emma L. (Macdonald) Copeland; grandson of William and Martha 
(McCracken) Copeland; great-grandson of Asa Copeland, Sergeant Major, 
Maj. Ebenezcr Stevens's Corps of Artillery; great-grandson of Philip Mc- 
Cracken, private, Capt. Jonathan Holmes's New Jersey Company of Sappers 
and Miners. 

FRANK HAMILTON CROMBIE; Spokane, Wash. (20555). Son of William 
Hamilton and Adeline (Cheney) Crombie; grandson of John and Lydia 
(Clark) Crombie; great-grandson of James Crombie, First Lieutenant Second 
Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

GEORGF, ERNEST DIXON, Tacoma, Wash. (20567). Son of Benjamin Caldwell 
and Louise Marie (Johnson) Dixon; grandson of John Allen and Mary Eliza 
(Eddy) Johnson; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Allen) Johnson; 
great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Allen, private, Capt. Gideon Brownson's Company, 
Col. Seth Warner's Vermont Regt., pensioned. 

EDWARD W. EYANSON, Seattle, Wash. (20566). Son of Thomas E. and 
Amanda E. (Bran van) Eyanson; grandson of Thomas and Mary (McCloskey) 
Eyanson; great-grandson of John Eyanson, private New Jersey Line and 
"T'enna. Militia. 

RICHARD BROWN HARRIS, Spokane, Wash. (20575). Son of John Franklin 
and Caroline Bronsdon (Marsh) Harris; grandson of Lucius Bollcs and Caro- 
line Elizabeth (Mann) Marsh; great-grandson of Thomas Hartshune and Sarah 
Curtis (Bronsdon) Marsh; great'-'-grandson of Esckicl Marsh, Jr., Lieutenant, 
Capt. Caleh Low's Company Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Ezekiel Marsh, 
Sr., Ensign, Capt. Caleb Low's Company Mass. Militia. - 

LOUIS FOLWELL HART, Tacoma, Wash. (20568). Son of Thomas Jefferson 
and Harriet Shepard (Van Artsdalen) Hart; grandson of Lewis Folwell and 
Sidney (Gill) Hart; great-grandson of Joseph and Ann (Folwell) Hart; 
greats-grandson of Joseph Jiart, Colonel Bucks County Penna. Militia. 

STUART FRANCIS HILLS, Seattle, Wash. (18623). Son of Augustus C. and 
Julia (Litchfield) Hills; grandson of Elins and Abigail W. (Fox) Litchfield; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Olive (Pierce) Litchfield; great'-'-grandson of 
Delano Pierce, Corporal, Captain Butts' Company of Minute Men, Twenty- 
first Conn. Regt. 

ARTHUR HOOKER, Spokane, Wash. (20571)- Son of Thomas and Mary Louise 
(Dcnison) Hooker; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth Strong (Baldwin) 
Hooker; great-grandson of William G. and Melinda (Metcalf) Hooker; great 2 - 
grandson of Noadiah Hooker, Colonel Connecticut Militia and Member of 
Farmington Committee of Correspondence. 

ELWIN LINCOLN HOUSE, Spokane, Wash. (20562). Son of J. B. and Nancy 
J. (Fowler.) House; grandson of Abram and Nancy J. (Hodgdon) Fowler; 
great-grandson of Abner Fowler, Corporal, Col. Alex. Scammell's First New 
Hampshire Regt. 

HAROLD LESTER HULL, North Yakima, Wash. (20556). Son of Oscar II. 
and Elizabeth (Souter) Hull; grandson of Henry W. and Lydia Minerva 
(Hull) Hull; great-grandson of Samuel and Sabrina (Feall) Hull; great-grand- 
son» of Samuel Hull, Sergeant Wallingford Conn. Volunteers at Lexington 
Alarm, and in other commands, pensioned; great-grandson of William and 
Elizabeth (Price) Hull; great-grandson of George Hull, private, Captain Ste- 
vens's and other companies Conn, troops. 

CHARLES COLMAN HUNT, Tacoma, Wash. (20551). Son of Wilbur Harvey 
and Laura Frances (Sullivan) Hunt; grandson of Harvey Smith and Harriet 
N. (White) Iluiit; great-grandson of Jo epli Lockwood and Lydia (Davenport) 
Hunt; great-grandson of Theophilus Hunt, private, Col. Charles Webb's Ri 
Conn. Line; grandson of Absalom Colman and Charlotte (llotchkiss) Sulli- 
van; great-grandson of Andrew and Lama (Pangmon) llotchkiss; great 3 - 
grandson of Jason Hotchkiss, private, Captain Bunnell's Company, Fifth Bat- 
talion Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 



REGISTER 01- NEW MEMBERS 303 

WILLIAM DOUGLAS JOHNS, Seattle, Wash. (20557). Son of David and Ade- 
line R. (Trowbridge) Johns; grandson of Clement and Olive (Smith) Trow- 
bridge; great-grandson of PHhu Smith, EJnsign, Bradley's Battalion, Wads- 
worth's Conn. Brigade. 

'GEORGE ALBERT LOVEJOY, Spokane, Wash. (20561). Son of Thomas Lewis 
and Prudence (Yates) Lovejoy; grandson of Jeremiah and Betsey (Pratt) 
Lovejoy; great-grandson of Benjamin and Polly (or Mary) Pratt; great 2 - 
grandson of Bphriam Pratt, Second Lieutenant, Col. David Green's Mass. 
Regt., and other commands. 

ALEXANDER McCLURE LUPPER, Spokane, Wash. (1S610). (Supplemental.) 
Son of Samuel and Matilda J. (McClurc) Lupfcr; grandson of Jacob and 
Eleanor (Marshall) Lupfcr; great-grandson of Casper Lupfcr, private, Capt. 
David Marshall's Company, Cumberland County Penna. Militia. 

ROBERT OLIVER McCLINTOCK, Spokane, Wash. (20552). Son of Robert 
Scroggin and Sarah Jane (Smith) McClintock; grandson of Daniel and Louise 
(Scroggin) McClintock; great-grandson of William McClintock, private Eighth 
Virginia Regt.; great-grandson of Robert and Narcissa (Mills) Scroggin; 
great 2 -grandson of John Mills, Captain Ninth Virginia Regt. 

SIDNEY SMITH McCLINTOCK, Spokane, Wash. (20554). Son of Robert 
Scroggin and Sarah Jane (Smith) McClintock; grandson of Daniel and 
Louise (Scroggin) McClintock; great-grandson of William McClintock, private 
Eighth Virginia Regt.; great-grandson of Robert and Narcissa (Mills) Scrog- 
gin; great-grandson of John Mills, Captain Ninth Virginia Regt. 

GEORGE HENRY McKEE, Spokane, Wash. (20553). Son of George H. and 
Maria (Marshall) McKec; grandson of William and Louise (Stiff) McKee; 
great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (McClintock) McKec; great 3 -grandson 
of John McKec, private Sixth South Carolina Continental Regt. 

HERBERT W1IIT0N MEAD, Seattle, Wash. (20977). Son of Walton Viles and 
Lucy (Whilon) Mead; grandson of David and Esther (Bundy) Mead; great- 
grandson of Moses Mead, private Thirty-seventh Regt. Mass. Foot. 

WILLIAM ALLEN MEARS, Tacoraa, Wash. (20559). Son of William Allen 
and Sarah Jane (Maxwell) Mcars; grandson of James and Lois (Sprague) 
Mears; great-grandson of John Mcars, Sergeant, Col. Nathaniel Wade's Mass. 
Regt. 

SAMUEL MERRILL, Spokane, Wash. (20573). Son of George Evan and Susan 
Eastman (Putnam) Merrill; grandson of Evan and Anna (TIaynes) Merrill; 
great-grandson of Samuel Merrill, Captain Second Foot Company of Haver- 
hill, Mass. 

JAMES SCOTT MOORE, Spokane, Wash. (20574). Son of Martin Luther and 
Joanna (Beaty) Moore; grandson of John and Joanna (Valentine) Beaty; 
great-grandson of William and Joanna (Crane) Valentine; great 2 -grandson of 
Obadiah Valentine, private Essex County New Jersey troops. 

NOYES MOULTON, Seattle, Wash. (20569). Son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Frost) 
Moulton; grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Lord) Moulton; great-grandson of 
Samuel Moulton, private Mass. Militia. 

L1C ROY PRATT, Tacoma, Wash. (20564). Son of Thomas and Lavina (Ellis) 
Pratt; grandson of Asa Ellis, private, Colonel Willard's New York Regt., 
pensioned. 

GUY W. SMELSER, Seattle, Wash. (20558). Son of Tobias C. and Huldah 
(Wcatherly) Smelser; grandson of Kphram and Dorothy (Snyder) Smelser; 
great-grandson of John and Suzanna (Fluck) Snyder; great 2 -grandson of John 
Pluck, private Third Battalion Penna. troops. 

CULLEN KITTREDGE STURTEVANT, Seattle, Wash. (20563). Son of Henry 
Grew and Charlotte P. (Kittrcdge) Sturtevant; grandson of Noah and Ange- 
line (Cole) Sturtevant; great-grandson of Consider and Catherine Pease (Kel- 
lcy) Sturtevant; great-grandson of Consider Sturtevant, private, Capt. Na- 
thaniel Hammond's Company Mass. Militia. 



304 SONS 01' Tin; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

ROGER SHERMAN TRACY, Tacoma, Wash. (20565). Son of Charles Walker 
and Mary Elizabeth (Durkee) Tracy; grandson of Ebcnezer Carter and 
Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Mehitablc 
(Sherman) Evarts; great-grandson of Roger Sherman, Signer of Declaration 
of Independence. 

HARVEY D. TRUNKEY, Spokane, Wash. (20572). Son of Frank and Eliza 
(Power) Trnnkey; grandson of Dyas and Rebecca (Wright) Power; great- 
grandson of James and Eevica (Campbell) Power; greal-'-grandson of Mattheiv 
(and Mary Shelby) Campbell, private First Regt. Penna. Continental Pine; 
great 3 -grandson of Evan Shelby, Brigadier General Nortli Carolina troops. 

CARLOS HERBERT WEEKS, Spokane, Wash. (20976). Son of Corydon and 
Lucia Louisa Weeks; grandson of Samuel and Susan (Grey) Weeks; great- 
grandson of JosJiua Weeks, Second Lieutenant, Parson's Company First Nc\t 
Hampshire Regt. 

THEODORE J. WRIGHT, Kennewick, Wash. (18624). Son of James and Mary 
Etta (Jenkins) Wright; grandson of Theodore and Mary (Scott) Jenkins; 
great-grandson of Ira and Zelina Scott; great--grandson of Ezekicl Scott, pri- 
vate Eighth Conn. Continental Regt., pensioned. 

WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

WALTER FRANK CARR, Milwaukee, Wis. (2005S). Son of Francis Evander 
and Sarah (Pratt) Carr; grandson of Walter Valentine and Brucic (Cowdrey) 
Carr; great-grandson of Ezra and Mercy (Kilbourn) Cowdrey; great 2 -grandson 
of Nathaniel Cou'drey, Captain Second Company, Second Middlesex County 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

PERCY IIENRIQUES EVANS, Milwaukee, Wis. (20055). Son of James Arm- 
strong and Jessie Hunt (ITenriques) Evans; grandson of Emanuel Martinez 
and Harriot Daggett (Hunt) Hcnriques ; great-grandson of James and Harriot 
(Cutler) Hunt; great 2 -graudson of Richard and Hannah (Howell) Culler; 
great 3 -grandson of Thomas Howell, State Commissary Conn, troops. 

HERBERT N. LAFIJN, Milwaukee, Wis. (20053). Son of John W. and Helen 
M. (Daniels) Laflin; grandson of Norman C. and Mary (Josselyn) Daniels; 
great-grandson of Lavinus and Abigail (Spalding) Daniels; grcat 2 -grandson of 
John Daniels, private New Hampshire troops, pensioned. 

ROBERT WILLIS MARTIN, Jr., Milwaukee, Wis. (20059). Son of Robert Wil- 
lis and Laura Eugenie (Jordan) Martin; grandson of Luther and Emma (\\o- 
dcrfield) Martin; great-grandson of William and Mary Custis (ITamcl) Roder- 
field; grcat 2 -grandson of John William Henry Rodcrficld, Gunner Thirty-second 
Regt. Penna. Artillery. 

GEORGE WHITFIELD OGDEN, Milwaukee, Wis. (20051). Son of John and 
Jane Eliza (Gray) Ogden; grandson of Alfred and Mary (Olmsted) Gray; 
great-grandson of John Cray, private New York Militia, Member of Commit- 
tee of Safety. 

HENRY MARTYN OGDEN, Milwaukee, Wis. (20052). Son of John and Jane 
Eliza (Gray) Ogden; grandson of Alfred and Mary (Olmsted) Gray; great- 
grandson of John Cray, private New York Militia, Member of Committee of 
Safety. 

JAMES HARNEY STOVER, Milwaukee, Wis. (20056). Son of David Carey 
and Frances Macy (Harney) Stover; grandson of Gilbert Tennant and Char- 
lotte (Kyle) Harney; great-grandson of Selby and Hannah (Hopkins) Har- 
ney; grcat 2 -grandson of Jencthan Harney, First Lieutenant, Colonel Haslet's 
Delaware Regt. 

HOWARD VAN WERT WELTY, Mellen, Wis. (16975)- Son of Henry and 
Mary (Cadman) Welty; grandson of Henry and Eva (Wert) Wclty; great- 
grandson of John ll'clty, private York County Penna. Militia. 



REGISTER OR NlvW MEMBERS 305 

CORNELIUS WHEELER, National Home, Wis. (20057). Son of William and 
Eveline II. (Lewis) Wheeler; grandson of Martin Lewis, private Third Regt. 
Connecticut troops, pensioned. 

LAUREL ELMER YOUMANS, Mukwonago, Wis. (20054). Son of Henry A. 
and Lucy S. (Andrews) Youmans; grandson of John and Betsy (Smith) An- 
drews; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Webber) Andrews; great-grand- 
son of Joseph Andrews, private, Colonel Carpenter's Mass. Regt. 

WYOMING SOCIETY. 

SMITH BONSER, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20028). Son of Jacob and Catherine (Wool- 
ford) Bonser; grandson of Isaac and Abbigill (Burt) Bonser; great-grandson 
of Joseph Bonser, Second Lieutenant, Colonel Potter's Regt. Second Battalion 
Northumberland County Pa. Militia. 

ROBERT LE ROY HARRIS, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20029). Son of EH Clark and 
Susan Ann (Shaw) Harris; grandson of Guy and Nancy (Ellis) Shaw; great- 
grandson of Daniel Sliazv, private, Col. Peter Yates's Albany County New 
York Regt. 

WILLIAM ADDISON RINER, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20027). Son of William Wrs- 
ley and Anna T. Riner; grandson of John and Mary (White) Riner; great- 
grandson of Robert and Mary Pruesbury (Johnson) White; great 2 -grandson 
of Jeremiah Johns on, private, Colonel Cilley's New Hampshire Regt. 

FRANCIS EMROY WARREN, U. S. Senator, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20024). Son of 
Joseph S. and Cynthia (Abbott) Warren; grandson of Joseph and Susa>n 
(Willey) Warren; great-grandson of Ezra Warren, private, Colonel Latimer's 
Conn. Regt.; grandson of John and Cynthia (Flagg) Abbott; great-grandson of 
John (and Betsey Webb) Abbott, Corporal Sixth Mass. Continental Regt..; 
great £ -grandson of John Abbott, Second Lieutenant First Worcester County 
Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of George Webb, Captain Fourth Mass. Infantry; 
great-grandson of Ahimaas Willey, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

FREDERICK EMROY WARREN, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20025). Son of Francis E. 
and/ Helen (Smith) Warren; grandson of Joseph S. and Cynthia '.(AbbottO 
Warren; great-grandson of Joseph and Susan (Willey) Warren; great-grand- 
son of Ezra Warren, private, Colenel Latimer's Conn. Regt.; great-grandson 
){ John and Cynthia (Flagg) Abbott; great 2 -grandson of John (and Betsey 
Webb) Abbott, Corporal Sixth Mass. Continental Regt.; great 3 -grandson of 
John Abbott, Second Lieutenant First Worcester County Mass. Regt.; great 8 - 
grandson of George Webb, Captain Fourth Mass. Infantry; great 2 -grandson of 
Ahimaaz Willey, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

CLYDE M. WATTS, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20026). Son of Joseph and Matilda A. 
(Irey) Watts; grandson of Samuel and Hannah Watts; great-grandson of 
Thomas and Katherine (Frederick) Watts; great 2 -grandson of Thomas C. 
Frederick, private Northumberland County Penna. Frontier Rangers, pen- 
sioned. 



20 



Index of New Members and Revolu 
tionary Ancestors. 



Revolutionary Ancestors in Italics. 



Abbott, John, 305 
Adams, C. G., 214 
Adams, David, 290 
Adams, H. W., 243 
Adams, J. W., 252 
Adams, Jonathan, 252 
Adams, M. E., 243 
Adams, Samuel, 243, 264 
Alexander, Hugh, Jr., 243 
Alexander, Hugh, Sr., 243 
Allen, G. C. F., 252 
Allen, Jo J111, 227, 293, 298 
Allen, Jonathan, 212, 241, 302 
Allen, Solomon, 267 
Allen, William, 229 
Alley, Abner, 260 
Allison, William, 246 
Allyn, Simeon, 251 
Alvord, Rcuel, 21S 
Alvord, S. L., 218 
Ammerman, Derrick, 268 
Anderson, Bzekiel, 275 
Anderson, G. K., 275 
Anderson, George, 288 
Andrews, Ammi, 300 
Andrews, C. L., 243 
Andrews, David, 212 
Andrews, Joseph, 253, 305 
Andrus, Eleacer, 265 
Anmack, L. N., 292 
Anmack, Tunis, 292 
Anticle, Simon, 264 
Antisal, Simon, 264 
Antisdel, J. P., 264 
Antisdcl, Simon, 264 
Armington, John, 252 
Armington, Joseph, 252 
Armington, S. W., 252 
Armstrong, F. L., 218 
Armstrong, Francis, Jr., 293 
Armstrong, J. D., 293 
Armstrong, James, 293 
Arnell, S. M., 225 
Arner, Ulrich, 287 
Arner, W. P., 287 
Arnold, Israel, 298 



Arnold, Job, 264 
Arnold, Joseph, 257 
Arnold, S. F., 252 
Arnold, Seth, 252 
Ashbury, H. E., 246 
Ashlev, G. B., 231 
Ashley, H. S., 214 
Ashley, William, 214, 231 
Atkins, Robert, 276 
Atkins, W. M., 214 
Atkinson, C. S., 225 
Atkinson, Jo Jm, 22s 
Atkinson, T. H., 225 
Atkinson, W. IT., 225 
Atmur, M. A., 287 
At water, A. ]., 231 
Atwater, Samuel, 231 
At wood, J. B., 293 
Atzvood, Moses, 293 
Atwood, W. O., 246 
Austin, W. A., 297 
Averill, Daniel, 223 
Avery, F. C., 276 
Avery, Stephen, 276 
Axline, H. A., 287 
Axline, John, 287 
Ayer, Elijah, 276 
Ayer, M. A., 276 
Ayres, A. S., 235 
Ayers, Silas, 270 
AyleszvortJi, Jeremiah, 239 

Babb, R. W., 2^2 
Babylon, G. R., 246 
Backus, Stephen, 234 
Badger, Benjamin, 297 
Badger, C. V., 252 
Badgley, Robert, 273 
Bailey, Caleb, 219 
Bailey, Eliplialet, 258 
Bailey, G. I., 258 
Bailey, j. A., 214 
Bailey, James. 21 1 
Bailey, Samuel. 2T.1 
Bailey, 7 ho mas, 245 
Bailey, W. 11., 211 



307 «r*v 



3 o8 



SONS OF THIv AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Baud, Absalom, 293 
Baird, F. L., 235 
Baker, Benjamin, 276 
Baker, F. L, 276 
Baker, Henry, 292 
Baker, Samuel, 254 
Baldwin, Henry, 247 
Baldwin, Nathan, 222 
Baldwin, R. S., 276 
Baldwin, Samuel, 226 
Baldivin, Simeon, 276 
Ball, A d on i jah, 276 
Ball, J. C, 276 
Ball, Moses, 276 
Ballou, E. R., 297 
Ballon, H. L., 301 
Ballou, Oliver, 297 
Ballon, Selli, 301 
Banckcr, E. A., 264 
Bancker, Floris, 264 
Bangs, Barnabas, 253 
Bangs, C. H., 253 
Bangs, Lemuel, 278 
Banta, Abraham, 214 
Banta, B. A., 214 
Barclay, F. H., 225 
Barclay, F. W., 225 
Barclay, John, 225 
Barker, A. W., 253 
Barker, Asa, 260 
Barker, D. P., 231 
Barker, John, 261 
Barker, Jonathan, 253 
Barker, Jonathan, Jr., 253 
Barker, Zcbediah, 231 
Barnes, John, 269 
Barnes, Joshua, 301 
Barnes, M. J., 301 
Barnes, T. J., jr., 269 
Barnes, W. L., 264 
Barnes, W. M., 253 
Barter, A. G., 276 
Barton, Phincas, 293 
Boston, Wifithrop, 297 
Batchelder, Amos, 231 
Batchelder, E. G., 253 
Batchelder, G. IT., 231. 
Baxter, B. W ., 258 
Bayley, Jacob, 300 
Beach, Gcrshom, 301 
Bcall, A. B„ 239 
Be all, Thomas, 239 
Beardsell, G. R., 253 
Beardslcy, Abraham, 235 
Beardslcy, Curtis, 235 
Beardslcy, William, 290 
Bears, Timothy, 281 
Beath, John, 268 
Bcatty, R. O., 276 



Beaver, George, 28S 
Bebout, Frank, 293 
Bebout, John, 293 
Beebe, D. R., 218 
Beecher, T. B., 218 ' 
Beers, C. E., 218 
Beers, Timothy, 281 
Beggs, Edwin, 231 
Beggs, John, 231 
Beggs, Thomas, 231 
Belcher, Elijah, 253 
Belcher, Elijah, Jr., 253 
Belcher, Joseph, 270 
Belcher, Nathaniel, 270 
Belcher, W. P., 253 
Bell, Henry, 2x7 
Bell, T had dens, 2S1 
Bell, William, 230 
Bellinger, F. P., 285 
Bemis, H. B., 211 
Benedict, Jacob, 282 
Bcnezet, Daniel, 237, 238 
Bennett, A. J., 269 
Bennett, John, 2S6 
Bennett, M. L., 276 
Bennett, Matthew, 276 
Bent, Silas, 289 
Bentley, E. W., 241 
Bentley, Joshua, 295 
Benton, Bethel, 235 
Benton, G. W., 235 
Bergen, F. G., 241 
Berlin, Jsaae, 237 
Berry, Benjamin, Jr., 297 
Bessum. Richard, 252 
Bctts, Elijah, 277 
Bicknell, G. E., 213 
Bicknell, H. E., 253 
Bicknell, Luke, 2=53 
Bi dwell, G. F., 269 
Bigelow, B. B., 287 
Bigelow, David, 280 
Bigelow, F. L., 218 
Bigelow, Paul, 218 
Bingham, Calvin, 2S3 
Bingham, Jeremiah, 241 
Birch, T. E., 292 
Bird, C. Ii„ 218 
Bishop, R. A., 287 
Bixby, E. M., 212 
Bixby, Samuel, 212 
Bixby, Solomon, 212 
Black, C. C., 291 
Black, G. M., 231 
Black, John. 2<)\ 
Blackman, VV. R.. 276 
Blain, W. E., 293 
Blake, G. A., 239 
Blake, Harold, 225 



IND1SX 01? NUW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS 



30«J 



Blakeman, F. E., 219 
Blakeman, J. H. 219 

Blakeman, James, 219 
Blaker, C. J,, 231 
Blanchard, F. Q., 271 

Blanchard, Joseph, 255 
Blanchard, Justin, 2S4 
Blanchard, Ozias, 243 
Blank cnbaker, Nicholas, 242 
Blauvclt, A bra ham, Jr., 229 
Bloomer, Robert, 277 
Boardman, Joseph. 278 
Boardman, Samuel, 214 
Boardman, W. B., 214 
Boardman, W. K., 242 
Bogle, Roen (Rowland), 260 
Bonner, E. C, 212 
Bonser, Joseph., 292, 305 
Bonser, Porter, 292 
Bonser, Smith, 305 
Booker, I^ewis, 249 
Boone, C. C, 264 
Boone, Thomas, 264 
Booth, James, 235 
Boulden, C. N., 246 
Bourne, Shear jashub, 234 
Bouton, Nathaniel, 265 
Bovier, A. P., 276 
Bowcock, C. M., 231 
Bozven, Henry, 240 
Bozven, Robert, 214 
Bowers, W. C, 219 
Bowers, William, 271 
Bowker, Levi, 244, 246 
Bownc, Joseph, 290 
Boyce, J. B., 264 
Boyd, David, 243 
Bayer, Ozicl, 229 
Brackett, Joseph, 259 
Bradford, Gamaliel, 250 
Bradford, Gamaliel, 3d., 250 
Bradley, Abraham, 248 
Bradley, Alter, 224 
Bradley, E. E., 219 
Bradley, Isaac, 219 
Bradley, J. S., 292 
Bradley, Jesse, 292 
Bradley, P. B., 225 
Brady, Samuel, 290 
Branch, J. R. B., 247 
Brant, H. L-, 276 
Bratton, C. S., 298 
Bray, Isaiah, 229 
Bray, William, 229 
Bray-ton, Francis, 258 
Breed, Amos, 252 
Breed, Ephraim, 260 
Breed, G. H., 253 
Brewer, Gains, 254, 255 



Br inch, C. C., 233 
Brinck, Cornelius, 233 
Brink, C. C, 233 
Brink, Cornelius, 233 
Brinkerhoff, D. C, 231 
Brinkerhoff , John, 231 
Brinkley, Ii. A., 301 
Brinkley, William, 301 
Bristol, B. B., 219 
Bristol, B. ] 1., 219 
Bristol, K. IL, 219 
Broad, F. A., 253 
Broad, Timothy, 254 
Bronson, PJiincas, 233 
Brooks, Daniel, 225 
Brooks, David, 282 
Brooks, James, 238 
Brooks, John, 218 
Brooks, Zacheriah, 214 
Brothwell, Benjamin, 219 
Brothwell, O. 11., 219 
Brown, Asariah, 225 
Brown, C. T., 274 
Brown, Daniel, 301 
Brown, E. K., 301 
Brown, E. N., 287 
Brown, G. M., 235 
Brown, George, 235 
Brown, H. B., 299 
Brown, Jo Jin, 223, 250 
Brozvn, Jonathan, 214, 255 
Brown, P. G., 243 
Brown, S. E., 247 
Brozvn, Thomas, 296 
Brown, William, 272 
Browne, Nathan, 246 
Brownson, Richard, 237 
Bruce, F. r B., 229 
Bruce, William, 229 
Bruen, Joseph, 234 
Brunson, Asa, 233 
Brush, H. S., 277 
Brush, Jesse, 277, 2S4 
Brush, L. M., 277 
Bryan, George, 274 
Bryan, R. W. D., 274 
Bryant, C. M., 225 
Bryant, John, 225 
Bryant, Micah, 246 
Buck, C. M., 241 
Buck, II. E„ 287 
Buck, Joseph, 229 
Buck, William, 241 
Bultinch, John. Jr., 262 
Bulkier, Charles, 247 
Bulkley, 11. D., 247 
/?»//, Epaphras, 274 
Bullock, E. P... 2ij 
Bullock, John, 212 















. 









310 



SONS OF Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Bunting, William, 248 
Burchmorc, G. I)., 254 
Burchmore, Zachariah, 254 
Burdick, F. E., 297 
Bur dick, Thompson, 214 
Burgess, Blisha, 256 
Burgess, Joseph, 216 
Burgess, Nathaniel, 256 
Burgess, William, 256 
Burlingame, Wanton, 279 
Burns, John, 219 
Burns, W. F., 219 
Burr, C. S., Jr., 277 
Burr, T. B., 277 
Burr el I, David, 213 
Burr ell, Samuel, 270 
Burriil, llbenczer, 263 
Bur rill, Jo Jin, 263 
Burroughs, 1 1. R.., 212 
Burroughs, Joint, 212 
Burt, Samuel, 260 
Burt, VV. H., 301 
Burton, Josiah, 264 
Bush, J. M., 247 
Bushnell, Alexander, 239 
Bushnell, D. W., 239 
Bussey, B. F., 247 
Bussey, Bennett, 247, 250 
Butler, E. W., 231 
Butler, William, 231 
Buxton, L. II., 291 
By ram, Naphtali, 270 

Cable, G. \V., 254 
Cahoon, E. A., 274 
Caldzvcll, Alexander, 232 
Caldwell, F. C, 2\2 
Caldwell, II. C, 226 
Callaway, Charles, 301 
Camp, A. R., 232 
Camp, Abel, 232 
Campbell, Alexander, 224, . 
Campbell, H. A. F., 293 
Campbell, I. G., 301 
Campbell, J. T. !>., 235 
Campbell, Matthezv, 304 
Campbell, William, 301 
Camplield, (/. A., 274 
Camp field, Jabcz, 274 
Carhart, W. T., 277 
Carl I, Timothy, 280 
Carll, Z. J„ 277 
Cannody, b. h, 226 
Carpenter, C. E., 291 
Carpenter, Joseph, 291 
Carr, VV. F., 304 
Carter, Daniel, 258 
Carter, E. N., 3 00 
Carter, H. L., Q 



*8 



Carter, Joseph, 267 

Carter, London, 300 

Caj/fc, .//W, 233 

Casivcll, Samuel, 262 

Cath-ell, Levi, 246 

Cessna, Charles, 295 

Chaee, Maxelon, 297 

Chace, T. \V., 297 

Chadwell, Harris, 256 

Chamberlain, Jacob, 276 

Chamberlain, James, 252 

Chamberlain, Remembrance, 300 

Chamberlin, II. B., 300 

Chapman, Isaac, 263 

Chapman, Jcdediah, 227 

Chapman, W. G., 243 

Chase, Josiah, 2S7 

Chase, M. VV., 254 

Chatterton, F. J., 219 

Chcever, . Ibner, Jr., 254 

Chcevcr, James, 274 

Cites man, Samuel, 301 

Chessbrown, J. IT., 2S8 

Child, Cephas, 300 

Chip man, 7'. /\, 263 

Chipmau, Thomas, 263 

Chittenden, Cornelius, 227 

Choate, James, 254 

Choate, W. H., 254 

Christian, John, 211 

Church, II. J., 243 

Church, Nathaniel, 287 

Clatliu, Daniel, 212 

Claiborne, Thomas, 252 

Clancy, F. W., 274 

Clapp, A. W., 254 

Clapp, P. L., 254 

Clapp, Samuel, 260 

Clark, A. L., 219 

Clark, A. P., 277 

Clark, Andrew, 299 

Clark, Atkins, 301 

Clark, E. VV., 25-I 

Clark, I Hi ia It, 213 

Chirk, Upliraim, 260 

Clark, Gersham, 277 

(7<//i\ /.;!/.. 273 

Clark, Joseph, 214, 295 

(Turk, Paul, 2^4 

Clark, V. F., 269 

Clarke. II. b\, 271 

Clarke, J. T„ 274 

Clarke. J. T., 277 

( Jark,\ John, Jr., 277 

Clay, Samuel, 242 

Clayton, J. W., 247 

Clayton. Joshua, 247 

Cleveland, Alexander, 218 

Clifford, David, Jr., 262 



INDEX 01' NEW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS 



311 



Clifford, David, Sr., 262 
Clifton, John, 279 
Clinton, Charles, 240 
Cobb, C. H., 236 
Coe, David, 219 
Coe, Ebencscr, 218, 223 
Coe, J. N., 219 
Coe, James, 219 
Coe, Jonathan, 219 
Colbeth, II. L., 243 
Colby, Bcnaiah, 258 
Cole, E. K., 226 
Cole, vS. 15., 270 
( olc, Solomon, 270 
Colcby, Bcnaiah, 258 
Collins, Benjamin, 2S7 
Collins, G. J., 254 
Collins, M. E., 232 
Collins, O. E., 214 
Colyer, F. C, 277 
Colyer, II. G., 277 
Colyer, W. T., 277 
Compson, Thomas, 235 
Cone, Cephas, 267 
Cone, R. A., 267 
Conger, R. T., 288 
Conklin, Jlzra, 283, 284 
Conklin, Richard, 285 
Conklin, Thomas, 284, 285 
Conklin, 'Thomas, 3d, 284 
Conklin, Timothy, 278 
Connet, A. T., 271 
Converse, Isreal, 301 
Conyers, John, 229 
Cook, Ambrose, 264 
Cook, Archibald, 247 
Cook, Edward, 232 
Cook, I. E., 232 
Cook, Isaac, 2G4 
Cook, John, 232, 264 
Cook, Parker, 247 
Cook, Richard, 218 
Cooke, L. M., 219 
Cooke, R. Y., 264 
Coolcy, William, 263, 290 
Coombs. Joseph, 238 
Cooper, II. W., 214 
Cooper, J. E., 271 
Cooper, John, 271 
Copcland, Asa, 302 
Copeland, W. ,W., 302 
Corbelt, John, 234 
Corning, A. J., 247 
Corning, C. P., 247 
Corry, W. M., 229 
Corser, E. S., 267 
Corson, Benjamin, 231 
Cossit, Timothy, 233 
Costigin, L. J., 275 



Couch, G. S., 270 
Cozed rev, Nathaniel, 304 
Cowell, E. T., 254 
Cowlcs, B. S., 219 

Cowles, E. A., 294 
Coivles, Noah, 230 
Cox, L. T., 236 

Cracraft, Charles, 289 
Craig, F. W., 239 
Craig, James, 227 
Craig, Joint, 265 
Crane, 1 1. R., 27 r 
Crane, Israel, 226 
Crane, Josiah, 271 
Crane, Stephen, 254, 255 
Crane, W. M., 254 
Crane, \Y. M., Jr., 254 
Crane, Zenas, 255 
Cresap, Daniel, 232 
Crcsap, Thomas, 232 
Croasman, A. B., 292 
Crombie, F. II., 302 
Crombic, James, 302 
Cromwell, W. K., 247 
Crook, C. M., 288 
Crosby, Jeremiah, 255 
Crosby, W. S., 255 
C rosso n, Samuel, 240 
Crowell, D. C, 226 
Crozvell, Joseph, 226 
Crowl, H. B, 264 
Croxall, Charles, 249 
Culver, Daniel, 299 
Culver, Samuel, 299 
C unison, Thomas, 235 
Curtis, Agnr, 224 
Curtis, Benjamin, 235 
Curtis, FJiphalct, 283 
Curtiss, D. M., 223 
Cashing, Nathaniel, 29S 
Cash man, Joshua, 261 
Cutler, F. A., 267 
Cutler, Jonathan, Sr., 267 

Dallam, II. G., 247 
Dallam, John, 247, 248 
Dallam, Richard, 247, 248 
Dallam. Richard, 247 
Dame, C. I., 204 
Danenhower, E. B., 226 
Danenhozver, JoJni, 226 
Daniels, Jo Jin, 304 
Darling, II. D., 255 
Darling, J. B., 297 
Darling, John, 207 
Darling, Samuel. 255 
Das hie! I, Arthur, 248 
Dnshiell, .1. I, . 247 
Davenport, Samuel. 257 



12 



SONS OF TIID AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Davidson, Jo Jin, 229 

Davidson, W. H., 229 

Davis, B. N., 226 

Davis, D. O., 301 

Davis, Gabriel, 232 

Davis, J. W., 232 

Davis, 'Jonathan, 290, 291 

Davis, Joseph, 301 

Davis, Moses, 253 

Davis, R. G., 220 

Dawes, Thomas, 2r 1 

Dawson, John, 217 

Day, J. IY1., 255 

Day, Joel, 261 

Day, Loammi, 255 

Dayton, Michael, 269 

Deake, G. C, 244 

Deake, George, 244 

Dean, Ebeuecer, 245 

Dearborn, O. V. N., 255 

Z)r Groat, Jacob, 273 

Delbridge, W. II., Jr., 214 

De Leon, E. W., 278 

Dc Leon, Jacob, 278 

Dc" J^ong, Ulias, 241 

Deming, Jabcc, 268 

Denny, Henry, 278 

Denny, W. J., 278 

Derby, Jonathan, 213, 259, 260 

D<? Revere, Cornelius, 27S 

De Revere, Francis, 278 

Detzviler, Jacob, 296 

De Vine, C. N., 214 

Devoil, David, 261 

Devoll, David, 261 

Dewey, Jcdediah, 213 

Deivey, Martin, 292 

Dickerson, E. M., 278 

Dickey, C. E., 269 

Dickey, William, 270 

Dickinson, B. G, 267 

Dickinson, Timothy, 251 

£>*//, Daniel, 280 

Dilley, Ephraim, 239, 240 

Dillon, B. F., 229 

Dinsmore, M. L., 255 

Dinsmore, Robert, 255 

Dixon, G. E., 302 

Doane, Joel, 222 

Dodge, A. E., 2.14 

Dodge, Abraham, 261 

Dodge, Paul, 244 

Dod«e, Thomas, 257 

Dornback, C. W„ 239 

Doolittle, Ezra, 219 

Dorsey, J. W., 248 

Dotcu, Isaac, 256 

Do/y, Barnabas, 301 

Dow. Nathaniel, -iGc) 



Downer, Cyprian, 226 
Downes, John, 219 
Downing, M. A., 236 
Downing, Michael, 236. 
Doyle, Joint, 226 
Drake, A. G., 226 
Drake, J. C, 278 
Drake, Jeremiah, 2S4 
Drake, i\l. M., 2(1, 278 
Drake, Samuel, 294 
Drake, Simon, 294 
I >rcw, C. W., 267 
Drninmond, G. W., 2.14 
Drury, Ebcnezer, 255 
Drury, S. D., 255 
Dryer, C. R., 236 
Dryer, John, 236 
Dufnckl, B. F., 294 
Dnmont, E i\., 242 
Dunbar, II. II., 244 
Dunbar, R. S., 274 
Dunham, L. /■'., 276 
Dunning, Andrew, 239 
Durant, E. W., 267 
Dura ut, Edzvard, 267 
Dwight, T. P., 255 
Dwiglit, William, 255 
Dyer, Elk an ah, 215 
Dyer, Judali, 257 
Dyer, Judali, Jr., 257 
Dysart, John, 239 
Dysart, P. Le M., 239 

Earhart, H. B., 265 
Earhart, John, 265 
Eastin, Phillip, 234 
Easton, S. A., 230 
Easton, Samuel, 230 
Eaton, Brigham, 278 
Eaton, G. L., 278 
Eaton, Obadiah, 2=55 
Eddy, E. G., 297 
Eddy, Jonathan, 297, 298 
Edelen, Edward, 248 
Edelcn, J. W., 2^8 
Edie, James, 282 
Edwards, John, 266 
Edwards, Oliver, 275 
Egerton, James, 256 
Elder, J. E, 274 
Elkins, Thomas, 264 
Eller, C. A., 27 [ 
EMcrv, G \V., 212 
Ellcry, William. 212 
Ellery, William, 212 
Elliott, Edmund, 300 
Elliott, T. 1.. 248 
E/tfj, ./.v,/, 10^ 
Ellis. L. C. 255 



INDJvX OF N1;\V MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS 



3 X 3 



Ellsworth, E. P., 220 

Elwell, F. E., 271 

Ely, Addison, 271 

Ely, C. W., 24S 

Ely, Levi, 271, 272 

Ely, Robert, 248 

Ely, S. D., 272 

Ely, S. H., 272 

Emerson, F. E., 301 

Emery, E. E'., 288^ 

Emmons, Benjamin, 253 

Ensign, John, 287 

Erskine, W. A., 226 

Ervin, C. E., 236 

Ervin, S. B., 232 

Erwin, Arthur, 278, 280, 283, 285 

Erwin, H. A., 27S 

Estabfook, Benjamin, 298 

Estes, Nathaniel, 256 

Eubank, Archillcs, 214 

Eubank, W. H., 214 

Evans, P. IL, 304 

Everett, Jeremiah, 255 

Everett, Josiah, Jr., 245 

Everett, Samuel, 255 

Evcrhart, George, 2S6 

Everts, Daniel, 280 

Tlwalt, Henry, 212 

Kwalt, J. II., 2.1 j 

Ezvcll, James, 282 

Evving, G. II., 214 

Ewing, Harvey, 248 

Eyanson, E. W., 302 

Eyanson, John, 302 

Fairbanks, Asa, 203 
Fanning, Charles, 222 
["aiming, M. S., 298 
Earis, V. S., 291 
Farlee, G. R., 220 
Farmer, G. S., 232 
Farmer, II. II'., 232 
Farmer, W. L., 232 
Farnsivorth, Reuben, 267 
Farrand, Be thud, 272 
Farrar, Ephraim, 271 
Farringtan, William, 263 
Farvveil, L. C., 2^6 
Fassett, J. S., 278 
E asset t, John, Jr., 202 
Fassett, John, Sr., 292 
Faulkner, Francis, 293 
Faville, E. PC, 239 
Faville, John, 239 
Fay, J. M., 256 
Fay, Timothy, 256 
Fcdder, Jacob, 226 
Fcrnald, John, 259 
Fcrnbergcr, S. W., 294 



. j 1 
256 

2)8 

. 303 



Ficklin, John, 215 
Ficklin, W. H., 215 
Field, E. B., Jr., 215 
Field, Elisha, Jr., 241 
Field, Elisha, Sr., 241 
Field, 11. \V., 256 
Field, Jonathan, 256 
Fife, W. J., 212 
Find lav, Samuel, 23S 
Fish, E. L. V., 278 
Fisher, R. W„ 299 
Fitliiau, George, 289 
Fleming, John, Jr., 250 
Fleming, John, Sr., 250 
Flenner, I. B., 236 
Fletcher, Archibald, 226 
Fletcher, Ebenezer, 232 
Fleteher, F. F., 226 
Fletcher, L. ]., 232 
Flint, C. C, 256 
Flint, If. A., -}oo 
Flint, J. I., 
Flint, J. W. 
Flint, Miles 
Fluck, JoJni 
Fogg, Reuben, 243 
Follett, Benjamin, 292 
Follett, Charles, 2S8 
Follett, Eliphalet, 288, 292 
Polsoni, 1 1. C., 2.(4 
Foote, Elijah, 242 
Foote, S. M., 242 
Forbes, J. R., 215 
Forbes, John, 214, 215 
Force, Thomas, 273 
Ford, Jacob, 280 
Forney, Peter, 226 
Forse, 'Tlw mas, 273 
Forster, Jo Jin, 230 
Forsyth, W. PI., Jr., 248 
Foster, J. II., 298 
Fonlkes, VV. PI., 292 
F oielc r, Abner, 302 
Fox, Christopher, 232 
Fo.r, David, 256 
Fox, Harry, 232 
Fox, W. \\\, 256 
Franciss, James, 295 
Frederick, T. C, 365 
Freeman, Comfort, 253 
French, David, Sr., 267 
French, W. A., 207 
French, W. H., 232 
Frisbie, Amos, 287 
Frost, L. E., 220 
Frost, Winihrop, 226 
Fry*?, Abraham, 2.|2 
Fry?, Joseph, 257 
Fugard, J. 1 1., 239 



3'4 



sons oi? Tin; American revolution 



Fugard, Samuel, 239 
Fuller, C. A., 212 
Fuller, Edward, 267 
Fuller, ISnoeh, 244 
Fuller, Jonathan, 212 
Fuller, N. K., 244 
Fuller, Noah, 235 
Fulton, A. i\L, 294 
Fulton, James, 294 
Funnell, W. S., 27S 
J'urnal, John, 259 

Cabell, Walter, 294 
Gaither, C. D., 248 
Gail her, D J., 299 
Gaither, T. H., Jr., 248 
Gale, Isaae, Jr., 2T4 
Gallond, J. M., 220 
Gallond, Jeremiah, 220 
Galloway, James, 213 
Gano, John, 236 
Gardner, Benjamin, 261 
Gardner, J. G., 239 
Gardner, Samuel, 2^9 
Garfield, J. F. D, 256 
Garretson, S. G., 272 
Gatchell, M. H., 278 
Gay lord, Julius, 296 
Genung, Ananias, 272 
Genung, H. J., 272 
Gcyer, John, 216 
Gibson, David, 275 
Gibson, Jsaac, 275 
Gibson, John, 215, 225 
Gibson, Robert, 225 
Gilbert, Benjamin, 236 
Gilbert, Edward, 236 
Gildersleeve, A. B., 279 
Giles, Thomas, 217 
Gill, Thomas, 217 
Gillen, J. F, 288 
Gillette, Benoui, 266 
Gihnor, Samuel, 244 
Gihnore, P. P., 244 
Gil more, R. W., 294 
Gihnore, Samuel, 244 
Gihnore, White-field, 294 
Gils o)i, ll'illium, 243 
Gipson, John, 215 
Glasby, F. F., 272 
Glasby, J. F., 272 
Goddard, Nathaniel, 274 
Godman, Samuel, 249, 251 
Goldsborough, A. S., 2.jS 
Goldthwait, E. O., 256 
Goldthwait, F. F., 256 
Goldthwait, William, 256 
Goode, P. B., 226 
Goodrich, A. C., 220 



Goodyear, Thcophilus, 2/9 
Gould, Joseph, 2_i5 
Gorham, J. F., 220 
Gormly, W. R., 204 
Gorton, G. T., 298 
Gotwalt, Andrew, 287 
Gotwalt, Jaeob, 287 
Gould, Ezra, 226 
Gould, Jaeob, 268 
Gould, Silas, 212 
Gould, Thomas, 268 
Graham, Andrew, 223 
Graham, G. hi., 256 
Graves, F. P., 233 
Gray, C. P., 279 
Gray, F. A., 256 
Gray, John, 304 
Greeley, Joseph, Sr., 239 
Grcely, Fliphalet, 243 
Green., F. V., 236 
Green, Thomas, 236, 257 
Green, William, 298 
Grcenazvalt, P. L., 228 
Greene, Clearer, 233 
Greene, H. R., 220 
Greenleaf, E. O., 244 
Greenleaf, John, 244 
Greenwood, Bartlee, 241 
Greenwood, G. W., 241 
Gregg, D. B, 268 
Greqij, John, 295 
Gregg, W. T. S., 265 
Griffin, John, 276 
Griffith, Grcenherry, 213 
Griffith, Henry, 293 
Griggs, J. C\, 300 
Griggs, Stephen, 300 
Grimes, Moses, 283 
Grindall, C. S., 248 
Griswold, White, 223 
Guthrie, C. C., 301 
Guthrie, J. A., 279 
Gwathmcy, Owen, 242 

Hale, S. IT., 279 
Hall, D. A., 236 
Hall, E. M., Jr., 288 
Hall, F. W., 220, 257 
Hall, G. W., 236 
Hall, Jsaae, 24 s 
Hall, I. H., 248 
Hall, J. M, 291 
1 fall, John, 227 
Hall, Nathaniel, Jr., 227 
Hall, Samuel 266 
Hallett, Elisha, 244 
Halligan, VV. E., 220 
Halscy, Abigail, 202 
Halscy, Silas, 292 



INDKX OP NlCW M1SMBICRS AND ANCESTORS 



3^5 



Halstcad, Samuel, 270 
Hamilton, F. W., 257 
Hamilton, H. H., 288 
Hamilton, William, 257 
Hammer, K. S., 291 
Hammer ', Peter, 291 
Hammond, Benjamin, 238 
Hand, John, 272 
Handy, George, 248 
Ilanscom, Aaron, 244 
Hanscom, L. O., 244 
Harlan, Jonathan, 288 
Harney, Jenctlian, 304 
Harrington, Moses, 225 
Harrington, R. L., 279 
Harrington, Thomas, 279 
Harris, C. C, 24S 
Harris, John, 240 
Harris, R. B., 302 
Harris, R. L. R., 305 
Harris, T. If., 229 
Harris, W. J., 294 
Harrison, B. Ii., 227 
Harrison, Richard, 227 
Hart, David, 269 
Hart, Joseph, 302 
Hart, L. F., 302 
Hart, Thomas, 222 
Hart, W. I-L, 220 
Hart, W. P., 236 
Hartley, G. B. K., 279 
Harvey, Edward, 233 
Hastings, John, 233 
1 r«istings, S. M., 233 
Hatfield, Aaron, 272 
Hatfield, H. D., 272 
Hawes, Pcletiah, 271 
Hazvcs, Solomon, 271 
Iiawkes, A. A., 257 
Haivkes, Adam, 2S7 
I-Iawkes, C. H., 210 
iiawkes, E. B., 257 
Hawkins, Samuel, 237 
Hawley, S. E., 220 
Haws, Solomon, 271 
Hay, John, 271 
Hoyden, Josiah, 244 
Hayes, Andrew,- 233 
Hayes, Eaekiah, 233 
I fayes, P. C, 233 
Haynes, Samuel, 291 
Haynes, Thomas, 291 
Hays, James, 247 
Flayt, J. 1\, 279 
Hayt, Stephen, 279. 283 
Hayzvard, Jacob, 228 
Hasclton, Joseph, 2.\ \ 
Heald, Ephraim, 271 
Heard, Stephen, 295 



Heaton, A. G., 279 
Heaton, Isaac, 240 
Eieckman, G. C, 236 
Hedges, Joseph, 242 
Heermans, \V. J., 279 
Helm, Samuel, 294 
Helms, Samuel, 294 
Heminway, II. A., 279 
Hempstead, Joshua, 231 
Hempstead, William, 231 
Hendrick, A. C, 220 
J{ cud rick, Coe, 220 
Hendrickson, C. W., 279 
Hendrickson, G. C, 279 
Henry, William, Jr., 282 
Her rick, Jason, 262 
Jlerrick, Zebulon, 262 
Hcrron, Thomas, 232 
Heselton, G. W., 244 
Heselton, Joseph, 244 
H 'est on, E. W ., 267 
Heywood, A. R., 299 
Heywood, Nathaniel, 299 
Heyivood, Phineas, 299 
Hickox, N. B., 233 
Higbec, W. E., 233 
Higbv, Seward, 239 
Hill,"D. E., 2S7 
Hill, F. M., 279 
Hill, G. V., 270 
Hill, George, 2S0 
Hill, J. P., 244 
Hill, Jonathan, 245 
Hillman, Lot, 256 
Hillman, S. ]., 242 
Mills, S. F., 302 
Hilton, John, 2_|5 
Hilton, V. D„ 245 
Hilton, William, 245 
Hinckley, II. D., 257 
Hinckley, Sylvauus, 2=7 
Hine, Noble, 288 
Hine, S. K„ 288 
Hinsdale, Joseph, 266 
Hitchcock, Amasa, 291 
Hitch cock, Pehi, 294 
Hitchcock, David, 220 
JJ it chins, Daniel, 214 
1 rite, I). M., 249 
Hitc, Isaac, 249 
Mix, 11. I., 245 
Hoadley, C. E., 221 
I [odgdon, C. E., 2=57 
Hodgdon. Caleb, 257, 268 
Hodge, Philo. 224 
Hodges, C. I'... 298 
Hodges, E. M.. 236 
Hodges, Jonathan, 236, 298 
Ilodgman, Benjamin, j^h 



3i6 



SONS 01' Till' AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Hull man, Philip, 287 
//o/7, David, 232 
/-/o//, Stephen, 259 
Holbrook, D. G., 221 
Holbrook, Daniel, 221 
Holbrook, J. H.", 221 
Holden, E. P., Jr., 272 
Hoi den, Horace, 272 
Holden, P. II., 291 
H olden, Levi, 272 
Holden, Nehcmiah, 294 
Holland, Jacob, 293 
Plolliday, I. G., 230 
Holliday, W. P., 265 
1 Iolmcs, A. B., 294 
J rolmes, A. L,., 265 
If alines, Ubcnczer, 257 
Holmes, Joseph, 216 
.1 L'olmes, P. J., 257 
I [(dines, Samuel, 257 
Holmes, W. B., 257 
Hoi smaii, H. B., 239 
Holsman, J. D., 240 
Holtenhouse, E. P., 215 
Hooker, Arthur, 302 
Hooker, Noadiah, 302 
Hooker, Seth, 301 
Hooper, G. J., 301 
Hooper, James, 301 
II 00 per, Samuel, 258 
Home, G. E., 215 
Horsford, Jeremiah, Jr., 275 
Horton, Rufus, 245 
Hosmer, Jonas, 252 
Hosmer, Stephen, 247 
Hotchkiss, Caleb, 224 
Hotchkiss, F. De W., 221 
Hotchkiss, Gideon, 221 
Hotchkiss, Jason, 302 
Houghton, A. A., 280 
Houghton, A. B., 280 
Houghton, Jonathan, 280 
Houlton, W. H., 268 
House, E. L., 302 
Hovcy, C. ]., 236 
Hovcy, Samuel, 236 
Hozuard, Daniel, 244 
Howard, S. W., 227 
Howe, PI. W., 288 
Howe, J. B., 280 
Howell, C. E., 280 
Hozvell, George, 280 
Howell, Nathaniel, 278 
Hozvell, Hi mas, 304 
Howell, W. K., 272 
Hozvland, Daniel, Jr., 261 
Hoyt, Charles, 288 
Hoyt, David, 232 
Hoyt, Jesse, 256 



Hoyt, Joseph, 288 
Hubbard, K. IP, Jr., 221 
Hubbard, Elijah, 221 
Hubbard, G. A., 245 
Hubbard, G. W., 233 
Hubbard, Philip, 245 
Hubbart, J. R., 240 
Hubbart, John, 240 
Hubbcll, Comfort, 274, 275 
Hubbell, P. A, 274 
Hubbcll, John, 221 
Hney, W. B., 233 
Huff, PI. C, 295' 
Hughes, C. W„ 269 
Hughes, John, 295 
Hughes, Richard, 269 
Hughs, John, 236 
Unlet, Charles, 223 
Hull, George, 302 
Hull, PL P., 302 
//////, Samuel, 302 
//;///, Solomon, 288 
Humphreys, Lewis, 243 
Hunt, C. C, 302 
Hunt, J. IP, 2S8 
Hunt, Thcophilus, 302 
Hunt, Thomas, 266 
Hunter, F. PP, 240 
Hunter, S. A., 295 
Pluntington, A. B., 221 
Huntington, Andrew, 249 
Huntington, Thomas, 223 
Hurd, Harold, 275 
Ilurd, John, 280 
PPird, Russell, 280 
1 [utchins, G. P., 299 
Hutc/iins, Gordon, 299 
Hutchinson, Israel, 256 
Hyde, Thomas, 270 
Hylton, P. D., 215 
H}'pes, P. R., 240 

Ilgenfritz, Frederick, 289 
Ilgcnfritz, 0. P., 288 
Ingalls, J. P., 257 
Ingalls, Jacob, 257 
Ingersoll, 'Thomas, 281 
Iredell, A. E., 280 
Ireland, Joseph, 280, 281, 284 
Irvine, Samuel, 240 
Irwin, 'P. P., 280 

Jack, John, 226 
Jack, Matthew, 241 
Jaekman, . Ibel, 221 
Pickman, 1. M., 221 
Jackson, G. I!., 280 
Jackson, (riles, 285 
Jackson, James, 2S0 



INDJvX ()!• Ni;\V MEMBRKS AN!) ANClvSTOUS 



317 



Jackson, Samuel, 214, 21S 
Jacobs, Ebcncccr, Jr., 252 
Jacobs, J. T., 215 
Jacobs, Nathaniel, 215 
James, V. W., 280 
Farvis, E. S., 280 
Jarvis, P. B., 280 
Jaquith, Benjamin, 255 
Jaync, Isaac, 288 
Jenkins, C. T., 249 
Jenkins, F. M'., 281 
Jenkins, H. E., 300 
Jenkins, Lemuel, 300 
Jennings, B. E., 291 
Jennings, Joseph, 291 
Jennings, W. A., 291 
Jennings, Williston, 245 
Jerauld, Dutee, 25J 
Jeter, Littleton, 213 
Jezvett, Caleb, 238 
Jezvett, Llam, 292 
Jewett, J. L., 300 
Jezvett, Thomas, 300 
John, John, 235 
Johns, W. EX, 303 
Johnson, A. E., 268 ' 
Johnson, Hezekiah, 281 
Johnson, J. G., 227 
Johnson, Jacob, 272 
Johnson, Jeremiah, 227, 305 
Johnson, L. W., 281 
Johnson, P. I [.,■ 230 
Johnson, Rufiis, 264 
Johnson, S. C, 227 
Johnson, T. S., 242 
Johnson, Thomas, 300 
Johnson, Windsor, 292 
Johnston, James, 215 
Jones, A. P., 249 
Jones, Anthony, 245 
Jones, C. C, 215 
Jones, C. N., 227 
Jones, E. G., 249 
Jones, E. L., 245 
Jones, Peter, 2\6 
Jones, R. B., 249 
Jones, Simeon, 2T5 
Jones, W. W., 221 
Jordan, J. G., 293 
Judd, Orange, 226 
Judson, C. F., 221 
Jnen, H. A., 229 

Kachlein, J. P., 236 
Ka nter, C. A., 265 
Kanter; C. E., 265 
Karsner, C. W., 295 
Kasson, James, 240 
Kasson, L. B. J., 240 



Kcency, Thomas, 276 
Keepers, C. E., 215 
Keepers, William, 215 
Kellogg, Eliphalet, 215 
Kellogg, J. II., 215 
Kelly, R. S., 295 
Kelly, Samuel, 295 
Kelso, Alexander, 265 
Kelso, C. E., 265 
Kennedy, A. II., 26S 
Kenower, W. W., 237 
Kent, Dan, 241 
Kent, M. A., 301 
Keyes, Jo Jin, 286 
Keyes, V. E., 21s 
Kidd, E. L., 242 
Kidd, P. C, 269 
Kidder, Isaac, 252 
Kilbourne, Ashbel, 242 
Kimball, PI. W., 237 
Kimball, Jonathan, 237 
Kimball, Reuben, 268 
King, Daniel, 220 
King, Robert, 296 
King, Zachariah, 256 
Kingsbury, A. L., 258 
Kingsbury, Iiphraim, 258 
Kinue, Asa, 265 
Kinsley, John, 2S3 
Kirbv, W. W., 215 
Kirk, C. P., 295 
Kiltredgc, If. P., 258 
Kline, George, 289 
Kling, C. E, 281 
Kling, Henry, 281 
Knapp, L. IP, 292 
Knoll, Samuel, 292 
Knott, David, 273 
Knozvles, Simon, 215 
Knowlcs, VV. S., 215 
Knox, W. J., 295 
Koch, Johannes, 232, 264 
Kolkcr, Anthony, 22S 
Kr eider, Conrad, 280, 285 
Kreider, G. N., 233 
Kreidcr, Michael, 233 

Pad in, IP N„ 304 
Laflin, Mathezu, 254, 2^5 
Pakin, C. A., 2S1 
Lakin, William, 281 
Lamb, G. E., 281 
Panders, M. D., 237 
Landon, J. alum, 227 
Pandon. Newton, 227 
Lane, Alexander, 2_|0 
Lane, G. E„ 258 
Lane, John, 258 
Lane, W. A., 2|0 



3i8 



SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Lanphicr, Oliver, Jr., 218 
Larrabee, John, 290 
Lasher, C. De V., 237 
Lathrop, John, 256 
Latimer, Jonathan, 260 
La Tour, A. E., 281 
La Tour, A. IV., 2S1 
Lfl/f, Jonathan, 282 
Lawrence, Joseph, 255 
Lay, Simeon, 248 
Lazell, H. B., 265 
Z>£, Daniel, 218 
Ltftf, /?. LT., 242 
L?£, Samuel, 220 
Lefevre, George, 295 
Leftzvich, Augustus, Jr., 269 
Leidy, J. J., 272 
Leidy, Jacob, 272 
Lei per, James, 214 
Leland, G. L, 25S 
Leonard, Jonas, 267 
Leonard, Nathaniel, 262 
Leonard, Nathaniel, Jr., 262 
Leonard, Philip, 230 
L<? Sourd, John, 236 
Levering, Aaron, 249 
Levering-, R. M.,249 
Lewis, Eli, 255, 
Lewis, Jchabod, 216 
T^ewis, J. I 1 ., 231 
J*C7vis, Martin, y v>S 
TJbby, Josiah, 244 
L////r, David, 266 
J^indsey, David, 241 
Lindsey, Malcolm, 215 
Lindslcy, Aaron, .!<>2 
IJndsley, Elcaacr, 282, 283 
Lindslcy, G. L., 292 
Lindsly, Joseph, 233 
Lines, Erastus, 222 
Lines, Major, 219, 28 1 
Lines, T. T., 281 
Linscot, Samuel, 241 
Linscott, G. S., 241 
JJnscott, Samuel, 239 
IJnslcy, Eleacer, 283 
Lippincott, J. D., 272 
Lipscomb, R. C, 227 
JJpscomb, William, 227 
Littell, C. E., 216 
Littell, Jsaac, 2t6 
JJttle, Jsaac, 216 
L////V, Timothy, 2r3 
Littlcjohn, P. D., 221 
Livingston, James, 234 
Lloyd, A. W., 295 
Lobdell, Jsaac, 245 
Lockvvood, A. N., 272 
Lockwood, Buckingham, 221 



Lockwood, Lliphalet, 221, 222 
Lockwood, M. De P., 221 
Lockwood, M. De P., Jr., 222 
Lombard, Solomon, 243 
Long, G. F., 233 
J^ong, Moses, 233 
Longley, Alfred, 240 
J^ongley, Edmund, 240 
Loo mis, Israel, 215 
Loomis, Noah, 254, 255 
Loose, J. P., 295 
Lord, Benjamin, 253 
Lord, Calvin, 258 
Lord, James, 244 
Lord, Joseph, 258 
£ord, P// ////>, 253 
I^ord, Tobias, 245, 295 
Lothrop, Ebcnczer, 266 
Lcu'd, William, 283 
Lounsbcry, Raymond, 281 
Lounsbery, Stephen, 2S1 
Lounsbury, C. PL, 222 
I-tOunsbury, Linus, 222 
Louiv, Jonathan, 282 
Lovejoy, C. F., 258 
Love joy, G. A., 303 
I^ovejoy, Samuel, 258 
Lovcll, Caleb, 213 
Lovell, Samuel, 280 
Lovcrid'j.c, William, 227 
Low, D. L., 258 
Low, John, 258 
Lowell, L. D., 233 
Lowell, Moses, 233 
Lowman, K. M., 28T 
Lo wilier, E. A., 281 
Lowlher, William, 281 
Ludington, Henry, 235 
Lupfer, A. M., 303 
Jjipfcr, Casper, 281, 303 
Lupfer, E. P., 281 
Lute, Caster, 249 
Lux, Darby, 248 
Lvell, J. M., 240 
Lynch, C. P., 289 
Lynde, Jonathan, 233 
Lyon, G. A., 240 
J<yon, JoJui, 261 
Lyon, W. PL, 222 
Lyon, W. R., 274 

McP.ride, C. P., 289 
McCamant, "Bruce, 292 
McCamant, James, 202 
McCandlcss, Jesse, 242 
McCain! less, John, 2\2 
McCandlish, U. B., 227 
McClintock, R. O., 303 
McCHntock, S. S., 303 



INI)I-;X 01' NlvVV jMJ-M IH-KS and ancestors 



3 ' 9 



McClintock, William, 303 
McCracken, Philip, 302 
McCulloch, H. M. ( 2S1 
McCullough, C. T., 295 
McCullough, J. S., 296 
McCullough, Max, 227 
McDonald, Ail gus, 230 
McDonald, E. B., 240 
McDonald, James, 249 
McDonald, Richard, jy ] 
McDoivell, John, 237 
McDowell, Samuel, 216 
McElhannon, A. M., 299 
McElhannon, John, 299 
McFarlcmd, Andrew, 268 
McFarland, Daniel, 232 
McGaffey, A. B., 275 
McGaffey, John, 275 
McGaffey, L. K., 275 
McGaffey, Neil, 275 
McGee, R. P., 216 
McGill, J. D., 273 
McGuire, Hugh, 286 
McHenry, James, 292 
McKcan, Thomas, 2S0 
McKee,. G. H., 303 
McKee, John, 303 
McKee, 'J' ho mas, 280 
McKee, William, 238 
McKenna, C. A., 292 
McKenzie, A. H., 258 
McKinney, C. H., 282 
Mc Kinney, Joseph, 236 
McKinney, \V. IX, 289 
McKown, Patrick, 246 
M chain, Robert, 288, 291 
McLouth, Pater, 265 
McLouth-, S. C, 265 
McMitcliell, James, 265 
MacNutt, F. A., 237 
MacNutt, S. P., 237 
Madison, G. W., 298 
Ma gee, James, 237 
Magruder, W. E., 249 
Magruder, Zadock, 249 
Major, John, 269 
Mallory, Abner, 221 
Mann, Andrew, 235 
Mann, B. IT., 222 
Mansfield, Richard, 260 
Manion, Daniel, 265 
Manton, W. P., 265 
Mardcn, C. S., 268 
Marden, Edward, 268 
Mariner, II. B., 230 v 
Mariner, John, 230 
Marsh, Buckingham, 222 
Marsh. Daniel, 252 
Marsh, Bsckicl, 302 



Marsh, Bsckicl, Jr., 302 
Marshall, C. C, 289' 
Marshall, John, 294 
Marshall, W. R., 216 
Marston, F. W., 212 
Marston, S. I., 212 
Marston, Samuel, 212, 243 
Martin,. E. E. P., 227 
Martin, p. M., 299 
Martin, James, 295 
Martin, James, 235 
Martin, Joseph, 216 
Martin, K. H., 282 
Martin, N. F., 212 
Martin, R. W., Jr., 304 
Martin, S. F., 216 
Marvin, Matthew, 281 
Muscall, Stephen, 230 
Mason, Ebencser, 227 
Mason, Blisha, 219 
Mason, George, 299 
Mason, H. D., 282 
Mason, Hcrvey, Jr., 258 
Mason, Hcsck'mh, 282 
Mason, N. E., 227 
Mason, W. E., 259 
Mather, Moses, 270 
Mather, Moves, 270 
Mathes, R. W, 2^9 
Mathias, A. C, 216 
Matson, O. A., 275 
Matthews, A. S., 282 . 
Matthews, C. B., 282 
Maul, Johaunis, 282 
Mayes, Samuel. 225 
Maynard, A. F., 265 
Maynard, Gardner, 26s 
Mead, H. \V., 303 
Mead, Moses, 303 
Means, J. H., 259 
Mcars, John. 303 
Mears, W. A., 303 
Meek, Isaac, 289 
Meek, J. W., 289 
Meeker, Caleb, 273 
Meeker, Joseph. 273 
Meeker, Timothy, 273 
Merrick, J. L., 24s 
Merrill, C. \\\, 237 
Merrill, L. C, 270 
Merrill, T,. S., 245 
Merrill, Samuel, 303 
Merrill, Samuel, 237, 303 
Merrill, Stephen. 245 - 
Merrill, T. A., 240 
Merriman, B. P., 222 
Merrimau. Charles, 222 
Meyers, C. A., 205 
Middlcton, Hod v, 2(1 



\20 



SONS 01' TIIU AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Miles, G. F., 212 
.Miller, E. D., 282 
Miller, E. L., 266 
Miller, F. D., 249 
Miller, F. H., 282 
Miller, F. Z., 249 
Miller, Frederick, 27S 
Miller, H. J., 273 
Miller, Jesse, 242 
Miller, Joseph, 273 
Miller, R. O., 249 
Miller, Samuel, 226 
Milliken, F. P., 245 
Mj7/j, John, 303 
M*7/^ P<?ter, 27S 
Mills, Roger, 27S 
Millspangh, Abraham, 282 
Millspaugh, G. M„ 282 
Mi not, James, 271 
Mitchell, Moses, Jr., 245 
Mitchell, Moses, Sr., 245 
Moffett, D. L. V., 259 
Moffett, John, 2^9 
Mohler, F. L., 249 
Mohr, H. C, 230 
Montell, G. A., 212 
Montgomery, John, 217 
Moore, J. S., 303 
Morgan, Charles, 236 
Morgan, D. T., 2S2 
Morgan, E. J., 222 
Morgan, G. E., 250 
Morrell, G. C, 259 
Morrill, Oliver, 262 
Morris, C. G., 222 
Morris, Daniel, Jr., 222 
Morrison, D. A., 282 
Morrison, G. H., 282 
Morrison, Moses, 245 
Morrison, S. C, 245 
Morton, John, 294 
Moses, Aaron, 269 
Moses, Darius, 269 
Moses, George, 241 
Moses, H. N., 241 
Moses, R. TT., 282 
Mosicr, B. J., 2(58 
M osier, Joseph, 268 
Moss, Isaac, 294 
Motley, F. A., 245 
Moid, Johannes, Jr., 282 
Moulder, William, 228 
Moule, Christoffel, 282 
Monlton, E. S., 222 
Moulton, Noyes, 303 
Moulton, Samuel, 303 
M 07 cry. Christian, 294 
Mnirhead, D. A., 237 
Mulford, Ulisha, Jr., 285 



Mul ford, Blisha, Sr., 285 
Mulford, Bsekiel, 283 
Mnl ford, Uri, 283 
Mulkey, J. L. C, 266 
Mulkcy, Phillip, 266- 
Mumford, IV. C, 231 
M unger, It lias, 230 
Muuger, Jehiel, 269 
Mann, Reuben, 290 
Mu n roe, F. M., 283 
Munro<e, 1 Villi a in, 3d, 283 
Murdoch, Daniel, 273 
Mnrdock, G. J., 273 
Murray, C. S., 259 
Murray, E. O., 250 
Murray, H. W., 259 
Murray, J. W., 259 
Murray, John, 247, 250 
Myer, H. W., 296 
Myer, J. IT., 230 
Myers, John, 269 
Myers, L. E., 289 

Nash, Caleb, 223 
Nash, Moses, Jr., 270 
Ncagle, Philip, 289 
Neal, W. K., 268 
Neill, W. W., 273 
Nelson, David, 234 
Nelson, George, 226 
Nettleton, D. L., 222 
Ncwhall, Bsra, 254 
Newhall, William, 262 
Newton, David, 268 
Newton, Marshall, 262, 263 
Newton, Sctli, 267 
Nichols, David, 265 
Nichols, J. G, 293 
Nichols, J obex, 214 
Nichols, Lemuel, 220 
Nicholson, S. L., 296 
Nickerson, Covel, 270 
Nickerson, E. S., 270 
Nickerson, Bdzvard, 270 
Niius, Ariel, 216 
Nims, F. A., 216 
Noble, Bsekiel, 254 
Noble, H. P., 283 
Noble, Patrick, 213 
Noe, Louis, 267 
Nones, Benjamin, 278 
Norcross, J. A., 222 
N orris, James, 228 
North, George, 206 
North, R. T>., 296 
Northrop, C. S., 233 
Northrup, Nicholas, 241 
Norton, J). < >., 216 
Norton, Oliver, 216 



fNDEX 01' NEW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS 



321 



Noursc, C. L., 240 
No yes, Joseph, 217 
Nugent, F. R., 230 
Nutter, Grafton, 258 
Nye, Benjamin., 233 
Nye, H. G., 233 

Odell, Amos, 286 
Ogden, Daniel, 296 
Ogden, G. W., 304 
Ogden, H. M., 304 
Ogden, Jcdcdiah, 236 
Ogden, Z. B., 296 
Oliver, Alexander, 289 
Olney, Stephen, 29S 
Osborn, G. T., 259 
Osborn, J. II., 259 
Osborne, E. A., 273 
Osgood, S. W., 234 
Osgood, Samuel, 234 
Ostrander, Adam, 215 
Ott, J. L., 237 
Ottman, Christian, 278 
Oviatt, Ebeneccr, 283 
Oviatt, Lorenzo, 283 
Owen, Ebenezcr, 261 
Owen, F. B., 250 
Ozmun, C. T., 26S 

Packard, Reuben, 270 
Page, Cecil, 234 
Page, Samuel, 294 
J 'nine, Print on, 273 
Paine, Edward, 234 
Paine, F. G., 246 
Paine, G. C., 273 
Paine, T. H., 216 
Paine, J. B., 234 
Paine, Noah, 216 
Paine, William, 246 
rainier, C. S., 222 
Palmer, C. T., 234 
Palmer, Ichabod, 276, 287 
Palmer, Jcdidiah, 287 
Palmer, Smith, 220 
Palmer, Thomas, 234 
Parcc, E. P., 297 
Parish, Luke, 301 
Park, S. C, 299 
Park, William, 2.41 
Parke, F. N. t 250 
Parke, Joseph, 250 
Parke, R. A., 2 so 
Parker, C. FT., 29 1 
Parker, Elisha, 238 
Parker, F. T., 211 
Parker, John, 261, 299 
Parker, Joseph, Jr., 29T 
Parker, Joseph, Sr., 291 

21 



Parker, Troost, 211 
Park-hurst, C. E., 259 
Parkhurst, Ebenezcr, 259 
P'ar melee, Oliver, 255 
Parshall, H. E., 266 - 
Parshall, Israel, 276 
Parshall, Jonathan, 264, 26C 
Parsons, R. L., 273 
Patten, David, 270 
Patten, John, 270 
Patterson, J. II., 240 
Patterson, James, 2d, 231 
Patterson, W. B., 216 
Patton, G. R., 289 
Patton, Geo rge,. 289 
Pax ton, John, 282 
Payne, William, 246 
Pear, C. M., 259 
Pcarce, Cromivell, 294 
Pearson, A. E., 259 
Pearson, W. E., 259 
Pearson, W. PI., 2(5o 
Pease, Calvin, 223, 301 
Pease, David, 235 
Pease, F. H., 301 
Pease, S. G., 223 
Pechin, H. PL, 227 
Peck, A. S., 228 
Peck, G. PL, 223 
Peer, C. H., 223 
Per Pee, Edmond, 288 
Perry, j. C., 246 
Perry, John, 246 
Perry, Thomas, 2^0 
Perry, W. W., 223 
Perry, William, 250 
Pettigrczu, Joint, 295 
Phelps, Amos, 279 
Phelps, Eli, 220 
Phelps, P rast its, 279 
Phelps, Jonathan, 254 
Phelps, Noah, 222 
Phelps, Samuel, 260 
Philips, David, 216, 296 
Philips, W. A., 216 
Phillips, A. W., 223 
Phillips, David, 296 
Phillips, G. R., 296 
Phillips, Thomas, 296 
Phillips, William, 223 
Pickens, Andrew, 213 
Pierce, Benjamin, 2S3 
Pierce, Byron, 283 
Pierce, Delano, 302 
Piera', flccckiah, 214 
Pierce, Shadrach, Jr., 251 
Pillsbury, Cah b, 260 
Pillsbury, G. P... 260 
Pillsbury, W. IF. C, 260 



3 i>: 



SONS 01' TLLJ- AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Pinkham, A. W., 260 

Pink ham, Daniel, 260 
Piper, R. D., 240 
Place, John, 220 
Place, Phillip, 298 
Piatt, F. C, 283 
Piatt, Zephaniali, 277, 284 
Plimpton, Daniel, 253 
Polk, Bphraim, 240 
Polk, PL PL, 240 
Pomeroy, PI. B., 260 
Pomeroy, W. H., 260 
Pool, Thomas, 301 
Porter, I. W., 270 
Porter, Joseph, 270 
Porter, T. R., 270 
Post, Joseph, 265 
Potter, D. P., 283 
Potter, David, 293 
Potter, Gilbert, 286 
Potter, PL D., 242 
Potter, James, 291 
Potter, Lake. 242 
J J otter, William, 299 
J'ratt, Bphriam, 303 
Pratt, II. PL, 283 ' 
Pratt, L. R., 303 
Pratt, William, 276 
Prescott, John, 283 
Prescott, Jonathan, 240, 283 
Prescott, S. I., 283 
Price, W. B., 216 
Prime, B. Y ., 283 
J^rime, Bbenezer, 283 
Prime, Gilbert, 283 
J'rince, Kimball, 238 
Proctor, Oliver, 228 
Proctor, W. H., 228 
Pryor, Emory, 2^2 
Puffer, II. C, 260 
Pugh, Joseph, 242 
Pugsley, C. De W., 283 
Ihtgslcy, Samuel, 284 
Pullen, J. PL, 242 
Purviance, James, 237 
Putnam, Amos, 268 
Putnam, Jsrael, 22T 
Putnam, Reuben, 271 

Quiver, John, 263 

Raddin, D. B., 260 
Raddin, J. A., 260 
Ramsay, William, 248 
Ramsey, Alexander, jjS> 
Ramsey, William, 291 
Randall, Nathaniel. 259 
Randlctt, F. 11., 260 
Ranncy, F. T., 266 



Ransom, BUas, 278 
Ray, J. B., 293 
Raymond, Enoch, 272 
Rea, E. C, 260 
Rea, Ebenezcr, 260 
Read, O. J., Si\, 234 
Redden, B. B., 260 
Reed, Lemuel, 301 
7?rcd, Paif/, 268 
Reed, VV. S., 29S 
Remsen, Abraham, 277 
Reynolds, Gardner, 298 
Reynolds, Nathaniel, 225 
Rich, W. C, 225 
Richards, W. P., 234 
Richardson, Asa, 261 
Richardson, Edward, 261 
Richardson, G. E., 261 
Richardson, Jeduthuu, 254 
Richardson, Jonathan, 252 
Richardson, Moses, 252 
Richardson, William, 247 
Ridgeivay, James, 274 
Ridley, Daniel, 243 
Riggs, A. R., 250^ 
Riggs, J. B., 250 
Riggs, Lawrason, 250 
Riggs, Samuel, 248, 250 
Rightcr, Michael, 299 
Riner, W. A., 305 
Riter, L. C., 299 
Robbe, Alexander, 260 ' 
Robbins, E. P., 261 
Robbins, T. IT., 250 
Roberts, F. B., 293 
Roberts, William, 293 
Robinson, C. F., 271 
Robinson, J^cvi, 243 
Robinson, R. B., 211 
Robinson, Randall, 211 
Rockefeller, Diel, 284 
Rockefeller, Philip, 284 
Rockefeller, Roydon, 284 
Rodcrfield, J. W. 11., 304 
Rodgers, E. P., 251 
Rodgers, II. W., 251 
Rogers, Alexander, 230 
Rogers, C. P., 284 
Rogers, F. B., 2S4 
Rogers, G. L., 261 
Rogers, II. F., 284 
Rogers, J. C., 261 
Rogers, Silas, 261 
Rogers, William, 279, 284 
Rollins, Aaron, 270 
Rollins, J. C, 275 
Roll ins, John, 275 
Root, Ebenezcr, 268 
Root, F. \Y., 268 



1N1)]-;X Ul' NICW MIvMBl'.KS AND ANCESTORS 



323 



Root, G. L., 234 

Root, Gideon, 234 

Rose, Jonathan, 251 

Rose, M. I., 251 

Ross, Edmund, 275 

Ross, James, 275 

Ross, Pitt, 275 

Roth, Christian, 288 

Rowe, G. S., 223 

Roive, Joseph, 258 

Ruddock, John, 263 

RuggJes, Edzvard, 226 

Ruggles, (Robert) Bostzvick, 218 

Rumney, Edzvard, 259 

Rumsey, S. L., 216 

Ritsco, David, 286 

Rusco, Nathaniel, 279, 280 

Rush, G. P., 292 

Russell, PT. C, 223 

Russell, Jason, 271 

Russell, John, 258 

Russell, Stephen, 2s6 

Russell, W. IT., 216 

Rust, A. C, 284 

Rust, Levi, 284 

Rut ledge, John, 211 

Ryan, S. B., 213 

SafFord, Joseph, 292 
Sammis, E. W., 284 
Sam mis, Everest, 284 
Sammis, T. IP, 284 
Sampson, Deborah, 254 
Sampson, James, 246 
Sampson, M. IP, 246 
Sanders, Benjamin, Jr., 212 
Sanders, Benjamin, Sr., 212 
Sanderson, Amasiah, 218 
Sanford, Elisha, 222 
Sanford, J. O, 298 
Sanford, J air us, 266 
Sanford, Strong, 219 
Sanor, D. G., 289 
Sanor, Michael, 289 
Sargent, Christopher, 239 
Sargent, G. P. T., 237 ' 
Sargent, J. F. T., 237 
Sar gen t, Robert, 239 
Sargent, Winthrop, 25S 
Savage, Elisha, 222 
Savage, Joel, 297 
Sawyer, H. T., 296 
Sawyer, Lazvrence, 228 
Sawyer, Nathaniel, 296 
Savrc, C. PT., 241 
Schaeffer, G. C, 289 
Schenck, John, 219, 268 
Scherck, IP I., 269 
Schley, Steiner, 251 



Schouten, C. P., 268 
Schuyler, Jd arm anus, 217 
Schuyler, J J hilip, 229 
Schuyler, W. F., 217 
Scofield, R. W., 241 
Scott, Ezekiel, 304 
Scott, H. G., 296 
Scott, Phineas, 283 
Scott, Thomas, 296 
Scott, William, Jr., 238 
Scott, William, Sr., 238 
Scovell, R. J., 238 
Scovell, Thomas, 238 
Scribner, Thadeus, 223 
Scudder, Henry, 285 
Scudder, Townsend, 284 
Scudder, William, 220 
Seager, C. W., 261 
S eager, Elijah, 261 
Scars, B. M., 223 
Scars, David, 223 
Seaver, IT. j\T., 261 
Sedam, Ryke, 272 
Sedgwick, Samuel, 279 
Seeley, PT. J., 223 
Sec ley, Sctli, 220 
Seger, Elijah, 261 
Semans, PI. M., 289 
Seuter, Joseph, 289 
Sever, William, 262 
Seymour, Jonathan, 222 
Seynor, Michael, 289 
Shannon, C. N., 2T7 
Shannon, W. W., 289 
Shattnck, Job, 244, 245, 246, 287 
Shaw, C. S., 261 
Shazv, Daniel, 305 
Shearer, C. IP, 228 
Shearer, Christopher, 228 
Shee, Bcrtles, 233 
Sheehy, Daniel, 288, 291 
Shelby, Evan, 304 
Shepard, Daniel, 220 
Shcpard, O. M., 223 
Shepard, Thomas, 223 
Shepherd, B. P., 293 
Shepherd, Elisha, 232 
Sheppard, F. IT., 229 
Shcrer, A. I,, 285 
Shcrer, 1). P., 285 
Shcrer, David, 285 
Slier er, Joseph, 274 
Shcrer, Samuel, 274 
Sherman, Roger, 504 
Rhirlev, A IT., j(u 
Shirtliff. Robert, 254 
Shoemaker, Charles, 230 
Shoppc, Anthony, 243 
Sh river, David, '2s 1 



324 



SONS OV Till-) AMKKICAN REVOLUTION 



Shrivcr, E. W., 251 
Siebeneck, H. K., 296 
Silkworth, William, 276 
Simpson, Benjamin, 244, 246 
Simpson, David, 243 
Simpson, K. C, 223 
Simpson, E. L., 240 
Simpson, H. J., 289 
Simms, N. C, 285 
Simms, Robert, 211 
Singletary, Thankful, 227 
Skinner, Abraham, 288 
Skinner, F. S., 273 
Skinner, Richard, 27$ 
Skinner, Stephen, 221 
Slater, Benjamin, 297 
Shtuson, Israel, 265 
Slovens, Isaiah, 228 
Slavens, T. H., 228 
Sleeper, David, 253, 271 
Sleeper, Peter, 271 
Sloo, Thomas, 242 
Smelser, G. W., 303 
Smith, A, H., 261 
Smith, A. V., 234 
Smith, Christopher, 262 
Smith, E. W., 224 
Smith, Elihu, 303 
Smith, Elisha, 297 
Smith, Epenetus, 279, 287 
Smith, Epcnctns, Sr., 277 
Smith, Ezekial, 251 
Smith, F. C, 230 
Smith, F. D., 224 
Smith, F. E., Jr., 298 
Smith, IT. W., 290 
Smith, Jacob, 224 
Smith, John, 262 
Smith, Josepli, 277 
Smith, Junia (Juui), 297 
Smith, L. F., 251 
Smith, M. A., 290 
Smith, Preserved, Sr., 29S 
Smith, R. M., 262 
Smith, Reuben, 269 
Smith, S. V., 213 
Smith, Samuel, 286 
Smith, Stephen, 263 
Smith, Thomas, 251 
Smith, W. P., 266 
Smith, Ward, 276 
Smith, William, 242 
Smock, John, 232 
Snyder, H. S., 241 
Snyder, S. ()., 269 
Sol lev, Thomas, 222 
Somervell, W. IF, 228 
Sornbcrgcr, E. C, 285 
Southivick, George, 268 



Spalding, F. S., 29x9 
Spalding, Jesse, 299 
Spalding, John, 299 
Sparks,; B. L., 238 
Spaulding, Sampson, 229 
Sped, A. R., 228 
Speer, J. T., 217 
Spencer, Amos, 293 
Spencer, Joel, 293 
choicer, Stephen. 222 
Spencer, Timothy. 267 
Sperry, E. R., 290 
Sperry, L. G., 269 
Sperry, Peter, 290 
Spenlda, A. II., 234 
Spinney, B. F., 262 
Spinney, F. C, 262 
Spragne, G. E., 262 
Sprague, H. B., 262 
Spragne, Philip, 222 
Sprat ley, Richard, 279 
Stafford, Daniel, 265 
Stafford, F. O., 266" 
Stagg, J. H., 224 
Stagg, John, Jr., 242 
Stah I, Henry, 292 
Stahl, S. S. A. D., 292 
Staley, J. C., 269 
Staley, J. C., Jr., 269 
Stall, Jacob, 297 
Stanton, John. 291 
Stanzvood, Winthrop, 230 
Staples, A. II., 211 
Stark, John, 29 t 
Starr, W. W., 224 
Stavncr, B. L., 231 
St. Clair, F. A., 228 
St, Clair, James, 228 
St. Clair, Thomas, 228 
Stearns, W. N., 290 
Steele, Andrew, 270 
Steiner, John, 251 
Sterling, Frederic IT., Jr., 238 
Stevens, A. E., 266 
Stevens, C. II., 224 
Stevens, P.lisha, 224 
Stevens, G. H., 262 
Stevens, J. F. C, 262 
St-evens, Joel, 262 
Stevens, John, 262 
Stevens, Joseph, 266 
Stevens, Joshua, 243 
Stevenson, C. N., 238 
Stevenson, PI. G., 2T3 
Stevenson, J. M., 262 
Stevenson, L. T., 263 
Stevenson, W. NT., 296 
Stewart, Andrew, 205 
Stewart, J. L S.. 230 



1NH1CX 01'' NKW MlvMUJCRS AND ANCl-S'i'OKS 



325 



Stewart, S. A., 238 
Sticliter, G. B., 296 
Stickler, Peter, 296 
Stickney, Abraham, Jr., 252 
Stickney, B. C, 273 
Stickney, Blcaser, 233 
Stickney, Jeremiah, 234 
Stickney, Jonathan, 273 
vStiles, E. vS., 251 
Stone, Benjamin, 270 
Stone, G. M., 246 
Stone, George, 270 
Stone, J. T., 251 
Stone, N. H., 237 
Stone, Newell, 251 
Storrs, Dan, 217 
Storrs, O. S., 217 
Story, Elisha, 263 
Story, H. P., 217 
Story, J. R., 263 
Story, John, 258 
Stough, G. A., 217 
Stough, Jacob, 217 
Stover, I. II., 304 
Strang, F. L., 217 
Strang, S. B., 217 
Strange, W. R., 242 
Stroud, Jacob, 296 
Stuart, Daniel, 26 1 
Stuart, William, 216 
Stubblefield, D. A., 231 
St ud ley, Benjamin, 237 
Stall, Jacob, 297 
Sttirtevant, C. K., 303 
Sturtevant, Consider, 303 
Sturtevant, Joseph, 246 
Sturtevant, W. EL, 246 
Suits, John, 232 
Sunnier, Clement, 261 
Sutliffe, John, 223 
Sutton, Peter, 297 
Sutton, Richard, 253 
Swan, P. K., 213 
Swan, Robert, 213 
Swear in gen, Van, 274 
Swift, J. H., 266 

Tanner, Thomas, Jr., 299 
Taplin, Elisha, 267 
Tarhel, C. A., 217 
Tarbel, W. E., 217 
Tarbell, R. C, 290 
Turbcll, William, 290 
Tate, W. M., 224 
Taylor, C. II., 234 
Taylor, Charles, 249 
Taylor, David, 217 
Taylor, II. II., 234 
Taylor, J. II., 25 1 



Taylor, L. M., 217 
Taylor, Samuel, 234 
Taylor, Thomas, 251 
Tebbets, T. C, 263 
J' eel, Ger shorn, 259 
Teerpening, Uendricus, 276 
Teller, Frederick, 234 
Teller, James, 234 
Ten Broeck, Adam, 285 
Ten Brook, John, 235 
Terhune, T. M., 285 
Ter Kuile, E. M, 281 
Terr ill, Edmund, 215 
Thaxter, Joseph, 221 
Thomas, Benjamin, 251 
Thomas, G. II., 275 
Thomas, Israel, 256 
Thomas, J. B., 251 
Thompson, D. L., 271 
Thompson, David, 221 
Thompson, ] 1. W., 293 
Thompson, Jedulhan, 224 
Thompson , Moses. 271 
Thompson, P. S., 224 
Thompson, W. S., 266 
Thompson, Walter, 266 
Thomson, John, 271 
Thorla, Abram, 246 
Thurlow, Abram, 246 
Thurlow, E. H., 246 
Thwing, E. W., 230 
Thwing, John, 230 
Thwing, Niclwlas, 230 
Tilden, Daniel, 290 
Tilden, Guy, 290 
Tillinghast, Charles, 298 
Tillinghast, II. S., 298 
Tilton, C. O., 285 
Tilt on, Nehcmiah, 229 
Tilton, Uriah, 285 
Tippetts, W. II., 229 
'Titus, Joseph, 221 
Titus, R. L., 2S5 
Tobias, L. C, 293 
Todd, Thomas, 270 
Tomlinson, Agar, 224 
Tomlinson, Beach, 224 
Tomlinson, R. I)., 224 
To nlinson, W. I 7 ., 224 
Torbert, W. S., 228 
Torre nee, Joseph, 237 
Tourtellot, William, 297, 298 
Tozver, Peter, Jr., 253 
Tozvle, Brackctt, 2t -\ 
Towle, G. \Y., 213 
Tqwnsend, C. E., 285 
Townsend, V. J., 285 
Trabue, J. J.. 269 
Tracy, R. S., 304 



3^> 



SONS 01' TUL5 AMI-KKWN K lvV0f,UT ION 



Treadivell, Daniel, 220 
Tritt, Peter, 295 
Trunkey, H. D., 304 
Turbett, Thomas, 273 
Turk, Thomas, 248 
Turner, Daniel, 216 
Turner, Job, 253 
Turner, John, 253 
'Turner, William, 299 
Turpin, Horatio, 250 
T/r/Z/r, /</fcr.7, 217 
Tattle, Lucius, 219 
Tivitchell, Moses, 245, 246 
Tyler, Daniel, 221 

Upson, Samuel, 224 
Upson, W. H., 224 
Upton, E. C, 263 
Urauu, Thomas, 257 

To//, (7. 7'., 282 

Vaile, J. E„ 238 

/ 'alentine, ObaJiah, 30^ 

Vance, J. C:, 287 

/ r ance, William, .'^7 

Vanderveer, R. C, 290 

Tan Orcleu, Andrew, 230 

Van Pelt, E. R„ 273 

Van Schaick, A. P., 235 

Van Schaick, John, Jr., 228 

Van Vales, Peter, 213 

Vaughan, Joseph, 299 

Vcasey, Jonathan, 262 

Velsor, H. S„ 286 

Von Knappe, W. T., 237 

Wadleigh, Nathaniel, 271 
Wait, Asa, 266 
Waite, W. A., 266 
Wakefield, F. W., 224 
Watden, Elijah, 237 
} Vales, Bphraim, 263 
Wales, T. B., 263 
Wales, T. E., 213 
Wales, W. V., 213 
Wales, William, 213 
Walke, Anthony, 227 
Walker, Joshua, 2_'8 
Walker, Joshua, Jr., 226 
Walker, Joshua, Sr., 226 
Walker, Philip, 228 
JValker, Samuel, 256 
Walktip, Thomas, 286 
Walling, T. Ik, 2% 
Walton, A. N., 21.3 
Walworth, Benjamin, 286 
Walworth, '). 11., 2.86 
Ward, G. W., 251 
Ward, James, 251 



Warner, G. W., 217 
Warner, J. G., 263 
Warner, S. G., 263 

Warner, Stephen, 286 
Warner, T. B., 252 ■ 
Warns, S. M., 252 
Warren, Ashbel, 213 
Warren, David, 228 
Warren, Hera, 305 
Warren, Francis E., 305 
Warren, Frederick E., 305 
Warren, H. R., 213 
Warren, J. B., 263 
Warren, J cduthan, 263 
Warren, Jonathan, 217 
Warren, L. S., 228 
Warren, Nathan, 235 
Warren, P. L., 235 
Warriner, Noah, 289 
Washburn, Levi, 298 
Washburn, R. C, 298 
Washington, C. C, 218 
Water, Asa, 295 
Waterbury, John, 3///, 270 
Waterman, L. A., 298 
Waters, Asa, 273 
Waters, M. S., 273 
Watson, C. R., Jr., 238 
Watson, Cyprian, 238 •-' 
Watson, Robert, 2T2 ' 
Watson, Samuel, 212 ' 
Watson, Thomas, 297 v 
Watson, Titus, 288 • 
Watts, C. M., 305 
Weare, John, 235 
Weare, Peter, 2^5 
Weaver, G. O. B., 286 
Weaver, Joseph, 266 
Weaver, W. J., 266 
IP'cbb, George, 30; 
Webb, J. W., 301^ 
Webb, Jeremiah, 238 
Webb, Nathaniel, 278 
Webb, S. B., 301 
Webb, W. S., Jr., 301 
Webber, JJ' r il!iam, 297 
Webster, E. K., 271 
Webster, Tbenecer, 271 
JVcbstcr, Stephen, 274 
Weed an, Augustine, 229 
Weed on, T. A., 229 
Weeks, C. PL, 304 
}} 'eeks, Joshua, 304 
Welles, Martin, 224 
Welles, Roger, 22.1 
Wells, David, 298 
// 'ells, James, 295 
Wells, Joseph, 265 
Wells, Levi, 293 



INDEX 01' NlvW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS 



327 



Welton, Frank, 266 
Welton, Stephen, Jr., 266 
Welty, II. V. W., 304 
Welly, John, 304 
Wenner, George, 2(jj 
Wenner, H. L,., 290 
Wenner, J. C, 290 
Wenner, T. P., 297 
Wentworth, Caleb, 25S 
West, Ellas, 267 
West, G. M., 229 
IV est, Jo Ini, 229 
West, William, Jr., 229 
Westcott, F. J., 299 
Westerfield, E. II., 270 
Westfall, Abraham, 290 
Westfall, R. E., 290 
Wctmore, Bela, 229 
Wheeler, Caleb, 251 
Wheeler, Cornelius, 305 
Wheeler, Elisha, 251 
Wheeler, John, 239 
Wheeler, S. PL, 224 
Wheeler, Samuel, 269 
Wheeler, T. H„ 248 
Wheeler, Thomas, 227 
Whelan, J. C, 290 
I I n ickcar, J Villia m , 238 
Whicker, T. W., 238 
Whicker, William, 238 
Whipple, Benjamin, Jr., 268 
Whitcomb, A. M., 275 
Whitcomb, Robert, 275 
White, A. E., 211 
White, A. P., 225 
IV hit e, Abraham, 250 
While, Benjamin, 293 
White, C. A., 218 
White, Christopher, 211 
White, David, 286 
White, Ebenezer, 217 
J I Jiite, Ezra, 220 
White, Israel, 225 
White, John, 21S 
White, W. G., 286 
Whitford, R. N., 290 
Whiting, Henry, 267 
Whiting, Timothy, 267 
Whitney, IT. H, 286 
Whitney, Josiah, 286 
Wickham, E. AT., 290 
Wight, John, 262 
Wiley, Josiah, 215 
Wilhelm, C. M., 270 
Wilkinson, A. E., 299 
Wilkinson, R. Raymond, 290 
Wilkinson, R. Herbert r 290 
Willcox, Jo Jin, 2jj 
Willey, Ahimaaz, 305 



Williams, P>. M., 275 

Williams, Daniel, 235 

Williams, Daniel, 218 

Williams, G. V S., 286 

Williams, J. F. f 264 

Williams, John, 275 

Williams, L. AT., 286 

Williams, L. R., 242 

Williams, O. H., 296 

Williams, Silas, 264 

Williams, Wardner, 218 

Williamson, T. W., 252 

Willis, C. A. H., 286 

Willis, F. G., 218 

Willson, Nathaniel, 234 

Wilson, Arch-clans, 271 

Wilson, G. K., 225 

Wilson, G. W\, 238 

Wilson, Hugh, 291 

Wilson, James, 289 

Wilson, John, 235, 239 

Wilson, Nathaniel, 234 

Wilson, W. H., 241 

Winchcll, Elisha, Jr., 225 

Winchell, J. R., 225 

Winchester, William, 248 

Winder, I^evin, 248 

Wingate, A. R., 229 

Wingate, Joshua, 217 

JVilliington, Peter, 246 

Wood, Amos, 252 

Wood, Bezaleel, 291 

Wood, C. J., 214 

W r ood, D. R., 238 

Wood, D. S., 286 

Wood, E. E., 243 

Wood, J. F., 287 

Wood, Jeremiah, 283, 284, 286, 287 

Wood, Jeremiah, 2d, 287 

Wood, R. K., 2S2 

Wood, Thcophilus, 284 

Wood, W. II., 301 

Wood, W. W., Jr., 287 

Woodbury, W. L., 264 

JVoodman, Joseph, 263 

Woodruff, I.afayette, 291 

Woodruff, Timothy, 291 

Woods, C. A., 297 

Woods, J. A., 29 r 

Woods, Joseph, 290 

Woods, L. C., 297 

Woodward, Daniel, 301 

Woodzvard, William, 243 

Woodward, Y. A., 243 

Wooldridge, John, 2O2 

Woostcr, Nathan, 223 

Worcester, Noah, 264 

Worceslcr, W. II., 264 

Work, James, 245 



328 



SONS UL' THE AMERICAN INVOLUTION 



Wright, Bezalcel, 241 
Wright, David, 226 
Wright, FJisha, 22S 
Wriglit, G. N., 235 
Wright, George, 240 
Wright, R. A., 241 
Wright, T. J., 304 
Wyman, G. II., 301 
Wyman, Paul, 261 
Wynne, Thomas, 294 

Yale, Blihu, 264 

Yates, E. W., 211 



Yates, F. W., 287 
Yates, Peter, 281 
Yeomans, C. S., 225 
Youmans, L. E., 305 
Young, A. W., 235 
Young, D. B. ( 287 
Young, D. W. C, 297 
Young, J. G., Jr., 264 
Young, John, 213 
Younglove, II. B., 273 
Younglovc, John, 273 



General Index. 



Alabama Society, historical sketch, 

membership, 86 

officers, 27 
Aliens, Committee on, t5 

distribution of leaflet No. 2, 

203, 206 
report of Committee, 138 
Amendments, constitutional pro- 
vision for, 31, 36 
Ames, L, A., New York report, J5.4 
Ames, P. W., nomination of G. C. 

Sargent, 172 _ 
Annapolis, proceedings at, 164 

State House, 166 
Anthem, national, playing of, 202 
Antiquities, preservation of, 12S 
Arizona Society, historical sketch, 
92 
membership, 86 
officers, 37 
Arkansas Society, historical 
sketch, 92 
membership, 86 
officers, 27 
Armstrong, Augustus, Washing- 
ton report, 158 
Auditing Committee, 12 
report, 79 

Baker, II. M., nominated Vice- 
President General, 172 
Baltimore, banquet at, 177 
committees, 64 
members present at, 72 
proceedings at, 65 
social functions, 209 
Banner, report of Committee on 

award of, 89 
Banquet, 177 
Barry, John, location of statue 

of, 202 
Beardsley, Morris B., address at 
banquet, 197 
biography, 4 

elected President General, 171 
President General's address, 

Bibbins, Arthur B., on Annapolis 

State House, 166 
Biographies of officers, 4-10 
Breckenridge, R. W., Nebraska 

neport, 15a 



Bulletin, Official, distribution of, 

83. 203 
Burroughs, John II., biography, 9 
elected Treasurer General, 174 
By-Laws, 32 

California Society, delegates, 74 

historical sketch, 92 

membership, 86 

officers, 38 
Certificates of membership, 35 
Chaplain General, duties, 23 

election, 174 
Chapters, local, committee on, 15 

reorganization plan, 205 

report, 133 

statistics of, 137 
Charter, National, 24 
Charter to Idaho Society, 205, 207 

Mississippi Society, 205, 207 

New Mexico Society, 204, 207 
Clark, A. Howard, biography, 8 

elected Secretary General and 
Registrar General, 174 

on printing muster rolls, 13 r 

reports, 7S, $2, 85, 204-209 
Clark, Chester M., appointed As- 
sistant Secretary General 
for Baltimore Congress, 206 

District of Columbia report, 
144 
Clark, Kufus W., memorial to, 72 
Colorado Society, delegates, 74 

historical sketch, 93 

membership, 86 

officers, 38 
Committees, National, 12 

of Baltimore Congress, 64 
Connecticut Society, delegates, 74 

historical sketch, 93 

membership, 86 

officers, 39 

report, 143 
Constitution, 27 
Cox, W. V., report, 119 
Credentials Committee, T2, 66 

report, 73 
Crockett, \Y. I!., Vermont report, 

i?7 
Crothers, Hon. A. I,., remarks by, 

I'M 
Curtis, [,. B., nomination of M. B. 
Beardsley, 168 

329 



330 



SONS Oi- THIS AMERICAN R1;V0I,UTI0N 



Dc Cain-dry, William A., member 

Auditing Committee, 79 
Delaware Society, delegates, 74 

historical sketch, 94 

membership, 86 

officers, 40 
Delegates to Baltimore, J2> 
Dimitry, T. D., Louisiana report, 

District of Columbia Society, dele- 
gates, 74 

historical sketch, 94 

membership, 86 

officers, 41 

report, 143 
Dues, annual, 30 

Educational Committee, 13 

report, no 
Elections, 30, 32 
Empire State Society, delegates, 76 

historical sketch, 103 

membership, 86 

officers, 53 

report, 152 
Executive Committee, 12 

duties, 34 

meetings, 202-208 

membership, 207 

Finn nee Committee, 12 

Flag, National, protection of, 118 

Flag Committee, 14 

appropriation for, 203 

report, 114, 115 
Florida Society, historical sketch, 

95 

membership, 86 

officers, 41 
Forests, preservation of, 123, 125 
France, Society in, historical 
sketch, 95 

membership, 86 

officers, 41. 

Gaither, George R., toastmaster at 

Baltimore banquet, I77-IQ9 
Gibbons, Cardinal, invocation, 65 
Guthrie, R. W., nomination of 

Major Moses Veale, 172 
Guyer, Clarkson N., biography, 4 
' elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 176 
organization work, 203 
report, 108 

Hall, Frank O., biography, 10 

elected Chaplain General, 174 
Iiarris, W. C, Michigan report, 
* 148 



Hawaiian Society, historical 
sketch, 95 

membership, 86 

officers, 42 
Historian General, duties, 2s 

election, 174 

report, 91, 92 
Houghton, Ira H., member audit- 
ing committee, 79 
Howe, George R., report, 107 
Huntington, Hugh, Ohio report, 

154 
Hutchins, G. L., Utah report, 157 

Idaho Society, charter to, 205, 207 
membership, 86 
officers, 42 
Illinois Society, delegates, 74 
historical sketch, 95 
membership, H6 
officers, 42 
report, 144 
Immigrants, see Aliens 
Indiana Society, historical sketch, 
96 
membership, 86 
officers, 43 
Information for aliens, commit- 
tee on, 15 
Insignia of Society, 35 

award of prize, 89, 175 
Iowa Society, delegates, 75 
historical sketch, 96 
membership, 86 
. officers, 44 

/ 
Jefferson memorial, 163 

committee on, 15 
Jones, John Paul, location of 

statue of, 202 
Joslin, H. V. A., Publication Com- 
mittee, 132 

Kansas Society, historical sketch, 

97 
membership, 86 

officers, 45 
Kentucky Society, historical 
sketch, 97 

membership, 86 

officers, 4=; 
Kimball, H. W. f 131 

Massachusetts report, 147 

I aearde, P. !>.. nomination of P. 

P. Pescwl, 172 
Liberty Bell resolution. 164 
Local Chapters, Committee on, 15 
new members, 203 



GENERAI, INDEX 



331 



Local Chapters : 

reorganization plan, 205 

report, 131 
Louisiana Society, delegates, 75 

historical sketch, 97 

membership, 86 

officers, 46 

report, 145 
Lyman, Col. Charles, address at 
banquet, 180 

report, no 

McClary, Nelson A., address at 
banquet, 191 
on Local Chapters Commit- 
tee, 203 
McLean, Mrs. Donald, remarks 

by, 16 t 
Magruder, C. C, on Jefferson 

memorial, 163 
Mahool, Mayor, address of wel- 
come, 66 
Maine Society, delegates, 75 
historical sketch, 97 
membership, 86 
officers, 46 
Marble, W. A., nomination of Rev. 

F. O. Hall, 174 
Maryland Society, committees on 
Annual Congress, 64 
delegates, 75 
historical sketch, 97 
membership, S6 
officers, 47 

resolution of thanks to, 175 
Massachusetts Society, delegates, 
75 
historical sketch, 98 
membership, 86 
officers, 47 
report, 146 
Mastick, vS. C., resolution regard- 
ing delegates, 159 
Medal, distribution of, 84, 205 
Meetings, constitutional provision 

for, 30 
Members, register of new, 21 1-305 
Membership, by States, 86 
requirements for, 27 . 
total, 85 
Memorial, Jefferson, Committee 

on, 15 
Memorial Committee, 13 

report, 107 
Michigan Society, awarded prize 
insignia, 175 
delegates, 75 
historical sketch, 101 
membership, 86 



Michigan Society : 
officers, 49 
report, 147 
Minnesota Society, historical 
sketch, 102 
membership, 86 
officers, 50 
Mississippi Society, charter to, 
205, 207 
officers, 50 
Missouri Society, delegates, 76 ' 
historical sketch, 102 
membership, 86 L^ 
officers, 50 
Montana Society, historical sketch, 
102 
membership, 86 
officers, 51 
report, 148 
Moore, Commander John H., 64 
alien leaflet No. 2, 203 
nomination of C. N. Geyer, 173 
on Local Chapters Commit- 
tee, 203 
report on aliens, 138 
report on naval records, 133 
Moore, Edward B., Flag Com- 
mittee report, 114 
Morton, John, care of monument 

of, 159 
Moses, Zebina, report on Pension 

Records, 129 
Mullikin, J. R., New Jersey re- 
port, 152 
Muster Rolls, Committee on, 14 
report, 129 

National Anthems Committee, 14 
National Charter, 24 
National Monuments, 127 
National Parks, list of, 127 
National Parks Committee, 14 

report, 119 
Naval Records Committee, 15 
Nebraska Society, delegates, 76 

historical sketch, 102 

membership, 86 

officers, 51 

report, 150 
New Hampshire Society, dele- 
gates, 76 

historical sketch, 102 

membership, 86 

officers, 52 
New Jersey Society, delegates, 76 

historical sketch, 103 

member-bin, S6 

officers, 52 

report, 150 



33- 



SONS 01- THE AMERICAN INVOLUTION 



New Mexico Society, charter to, 
204, 207 
historical sketch, 104 
officers, 53 
New York Society, see Empire 
State. 

Officers, General, biographies of, 
4-10 

election of, 32 

list, 1889-1908, 17; 1909, 3 

of State Societies, 37-62 
Official Bulletin, 83, 203 
Ohio Society, delegates, 7j 

historical sketch, 104 

membership, 86 

officers, 54 

report, 154 
Oklahoma Society, historical 
sketch, 104 

membership, 86 

officers, 56 
Old Sow monument, 151 
Order of business at Annual Con- 
gress, 36 
Oregon Society, delegates, JJ 

historical sketch, 104 

membership, 86 

officers, 56 
Organization, Committee on, 13 

report, 108 

Parker, Moses G., nomination of 
W. K. Watkins, 174 
on Local Chapter work, 203 
reorganization of Chapters, 

205 
reports, 132, 133 
Past Presidents General, 15 
Paulson, F. G., Pennsylvania re- 
port, 156 
Pennsylvania Society, delegates, yy 
historical sketch, 105 
membership, 86 
officers, 56 
report, 155 
Pension and Muster Rolls Com- 
mittee, 14 
report, 129 
Pescud, Peter F., biography, 5 

elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 176 
President General, annual report, 
68 
duties, 32 
election, 1/ I 
Presidents General, Past, 15 
Press Committee, 14 
Prize banner, 89 



Prize insignia, 89 

Proceedings of Baltimore Con- 
gress, 65 
Publication Committee, 15 

report, 132 
Pugs ley, C. A., address at banquet, 

m 

nomination of A. Howard 
Clark, 173 

Records, Naval, Committee; on, 15 

report, 133 

Revolutionary, printing of, 13/ 
Registrar General, duties, 33 

election, 174 

report, 85 
Register of new members, 211-305 
Revolutionary records, printing of, 

131 
Rhode Island Society, delegates, 

.77 

historical sketch, 105 
membership, 86 
officers, 57 
report, 156 
Rhodes, Christopher, Rhode Is- 
land report, 157 
Richardson, J. M., address at ban- 
quet, 188 
Riggs, C. L., remarks at banquet, 
177 

Sargent, George C, biography, 7 
elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 176 
Scott, Mrs. M. T., remarks by, 162 
Seal of Society, 35 
Secor, Willard, biography, 6 

elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 176 
nomination of J. H. Bur- 
roughs, 174 
report, 78 
Secretary General, duties, 33 
election, 174 
report, 83 
Shipp, Thomas R., communication 

(in conservation, 202 
South Dakota Society, historical 
sketch, 106 
membership, 86 
officers, 58 
Spanish war medals, S8 
Special committee for Baltimore 

Congress, 614 
State Societies, Constitutional re- 
quirements, 28 
duties, 31 
officers, 37-62 



Civ NIC RAT, INDlvX 



333 



State Societies : 

reports, 143 

statistics of, 137 
Stone, C. G., Connecticut report, 

143 

Stockbridge, Henry, address at 
banquet, 200 
annual report, 68 
Executive Committee meet- 
ings, 202-207 
Sulgrove, Leslie, Montana report, 
150 

Tennessee Society, historical 
sketch, 106 

membership, S6 

officers, 58 
Texas Society, historical sketch, 
106 

membership, 86 

officers, 59 
Treasurer General, duties, 23 

election, 174 

report, 78 
Trustees, Board of, 11 

duties, 34 

election, 174 

meetings, 202, 207 

report, 78 

Utah Society, delegate, yy 
historical sketch, 106 
membership, 86 
officers, 59 
report, 157 

Vandercook, J. D., Illinois report, 

145 
report Credential Committee, 

73 
Vcale, Moses, biography, 7 

elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 176 



Veale, Moses : 

on John Morton monument, 
159 
Vermont Society, delegate, yy 

historical sketch, 106 

membership, 86 

officers, 59 

report, 157 
Vice-Presidents General, duties, 32 

election, 176 
Vincent, Gen. Thomas M., Flag 

Committee report, 115 
Virginia Society, delegates, yy 

historical sketch, 106 

membership, 86 

officers, 60 

Warfield, Hon. Edwin, address at 
banquet, 183 
resolution of thanks, 166 
Washington Society, delegates, yy 
historical sketch, 106 
membership, 86 
officers, 60 
report, 158 
Watkins, Walter K., biography, 9 
elected Historian General, 174 
report, 91, 92 
Wentworth, Elmer M., nomina- 
tion of W. Secor, 172 
Whitcher, W. F., nomination of 

PI. M. Baker, 172 
Wisconsin Society, historical 
sketch, 107 
membership, 86 
officers, 61 
Wyoming Society, historical 
sketch, 107 
membership, S6 
officers, 61 

Year Book, distribution of, 83 









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